Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    489

    technique for centering formula calipers?

    how do you guys center your formula calipers so there is no drag? on my K24's, front and rear, there is such minimal space between the pads that it seems impossible to get them perfect. I spin the wheel and with the caliper bolts loose move the caliper around until there is no drag. the problem is, as soon as I try and tighten the mounting bolts the caliper moves a hair and is dragging again. I had hope mono minis before, which seemed a whole lot easier to install.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: scoutcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,991
    get rotor on tightened to specs. then loosen the bolts that mount the caliper to the bike. next squeeze brake lever firmly engaging the brake, release and repeat 2-3 times. now squeeze brake lever again and hold --- while holding the brake, tighten the bolts on the caliper. once tight, release the brake and see if it spins without drag.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,136
    sounds like you're tightening one of the mounting bolts completely, then the other.

    basically, I do the same thing as you:

    loosen bolts. get them so that there isn't any up/down play, but you can still slide the caliper side to side.

    spin the wheel (slowly, unless you wanna lose a finger in a rotor)

    center the caliper (I view it from the top of the caliper), and LIGHTLY tighten one of the bolts so that side doesn't move. do the same for the other side. then start slowly applying torque alternating bolt to bolt.

    if you just try and tighten one bolt at a time, then they tend to rotate the caliper. tightening alternately makes one bolt hold the caliper in place while the other is tightened.

    At least that's what works for me and my k24's. your experience may vary.

    I find the squeeze lever and tighten method to be a little hit or miss, but it's a good starting point.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    489
    Quote Originally Posted by scoutcat
    get rotor on tightened to specs. then loosen the bolts that mount the caliper to the bike. next squeeze brake lever firmly engaging the brake, release and repeat 2-3 times. now squeeze brake lever again and hold --- while holding the brake, tighten the bolts on the caliper. once tight, release the brake and see if it spins without drag.
    thanks, I forgot to mention but I tried it this way first and it didn't seem to buy me anything. I had a lot more drag than if I did it the way I mentioned in my first post.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    489
    I wasn't tightening the first bolt all the way. I was alternating little by little but literally as soon as I tighten a bolt at all the caliper moves a hair and then there is drag. I thought maybe there was a better way to do this, but maybe I need to just keep on trying it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryguy17
    sounds like you're tightening one of the mounting bolts completely, then the other.

    center the caliper (I view it from the top of the caliper), and LIGHTLY tighten one of the bolts so that side doesn't move. do the same for the other side. then start slowly applying torque alternating bolt to bolt.

    if you just try and tighten one bolt at a time, then they tend to rotate the caliper. tightening alternately makes one bolt hold the caliper in place while the other is tightened.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,236
    Issue 1: The system may have been bled without the pads fully retracted. This will give too small a pad clearance with new pads. Simple to fix: open the bleed port on the lever (facing upwards and cover with absobent paper towel. Push back the pistons and excess fluid will be ejected.

    Issue 2: The mounting may not be 100% true. If this is on IS mountings with an adaptor, your LBS will have the tool to spot face the frame/fork for perfect alignment.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    131
    Also try to align 'manually', i.e. not with the pump brake lever and tighten bolts, but by aligning first the caliper and then the pads. This is the way Hope instructs to mount the caliper and should result in the most precise alignment you can get as it accounts for slight differences in piston mobility. There is a good instructional video for this procedure on the Hope web-site. This does not however alleviate you from the need for properly faced IS mounts. It does take a bit more time, but the results should be rewarding

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    489
    if you faced the IS tabs on a steel frame wouldn't it rust?

  9. #9
    TLL
    TLL is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TLL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,063
    Quote Originally Posted by cascades
    Also try to align 'manually', i.e. not with the pump brake lever and tighten bolts, but by aligning first the caliper and then the pads.
    I've aligned a bunch of brakes and find that this method seems to work with Formulas (and others) that don't seem to want to set up with with the standard "grab and tighten" method. Tho you only actually align the pads to the rotor, not the caliper.

    I have also found that some brakes (including Formula) do not align straight due to the tabs (on the bike) being out of alignment. Facing generally solves that.
    Hadley rear hub service here and here.

  10. #10
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,839
    I've gone to the effort to insert .005" feeler gauges between the rotor and pads, on both sides, and tighten each bolt a little at a time. Seems to work 90% of the time on the first try.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •