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  1. #1
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    so i broke my Deore XT V brake.... :( ARRRGHH!!!

    well, i got a little excited today and overtightened the little screw for tension adjustment on my brakes. i was using a power screw driver (doh) and i went overboard when tightening the little thing. it basically cracked the entire plastic piece thing.

    im guessing im pretty much screwed, unless there is a way i can find this piece. i feel really mad at myself because these brakes were near brand new and i managed to destroy them without much use from tightening them. arggh im so mad at myself.

    its the piece with the long bar that pushes the brake back into position. the bar which you can adjust the tension of by tightening or loosening a screw.

    anyway, what good brakes should i get? or are there any rebuilt kits with this part that i might be able to pick up? thanks. im so pissed at myself.
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  2. #2
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    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
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    Power tools? Never heard that one before...

    and all your photos are out of whack so I can't see what you're trying to describe. The "long bar" you refer to is called a spring. I doubt you can buy the part I'm thinking you broke; maybe you can find some old brakes you can cannibalize from a buddy easier. Check Alfred E. Bike (aebike.com) as they have a pretty good selection of parts. If you have an LBS you deal with, maybe they can help out. Next time keep your power tools away from your bicycle or else.
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    and all your photos are out of whack so I can't see what you're trying to describe. The "long bar" you refer to is called a spring. I doubt you can buy the part I'm thinking you broke; maybe you can find some old brakes you can cannibalize from a buddy easier. Check Alfred E. Bike (aebike.com) as they have a pretty good selection of parts. If you have an LBS you deal with, maybe they can help out. Next time keep your power tools away from your bicycle or else.
    you know, i was actually able to repair it believe it or not. took the spring tension adjuster and its counterparts off an old bike (shimano atlus) brakes and managed to get them to fit together. not perfect but works extremely well for being mutated.

  4. #4
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    Several things:

    -you're better off for having broken the damn things in the first place. XT brakes, believe it or not, never really worked too well to begin with. Had em, hated em, bought Avids instead. If you decide to replace, go with an SD7. There's just so much more power, and they work very, very well.

    -It's good that you learned your lesson, I hope, about not using power tools on bicycle components, because they can be damaged. Particularly when you deal with aluminum, like on stems and frames, and brakes.

    -It sounds to me like you really don't understand how the return spring adjustment screws work, or you haven't had much expereince with them. In my expereince, sometimes as little as 1/4 turn in the right direction can make all the difference. They're not something to just be bolted down. Read that again, so that you understand. They're NOT mounting hardware. They're adjusting hardware, and there's a difference. You don't crank them down. You turn them a little bit in whatever direction helps align the brake caliper. They're a fine tuning thing, and even in applications where a power screwdriver is warranted (ie, NOT ON BIKES) noone who's trying to fine tune anything will use anything but a hand tool, because it's just much easier to control.

    The basic idea with those return springs is that you want them to have enough power that they'll pull the caliper away from the wheel easily, but not so much power that you have to work harder to make them move. If you can get them down to a lower tension, the braking action will be a lot smoother. So many people just crank down those springs, but once in a while you'll ifnd someone who's figured it out, and their braking system feels so smooth, becuase it just slides, and you're not having to compensate for over-tightened springs. You'll also have a much better feel for how well the brake is working when you're not fighting it to keep it engaged. When there's not a lot of tension being applied, subtle differences become more apparent.

    But the other reason those screws are there is that they enable you to center the caliper so that it doesn't drag on one side or the other of the rim, or engage unevenly. The return springs are not well made, calibrated precision parts; they don't need to be. Provided you know how to use the return springs effectively, and you can use a little bit of judgment and bend them a little bit if one is really wacked out, cheap return springs work fine. But if you just crank down both adustment screws, 99 times out of 100, the brakes simply won't be centered, and a lot of the time, you'll end up dragging a pad. So don't just crank down on those screws. That's not what they're for.

    It's surprising sometimes how little tension they really need. Sometimes one spring is just too tight, and trying to tighten the other one to compensate just doesn't do dick, but bringing it back to lower tension, and then loosening the tight one a quarter turn will balance things out nicely, and the result is brakes that are centered, don't drag, and don't take much energy at all to use.

    Take the time to learn to properly adjust those brakes. Even if you come to understand that XT brakes are crap, you'll still need to understand how to adjust any other kind of V brake you decide to install. And the better you're able to actually adjust them, the better they'll work for you, and the more you'll get out of your brakes.

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