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  1. #1
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    Tektro IO Disc question

    Howdy Fellaz! I posted THIS in the Clydes forum, but I figured I might get more help here. Thanks!

    heres my original post
    Ok fellaz... I read up on the Tektro disc's in the brake section of the forum and I know they suck, but Im still kinda paying off my bike right now so I cant upgrade yet. anywayz... Ive read that the Tektro's disc's are still supposed to lock up the tires, but Is this still possible with clydes?? Im 6'2" at 330. thnx in advance!
    These are Tektro IO's
    Last edited by Kahu; 10-30-2008 at 01:39 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kahu
    Howdy Fellaz! I posted THIS in the Clydes forum, but I figured I might get more help here. Thanks!
    My suggestion would be that you go here http://www.tektro.com/04support/pdf/IO-English.pdf and download the manual for your brakes. Then go through the set up procedure as outlined in the manual Set up is the be all and end all for getting the best performance out of any mechanical disc brake. So set em up as indicated in the manual and then go from there.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  3. #3
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    Ok fellaz... Ive adjusted the heck out of these things and Im still having problems. My buddy has the same bike/setup and Im able to lock up his brakes no problem. The only difference is he has a Medium frame while I have a XLarge. Ive tried cleaning with alcohol and they still seem significantly weaker. Im wondering if my cables being longer could have something to do with it. I notice when squeezing the levers that the cable slack has a lot of play. Here are some pics





    do these look too long?

  4. #4
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    Take it to a bike shop.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Take it to a bike shop.
    I did. the guy just tightened the barrels on the levers. heh

  6. #6
    Meh.
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    Take it to a competent bike shop.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Take it to a competent bike shop.
    Thanks for your Infinite wisdom! Your a genius!


    anyone else who might be able to help??

  8. #8
    Lionel Hutz, Esq.
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    Are the brakes new? Sounds kinda like the pads haven't been bedded-in yet. They might be contaminated somehow. Once they're contaminated you might as well replace them - which will lead to a period of bedding-in where they won't bite as much for a while.

    I wouldn't worry about the cable length. They don't look alarmingly long. It can play a factor but not one as noticeable as you're describing. If the lever isn't returning quickly there could be a friction issue, but that wouldn't explain poor braking performance once the pads contact the rotor.

    The bike in the picture looks brand new. My guess is that the brakes need to be bedded-in.

    Edit: Are these aftermarket brakes? Only reason I ask is that from one of your pictures the rear rotor looks kinda small. Probably just the angle. I'm sure you could still get a 140mm rotor to lock up, but I suppose it would require more force than a larger rotor. Considering what little I know about your bike, everything I suspect is pretty basic and a competent shop employee should have gone over this with you. I'm not sure XSL_WiLL's wisdom is so infinite that it requires a capital "I" but there's some merit to the whole "take it to a competent bike shop" thing.
    Last edited by Thirdrawn; 10-31-2008 at 05:19 PM.
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  9. #9
    Meh.
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    If the levers pull very far before there is any resistance, then the cable tension is not set right.

    If the levers pull and there is resistance, but they feel mushy, then the pad gap is not set right or the caliper is not centered.

    Just because you adjusted them doesn't mean you did it properly. Take it to a shop.

    As mentioned, the brakes do need time to bed. But that's not the only issue at hand if the levers pull very far.

  10. #10
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    I had a set that took probably 45 to 50 miles to break in. I think they just take awhile. Sorry that's all I can offer but that is all the experience I have had with them. They are on a bike I don't ride a lot.

  11. #11
    *Contents Under Pressure
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    locking up the wheel has more to do with the traction the tire has with the ground and the momentum of the wheel itself (heavy wheels dont lock up as easily), then the weight of the rider. give it some time to break in, the IO's should defiantly lock up when the pads are broken in and set up correctly.
    There is an art, or rather, a knack to flying. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.

  12. #12
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    I have IOs, weigh 230, and they lock up in the back on pavement no problem, but not really in the front if i get my weight back. They took almost no break-in time, unlike every other brake set i've had.

    take it to a competent shop.
    .

  13. #13
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    The brakes are stock and came with the bike. They are semi new (6 Weeks) and Ive ridden the bike every other day from 4 to 8 miles. I have taken the bike down a hill nearby several times to try to break them in faster. I was going pretty fast down an underpass and almost took out a dog or vise versa. I squeezed the levers down hard and it felt like it just creeped to a stop. good thing the dog had some good reflex's or we would both be messed up.

    After that my buddy mentioned that he could lock his brakes up so I tested his bike out and it stops so much better and easily locks up the rear tire. I have adjusted the caliper using a business card to gap the pads and I have tried adjusting so both pads are constantly touching. I got the bike from Performance Bike and Ive been in there several times already, but don't want to feel like whiny baby by taking my bike back every time it makes a noise. I kinda want to learn to fix this myself, so I think I'll try new pads first because it sure feels like they are greased.

    thnx again for the input!

