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  1. #1
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    Squeaky Brakes (pueberty?)

    I believe that my bicycle is going through it's adolescent stages of life.... one problem.... it squeaks way too much. The problem is only apparent on the rear rim, which i replaced. I believe that i have done everything to make it not squeal: Toeing the brakes in, truing the rim, cleaning the rim, taking steel wool to the rim, getting new brake pads (better ones, worked for a bit, but the squeal is really loud now), using a solvent to get some of the old brake residue off and thoroughly cleaning the rim countless times.... I'm gonna take it to the shop if i cannot fix the problem, but i wanted to post something here and maybe get a response before and maybe solve the problem. I know this issue must be a cliche, but ya know.... i haven't fixed the problem with all of the advice people have been getting form this.

  2. #2
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    Toe it in even more.

  3. #3
    nnn
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    Perhaps re-tension the wheel. That helped me once but it was on a factory wheel with loose tension.

  4. #4
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    Some frames / bushings / wheel spoke tensions will always be noisy.

    Try this,

    1. Don't "ride" your brakes and over heat your pads on descents, it glazes the pad compound. If you continue to do this and get squealing, your weight and lengths/sttepness of descent might be an issue, and you will probably have to go to larger rotors.

    2. Get yourself a piece of 400 SC wet/dry sand paper ( the grit is black silicon carbide) Set it on a flat piece of glass and add some clean water to it to carry away the grit. Pull your brake pads and move them on the sandpaer in a 2 inch figure 8 pattern. Do only 2 or 3 figure 8's with very light pressure.

    Clean the pads up and and dry them, then reinstall on your bike. If the noise has gone away, you are overheating and glazing your pads. If it comes back, the squealing, after a long or a steep descent, you need to either
    A. Improve your braking techniques by getting on the brakes hard, then off the brakes so they can cool.
    B. Spend the coin and get larger diameter rotors, or
    C. Spend the additional coin and see if sintered Metallic pads will handle the heat with your existing diameter rotors and braking techiniques.

    Loose bearings and bushings on 4 link frames and VPP suspensions can aggravate the resonations when you get squeaky brakes, so can improperly tensioned rims.

    What kind and model of frame is your bike?
    Last edited by Boyonadyke; 01-19-2008 at 10:58 AM.

  5. #5
    Meh.
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    I think he's got rim brakes... so no rotors.

    Check spoke tension, fastener torque, pivot tightness (if applicable), hub play, etc.

    What pad compound are you using?

    Some rims/brakes are just noisy. We've done some weird things at the shop like toe one pad in and one pad out and it's gotten the noise to go away.

  6. #6
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    I have a K2 zed sport 2.0 hardtail ; 6000 series hardtail frame. I have rim brakes, not disc.... i think i'm gonna try to convert it to discs soon and weld an extra adapter to make a mount on my frame. I got new kool stop pads online (www.pricepoint.com) and they brake nicely, but still noisy.

  7. #7
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    I purchased the kool stop brakes at www.pricepoint.com .... they grip nicely, but still squeak.... i'm gonna try some of the things you mentioned.... i might just reloosen the spokes and try to tension them equally because i do not have a tensioner gauge handy. could you tell me more about the fastener torque, pivot tightness and hub play? how much should it be torqued? I do have a torque wrench that torques from 10ft lbs to about 100 ft lbs. I don't know how accurate it would be down around 10 or so, but it should give me a general idea, so i don't over torque it too much.

  8. #8
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    hi, i had problem like this one, at the end i find that it cams from the spokes. so i cat small apices's of tub 2x2 centimeter and place them between the cross of the spokes.
    let me know if it helps you.

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