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  1. #1
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    tired of juicy 3 and ready for bb7's

    Hi guys. Bottom line I'm sick of Juicy 3's and would like to go mechanical. Thinking of BB7's. Are they going to give me the same or better stopping power and better modulation or should I upgrade to different hydraulic.

    Tired of bleeding and squeaking.....


    thx.

  2. #2
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    I went shimano slx and haven't looked back since, had juicy 3s, demoed a bike with the slxs and was sold at first pull of the lever. Insane power over juicys, won't break the bank.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbell3186 View Post
    I went shimano slx and haven't looked back since, had juicy 3s, demoed a bike with the slxs and was sold at first pull of the lever. Insane power over juicys, won't break the bank.
    They look nice but I forgot to mention that I'm trying to keep in simple and cheap.

  4. #4
    CSC
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    I have BB7's...and they are, quite simply, incredible. I was talking with a shop guy at my LBS, and he said that a BB7 + a 185mm rotor up front will out pace a lot of low and mid class hydros. I like how they can get piping hot and still slow me down.

    Modulation-wise: They are mechanical, so you have, IMO, better feedback since you have a cable running from the caliper to your finger, instead of fluid. Your hand provides the modulation, so if you have good hands, you will have good modulation, haha. I would highly recommend them!

  5. #5
    Bikeaholic
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    I have BB7s on three different bikes. Each bike is set-up with 185 front/160 rear roundagon rotors. After four years of year round mountain, road and daily commuting I have only one complaint, the stock brake pads are noticeably inconsistent.

    My recommendation:

    Avid BB7 185/160
    Jagwire full length cables
    EBC Brake pads

    It's not the cheapest set-up but it can be built as your finances allow.

  6. #6
    CSC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Ice807 View Post
    I have BB7s on three different bikes. Each bike is currently have the stock set-up with 185 front/160 rear roundagon rotors. After four years of year round mountain, road and daily commuting I have only one complaint, the stock brake pads are noticeably inconsistent.

    My recommendation:

    Avid BB7 185/160
    Jagwire full length cables
    EBC Brake pads

    It's not the cheapest set-up but it can be built as your finances allow.
    I'd agree with the pads...might just be the metallic pads the calipers come with, but they do seem to be a little strange now and then (but not worth NOT buying the BB7's...still an awesome system). I brushed it off as buildup from heavy braking.

  7. #7
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    I have a set of juicy 3's on my cx and love them. Only down side is a feel like I need to bleed them after a few hart rides.

  8. #8
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    The BB7s are good, but you have to adjust them properly as the pads wear. They are heavy.

    Even Shimano Deore hydraulic is a very good option, however. It has servo-wave for pad clearance like ever other Shimano brake above it, and just works. There's no frills, but BB7s dont have that either. They're probably only slightly more expensive than BB7s, but maybe not. The price of the hydros includes the lever, but that's usually extra with mech brakes. You'll also have to get new cables sometime, but its rare to ever need new hydro line unless you damage it.

    Shimano clearly has better pad compounds. I think you'll be quite pleased with Deore or above.

  9. #9
    San Miguel Beer Drinker
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    on my ogre, i have a bb7 on it with 160mm rotors.

    after two rides, im quite happy with it. the brakes on my other ride is a m770 XT.

    not really on the same level as XT but it does its job very well. i got the bb7 quite cheap (built bike take-off), half the price of a brand new caliper + rotor set. good thing I found that deal. otherwise i would have gotten an SLX instead.

  10. #10
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    For keep it simple, stupid you cant beat BB-7. Here are some tricks i use.

    Full lengh cable, but i use 5mm shifter casing instead of brake casing. Really ups the stopping power.

    There is a great site on setting up avid brakes. In a nut shell it says to loosen the bolts holding the brake to the bike, turn in the big adjuster knob 10 times, then without the cable attached turn the small adjuster nob (outside one) in untill the brake is locked to the rotor. Tighten down your mounting bolts, then back off the adjuster knobs until the rotor spins free. That was your centering.

