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  1. #1
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    Sintered compound brake pad noise ?

    Been running Hayes sintered (full metallic) brake pads in my old Hayes carbon brakes for years. There was a closeout on Alligator brand full sintered brake pads so I bought a whole lot. A couple weeks ago I installed a set and within an hour they started making a bit of noise. I tried just about everything to get them to stop making noise w/o any luck. Installed the old pads and the noise is gone. So I guess all sintered pads are different ? I don't really wan to run semi-metallic's as they seem to wear quickly. Do I pony up for Haye's Sintered pads or give another brand (less cost) a try ? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Spanish rider
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    Brake noise is somehow stochastic: sometimes brakes are quiet, sometimes they are not. Sometimes even the same brand of pads yield completely different results.

    What kind of noise are they making? High pitched noise? Low pitched noise and lots of vibration/resonance?

    In case of low pitched noise maybe the pad's geometry is slightly different and it's making contact with the "arms" of the rotor. Check this because it's a common issue with some pad/rotor/fork/caliper combos. In case this happens just add some washers to move the caliper slightly away from the front axle.

    In case of high pitched noise or metal-to-metal noise.... Learn to live with it.

    Sometimes the noise changes (for better or for worse...) after getting the brakes SERIOUSLY hot. Try getting them hot by pedalling hard on the granny ring+big cog while applying each of the brakes for a while. You'l get surprised how hot they get in a matter of minutes.

    However, if the brakes work and the noise is somehow bearable try to live with it.
    A pessimist is an experienced optimist

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pableras View Post
    Brake noise is somehow stochastic: sometimes brakes are quiet, sometimes they are not. Sometimes even the same brand of pads yield completely different results.

    What kind of noise are they making? High pitched noise? Low pitched noise and lots of vibration/resonance?

    In case of low pitched noise maybe the pad's geometry is slightly different and it's making contact with the "arms" of the rotor. Check this because it's a common issue with some pad/rotor/fork/caliper combos. In case this happens just add some washers to move the caliper slightly away from the front axle.

    In case of high pitched noise or metal-to-metal noise.... Learn to live with it.

    Sometimes the noise changes (for better or for worse...) after getting the brakes SERIOUSLY hot. Try getting them hot by pedalling hard on the granny ring+big cog while applying each of the brakes for a while. You'l get surprised how hot they get in a matter of minutes.

    However, if the brakes work and the noise is somehow bearable try to live with it.
    I adjusted and readjusted . I sanded the pads and rotors. Cleaned and cleaned. The pads are just plain noisy mainly when the rotor skims the pads (no brake application) Like I mentioned I installed the old pads and they are silent. I might try another set as I have a box full. If they are noisy they will all enter the circular file.

  4. #4
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    Brake noise can have a bunch of causes, but as I learned a pad that's labelled sintered or semi metallic doesn't mean they're the exact same composition as the pads you're replacing. That then leads to a contamination- where the old friction material (that's imbedded in the rotor) and the new one don't necessarily play well together. Usually the end result is some noise. From what you wrote, that seems to be the case here. Another possibility is that the newer pads have a higher coefficient of friction. Since everybody has gotten on the war path to having the best brakes possible, and friction material plays a role in that, brake noise issues seem to have crept up as a result.

    Of course all of this is subject to the steps you took to bed the pads into the rotor when you first installed the new ones.
    You are not what you own.

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