  14. #14
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    If your calipers are centered and close to the disk, tug on the cable without pulling on the lever. If it's not taut, then you need to readjust the cable tension. Looking at the last picture, it seems like you have no more room to adjust via the barrel adjuster. Looks like you can make it tighter at the lever though.

  15. #15
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    sounds like your pads are borked. Steal your buddy's pads and toss them in, they're held in by magnets and its super simple. If your brakes work... there you go.
    .

  16. #16
    knock-knock...
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    i find if i can fit a credit card in there, its going to be way to loose with my brakes. i dont have ios though

  17. #17
    ...a wiggle theres a way
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    its very possible that you glazed the brake pads -(probable causes are overheated them before a proper 'bed' in) this condition basically results in very poor braking performance and some possible vibrations.

    you can try a few things you can take some sand paper and rub the pads on them and try to 'rebed' the pads, the simplest thing is probably to just get some new pads and do the proper technique of bedding the pads (in a nut shell ride -- STOP---ride for a few minutes (to let pads/rotors cool down)---than repeat for a few miles. That should bed the pads (this is the way i do my cars, and bike and haven't had any issues but check with tektro tech docs to ensure thats the proper procedure ) http://www.tektro.com/04support/pdf/IO-English.pdf

    You may also consider taking the rotor off the rim and and cleaning it with some BRAKE-CLEEN (you don't want to spray it on your wheel as it will remove the paint)

    good luck and let us know what you find out

    joe

  18. #18
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    today I soaked the pads in alcohol and scrubbed them clean. I also sanded them until they looked new again. I am now able to lock the rear only if I squeeze the lever down pretty hard.

    I tested my buddies bike out again tonight and notice the lever action feels so much better on his. I then compared them side by side and notice his cables are a lot shorter and didnt flex when I squeezed the levers. When I squeeze my levers the cables flex and move. I think Im going to try to shorten the cable that runs near the seatpost to the rear caliper.
    took some pics of his.



  19. #19
    beautiful noise...
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    just needs proper adjustment...

    Try this:

    1. Loosen the grip-nut that holds the cable end onto the caliper arm.

    2. Loosen the caliper mounting bolts (the two bolts that point toward the floor).

    3. Tighten the barrel adjuster all the way at the brake lever.

    4. Loosen the barrel adjuster almost all the way at the caliper.

    5. Squeeze the caliper closed tightly on the rotor and hold it closed with one hand while you tighten the caliper mounting bolts.

    6. Squeeze the caliper closed again with your hand and pull the cable as tight as possible, then re-tighten the grip-nut that holds it in place.

    7. Turn the barrel adjuster at the caliper back in until the outer pad no longer contacts the rotor (about the width of a few sheets of paper).

    8. Get an allen wrench of the appropriate size and loosen the inner pad adjuster bolt on the back side (toward the wheel) of the caliper until you have approximately the same amount of space between the inner pad and rotor as on the outer side.

    Repeat for the other wheel.


    That oughta get the job done I put the same brakes with Avid SD-7 levers on my step-sons modified 6"x6" Enduro and when set up this way (with meticulous tweeking of course) they'll throw you over the bars with one finger
    [SIZE="4"]out- guy[/SIZE]

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  20. #20
    Pedal through the Pain
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    ^^^^^^
    Dead on, guyplaysbass!!! That is exactly how I adjust my brakes which are Hayes MX4, similar to the Tektros. And agreed, will definately put you OTB if your not careful.

  21. #21
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    Ill give that a try, but I definitely want to shorten that cable first. thnx

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by guyplaysbass
    Try this:

    1. Loosen the grip-nut that holds the cable end onto the caliper arm.

    2. Loosen the caliper mounting bolts (the two bolts that point toward the floor).

    3. Tighten the barrel adjuster all the way at the brake lever.

    4. Loosen the barrel adjuster almost all the way at the caliper.

    5. Squeeze the caliper closed tightly on the rotor and hold it closed with one hand while you tighten the caliper mounting bolts.

    6. Squeeze the caliper closed again with your hand and pull the cable as tight as possible, then re-tighten the grip-nut that holds it in place.

    7. Turn the barrel adjuster at the caliper back in until the outer pad no longer contacts the rotor (about the width of a few sheets of paper).

    8. Get an allen wrench of the appropriate size and loosen the inner pad adjuster bolt on the back side (toward the wheel) of the caliper until you have approximately the same amount of space between the inner pad and rotor as on the outer side.

    Repeat for the other wheel.


    That oughta get the job done I put the same brakes with Avid SD-7 levers on my step-sons modified 6"x6" Enduro and when set up this way (with meticulous tweeking of course) they'll throw you over the bars with one finger
    I shortened the cable housing that runs to the rear caliper and It stopped significantly better without as much of that squishy feeling. They are still more squishy feeling then my last rim brakes, but I'm satisfied for now. I adjusted the brakes using these steps and they finally feel like they are doing their job. The only thing I did differently was to play with the inner pad position before I tightened the Caliper mounting bolts. They seemed to stop the best once I adjusted the inner pad closest to the outside pad before I began tightening any bolts. Thnx again for the help!

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