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Thread: squeaky brakes

  1. #1
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    squeaky brakes

    I have a nice 29er Outkast by Motobecane, and it has the loudest brakes I have ever heard. I looked at the rims, and they are smooth polished aluminum, but they have a recessed channel right in the middle of the sidewall of the rim, right where the brake pads lay down. Do I need to move the brake pads up or down to avoid the channel? When I come to a stop the noise sounds like a semi jamming its brakes! Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Toeing in the pads a bit can help with noise. Also, make sure that the pads (rim too) are clean and clear of any glazing.
    The channel down the center of the rim is a wear indicator and should not have any* effect on the noise (*if not a beneficial one).
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  3. #3
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    Just turn your Ipod up louder. Gets rid of lots of mechanical problems in my experience.

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    Great! Now I have to go out and buy an iPod. I was hoping for a cheaper fix.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by southern_pacific
    Great! Now I have to go out and buy an iPod. I was hoping for a cheaper fix.
    oh OK you should have been clearer then!!
    It sounds like you have a new bike.
    Before changing pads you might want to try removing them and lightly sanding the polish and finish off the contact side of them.
    Whatever you do don't do what my mate did which was lube them!!
    Kind of defeats the purpose really!!

  6. #6
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    Free fix - Don't use the brakes... As the saying goes in racing - Who needs brakes? Any idiot can make a bike stop. It takes a special idiot to make one go fast! :-)

    If it's a brand new bike - It could need to break in. You can speed this up by using a scotch brite pad on the rims, and a little sandpaper to scuff up the pads - both followed up with a wipe down with alcohol. Then check the alignment. Good luck...

  7. #7
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    Thanks so much. This is definitely a break in problem. I'll pull the pads and see if they have a glazed look to them. Sandpaper to follow.

    In lieu of Scotchbrite, when I am done with my 3M headlight restoration kit (drillbit sander), I may run the 3000 grit wet sponge over the rims. Not sure if this is overkill or underkill.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by southern_pacific
    ...I may run the 3000 grit wet sponge over the rims. Not sure if this is overkill or underkill.
    UNDER-kill! - unless you want them polished
    take a zero off if you want a nice braking surface.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  9. #9
    Noli Me Tangere
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    Sanding down the rims = way overkill. Not to mention accelrated wear.

    If roughing up the pads does not work, try changing them to a different brand, i.e 'Koolstop'
    Annie are you ok? Are you ok, Annie?

  10. #10
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    Resurfacing (snading/filing) the brake pads is the first thing I'd try, make sure they're toed in (lots of toe in on 'cross brakes has helped some friends with their squealing issues), then I'd look at some different pads - some pads are just more prone to squeaking than others your LBS should be able to recommend some that are less prone.

    The other thing that helps is taking a Scotchbrite pad (the green scrubby) and running it around the braking surface on the rim - that clears off some of the nastiness that accumulates and has reduced brake noise in some instances.

    S
    "You know how they make aluminum bike frames? They take steel and suck out all the soul..."

  11. #11
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    I fixed my squeaking brake problem by tightening my headset. It wasn't obviously loose, but by truly getting it snugged up I went from embarrassingly loud to silent. Some of the resonance that leads to the squeaking was apparently in the headset. Just a thought...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

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    Thanks again to everyone for the tips. I'll start with sanding the brakepads, and checking the toe-in. I don't think it is related to my headset, since it does it for both front and rear brakes, twice the volume! I'll also look into the Koolstop pads. Thanks again.

  13. #13
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by southern_pacific
    I have a nice 29er Outkast by Motobecane, and it has the loudest brakes I have ever heard.
    That is saying a lot, considering that you share your name with a railroad company.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    That is saying a lot, considering that you share your name with a railroad company.
    you're undoubtedly thinking of UNION Pacific
    SP's brakes lull you to sleep
    Die UP!!!!

    check this shot I took as the train blew past at 40-MPH+ (no exaggeration)
    You can see the conductor/engineer scopin' me out
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  15. #15
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    I do not remove the pads to sand them, just slip the paper, rough side to the pad, between the rim and brake pad. Use a Velcro strap to lightly squeeze the brake lever, then hold the paper against the rim while moving it back and forth.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    you're undoubtedly thinking of UNION Pacific
    Southern pacific railroad--------------> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souther...tation_Company

    They ran a ton of narrow guage tracks in the gold country of NorCal for a long time... still see SP engines all over NorCal. Every gold town has one.



    and they have REALLY LOUD brakes.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  17. #17
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    Southern pacific railroad--------------> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souther...tation_Company

    They ran a ton of narrow guage tracks in the gold country of NorCal for a long time... still see SP engines all over NorCal. Every gold town has one.



    and they have REALLY LOUD brakes.
    I was being sarcastic - MTBR: make a sarcastic smilie!


    I'm a quasi-railway buff (read; newb) - sooooo...
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  18. #18
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Aaah sarcasm. I usually get it.

    All I know about trains is that they have a big SP on them and they have loud brakes.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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