    Then just attach the cable, tighten it dow, and squeeze the heck out of the levers. 2-3 good hard squeezes will strech the brake cable.

    Now just readjust your now streched brake cable and go ride your bike. Thats it. No muss, no fuss. Bout every 6 rides i have to use the adjuster knobs to account for pad wear, aside from that your brakes are set.

    Honestly it couldnt be a simpler system.

    Bill

  11. #11
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    BB7s are great, i have them on every one of my bikes. Make sure you use compressionless housing (if you can find some Full Metal Jacket tubes, go for it, check Amazon). Very low maintenance, easy setup, easy adjustment in the field. Hard to beat them.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    I'd agree with the pads...might just be the metallic pads the calipers come with, but they do seem to be a little strange now and then (but not worth NOT buying the BB7's...still an awesome system). I brushed it off as buildup from heavy braking.
    Two of the three bikes came equipped with BB5s from the factory. I switched over to BB7s when the 5s pads where due to be changed. All of the bikes stop well but my mountain bike has a hydraulic-like feel to the brakes. They have been super-reliable and stupidly easy to adjust, even during a race.

  13. #13
    psycho cyclo addict
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    I have a set of BB7's on my SS. They work great- minimal pad wear and zero maintenance. I also have Elixir 5's, CR's and Juicy 7's... no troubles with any of them either. I'm 195 lbs. w/o gear on and run 160 mm rotors front and back on all of them. I had 185 front's on two of my bikes. The extra stopping power was overkill for 95% of what the trails I ride in MD/PA/VA/WV.

  14. #14
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    BB-7,s are excellent mechanical brakes, just set them up as above with crossracers 5mm. compressionless shifter housing, and you will never miss hydro's. IMHO hydros are overkill on bicycles, bikes are not rocket science so; KEEP IT SIMPLE.

  15. #15
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    bb7 is an excellent choice with ease of adjusting the bad clearance and enough bite for trail riding. highly recommended.

    have since changed to shimano deore hydro and equally good with no complaints whatsever. ease of bleeding and using mineral oil is a plus too!

    still keeping my bb7 for the next bike project.

  16. #16
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    A lot of people have problems with the Juicy line, you are not alone. I generally don't like Avid's hydro brakes, they are much more problematic than Shimano brakes. I prefer BB7's on my bike. Every few months, I start pricing out hydro brake systems, then give my BB7's a squeeze and realize how silly that is.

  17. #17
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    I have BB7's on two bikes. Compared to crap Avid Juicy and Elixir 3 hydro's, they have been great. No dreaded Avid turkey gobble or all the other known issues with crap Avid hydro's. I just pulled off my Elixir 3's that came stock on a bike I recently bought. I replaced them with the new Shimano SLX Ice Tech's, but if they give me trouble I'll be using BB7's on that bike too and will write off hydro's forever...

  18. #18
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    thanks for all the input guys!

    I recently installed the following purchased from price-point for $150.00

    front and rear BB7 (185 F and 160 R)
    Speed Dial 7's
    Alligator compression-less brake cables

    They setup ridiculously easy and will have to wait seat pads fully since we have been dumped on with snow here in the Adirondacks. I did testing in the basement and broke them in a little.

    SO simple and easy and something I adjust or fix trail-side.

  19. #19
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    +1 on that!

  20. #20
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    tested them this weekend in the snow and man do they work great. When the temp is below freezing the rear freeze up a bit but I guess that's expected with a cable system.... can't wait for spring.....

  21. #21
    CSC
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgfthntr View Post
    tested them this weekend in the snow and man do they work great. When the temp is below freezing the rear freeze up a bit but I guess that's expected with a cable system.... can't wait for spring.....
    Hmmm...they shouldn't freeze up too bad. Are the little rubber boots installed at the cable line opening? If so, I'd suggest adding just a little bit of oil to the cable right as it enters the cable line...should keep it from freezing up.

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