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  1. #1
    Mi nombre es Austin
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    Thoughts on BB7 for ALL Mountain

    I've been looking at getting some BB7's to replace my Juicy 3's. I'm sick of the performance of the Juicys and I heard the BB7 are better.
    If a XC bike with 4 in. of travel goes down the RedBull Rampage course and nobody is there to see it, is it considered DH

  2. #2
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    They both use the same pad so the theoretical braking power is the same. My BB7s did sometimes leave me with sore forearms on long downhills because they required more effort at the lever to reach that power and hold it. Not a huge difference though. The plus for BB7s that I saw for BB7s is that any problems or adjustments are entirely mechanical in nature and some people handle that better or are more comfortable with that than hydraulic systems

  3. #3
    OSCMTB
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    They both use the same pad so the theoretical braking power is the same.
    Sorry, but that's not true at all. Although brake pad size, shape and compound has a lot to do with braking power, it doesn't guarantee that two brakesets using the same pads will have the same power.

    BB7s can be adjusted to be plenty powerful. The trick is getting the pad spacing right.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley
    Sorry, but that's not true at all. Although brake pad size, shape and compound has a lot to do with braking power, it doesn't guarantee that two brakesets using the same pads will have the same power.

    BB7s can be adjusted to be plenty powerful. The trick is getting the pad spacing right.
    Come on, no truth at all? I'm not a brake engineer, but I do have some memory of my dynamics class and the physics involved. Assuming that there isn't a significant difference in heat dissipation between the two brakes and that the pad compounds and rotors are the same then the braking power depends only on the pressure from the pad and the size of the frictional contact area. It seemed safe to assume that you can put as much pressure on the pad with a BB7 as a Juicy (even if the effort from the rider is larger). We are therefore left with pad size as the remaining variable but we know that to be the same as well. Like I said: theoretical braking power.

    In reality I have had an easier time braking harder for longer with my Shimano hydros than my old BB7s, but I don't know how the pads compare

  5. #5
    Mr. Shibing
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    I personally never have j3, but I do have a set of BB7. So I can't really compare them.
    But BB7 is great in many ways.

    1. They are very very very easy to adjust. But since they are single action, you have to make the spacing right in order to make it powerful or it just suck.
    2. When you apply the force to the leveler, only one brake pad moves, so, if you left the other one more space than the moving one, you will feel vibrating, and some weird sound. Worse come to worse, you will bend the disk a little bit. (I had to bend them back..lol...)
    3. BB7s are good, I go with 185mm front and 160mm rear.
    4. Stock disks make noises, so clean them up with alcohol once a while.
    5. Braking power is pretty good, good enough to throw me out...lol...my bike shop guy(we're friends...lol...) was pretty impressed by the power after I adjusted them.

    Personally I'm more of a mechanical guy, hydraulic ones are defiantly better in stopping power, but maintenance is a little bit harder and messier than mechanical... So, I just give few words, hope it helps.

    When it comes to season changes, mechanical ones requires less work than hydraulic ones, keep that in mind.

    Peace~
    A Chinaman in the States. Here we go!

  6. #6
    cougarbait
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Come on, no truth at all? I'm not a brake engineer, but I do have some memory of my dynamics class and the physics involved. Assuming that there isn't a significant difference in heat dissipation between the two brakes and that the pad compounds and rotors are the same then the braking power depends only on the pressure from the pad and the size of the frictional contact area. It seemed safe to assume that you can put as much pressure on the pad with a BB7 as a Juicy (even if the effort from the rider is larger). We are therefore left with pad size as the remaining variable but we know that to be the same as well. Like I said: theoretical braking power.

    In reality I have had an easier time braking harder for longer with my Shimano hydros than my old BB7s, but I don't know how the pads compare
    usually people compare the braking power of the entire system, not just the caliper end. there are many factors in the mechanical lever vs the hydraulic piston that affect braking power
    09AS-Rsl/09Six

  7. #7
    The Mud Stud
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    Well I have tried juicy 3's as well as higher level brakes. The bb7's on my bike have only been beaten 2 times by anything. Those were by a set of avid juicy 7's, and by a set of shimano xt's (and the shimanos barely were any better) with the avids juicy 7's pulling out maybe 25% more power. The juicy 3's I tried, as well as many other brakes, both mechanical or hydraulic, failed miserably beside the bb7's. Alot with these brakes are the rotors and cables. I have some odyssey straight pull cables and hayes v6 rotors installed, and with that the thing can beat most other brakes on the trail except the top of the line models. This is with single finger braking too. So yes, bb7's are a great option to any lower level hydraulic brake.

  8. #8
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    In my opinion, I think it really depends on how aggresively you ride, how much suspension you have up-front and in the rear, and how big your rotors are, and your bike's geometry. For example, I used to have BB7's on a very light XC bike (100 mm forks suspension) and 3 1/2 inches suspension in the back. I ran them with 160 mm rotors front and back. My bike weighed around 26 1/2 pounds, I weigh around 150 lbs. I rode this bike to its limits (and probably beyond, because I once took it it to Mammoth Mt. in California) . The BB7's were solid and performed flawlessly.

    I switched to a 5 1/2 inch AM bike, the new bike has more aggressive geometry, more travel up front, more travel in rear, weighs probably 31 to 35 lbs. I installed the BB7's, and no matter what I did, I wasn't getting the stopping power, modulation, control that I was used to in the XC bike. Same rider, same brakes, different bike.

    So the BB7's came off and I installed Juicy 5's with a 185 mm rotor in the front. The difference was like night and day, so I was conviced the bb7's are great brakes but you need to match them to the correct bike and/or riding style that you tend to ride.

    I'm gonna rebuild my XC bike as as backup and I'm gonna install the BB7's back on that because frankly the bike works just fine with those brakes. But my AM bike will probably always have some kind of hydraulic brakes on them. just my two cents.

  9. #9
    The Mud Stud
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    Bigger rotors also give you more stopping power. The bb7's would probably work on your am bike if you put 203mm rotors on it, perhaps even with 185's.

  10. #10
    cougarbait
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    rotors have a huge impact on stopping power. when I had a 203mm on my front bb7, I could flip myself over the bars easily with one finger. Now that I have a 160mm, I need aggressive use of two fingers to pull a mild stoppie.
    09AS-Rsl/09Six

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