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  1. #1
    Killer of Chains
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    Should I let the shop handle my hose install/bleed?

    Since Installing my Pike on my Prophet, I now need the front brake lines extended on my Hayes 9's.

    I've also had a rear brake laying around that I was able to install because it was too short.

    Basically, I'm hoping that I could cut the longer hose on the uninstalled brake to the front, and have the rear brake hose lengthened.

    Of course this would also necessitate a brake bleed, which is a messy process.

    Is this one of those deals where buying the house, the fittings, and doing the brake bleed will end up costing me more than paying someone else to do it?

    I've bled my brakes before, before I don't have any of the tools required in installing new hoses. I figured the shop would charge less for hose than buying it online.

  2. #2
    TNC
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    noMAD man
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    Frankly I think Hayes are one of the easiest brakes to bleed of any made. One can do it with a little plastic squeeze bottle and two pieces of chainsaw fuel line. You use any old plastic container...like an old fork oil bottle...and just put a hole in the cap for the plastic fuel line to dump the pushed out brake fluid into up at the lever/master cyclinder.

    As far as the brake hose is concerned, a single-edged utility razor blade will cut the hose. You get a few extra crush-sleeves for the hose ends, and you're pretty well set. A Hayes hose mod and bleed is darned simple. If the old hose isn't abraided, kinked, or UV damaged, you should be able to use it if lengths are appropriate.

  3. #3
    Meh.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    Frankly I think Hayes are one of the easiest brakes to bleed of any made. One can do it with a little plastic squeeze bottle and two pieces of chainsaw fuel line. You use any old plastic container...like an old fork oil bottle...and just put a hole in the cap for the plastic fuel line to dump the pushed out brake fluid into up at the lever/master cyclinder.

    As far as the brake hose is concerned, a single-edged utility razor blade will cut the hose. You get a few extra crush-sleeves for the hose ends, and you're pretty well set. A Hayes hose mod and bleed is darned simple. If the old hose isn't abraided, kinked, or UV damaged, you should be able to use it if lengths are appropriate.
    Ditto. Personally I prefer a syringe over a squeeze bottle. Having the bleed fitting for the lever does make things a little cleaner, but you can get by without it.

  4. #4
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    I like the syringe as well, but sometimes I wish they were a little bigger. Like twice the size........= )
    I used to have a stash of syringes from my old GF who was a horse vet. those things were huge, but I can't seem to locate them lately.

  5. #5
    TNC
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Ditto. Personally I prefer a syringe over a squeeze bottle. Having the bleed fitting for the lever does make things a little cleaner, but you can get by without it.
    Ooops...yes...I forgot about that little high tech plastic push-in fitting for the master cylinder. Well, maybe "high tech" is pushing it a bit.

  6. #6
    Killer of Chains
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    That little high-tech push in fitting is really helpful.

    When I bled them before I wedged something pointy, I kind of forget what, I think it was a air-needle for sports equipment, into the hole.

  7. #7
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    I use some tubing that would pop out and spill all over the place once it gets too heavy w. brake fluid...

  8. #8
    TNC
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk45de
    I use some tubing that would pop out and spill all over the place once it gets too heavy w. brake fluid...
    Well...use some different tubing.

    The only time I had any messy moments with my Hayes was probably 2 to 3 times when the tubing popped off the bleed valve at the caliper...and that's since about 1999. That little push-in plastic fitting at the master cyclinder is practically nothing, but it's pretty amazing at holding the tubing for the fluid that's going into the fork oil bottle catch container. There's not much pressure up at that drain tubing. The main pressure is down at the caliper when you're squeezing the bottle...or for you drug addicts, your syringe. Also, if you end up using the same piece of tubing down there at the caliper bleed valve all the time, the tubing gets soft and flared out a bit and is easier to pop off.

  9. #9
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    are you kidding me, i'll just position the tubing against a wall or something.... going out and searching for tubing is too much work. i do it drug addict style w/ needle and syringe so no mess down there - er or maybe i'll call it always mess down there

  10. #10
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    What end of the hose should I cut to make my life easier?

    Would it be easier to take it apart at the caliper, cut and reinstall on that end, or do it at the lever?

    Any idea on what tools I used for this? I assume really small wrenches, but I have no idea.

  11. #11
    TNC
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    I think it's easier to work at the master cylinder end. The fitting is usually a little easier to work with and you'll have less distance to push the air out, as the exit bleed hole it at that end. If I recall, it's a 10mm nut at that end of the hose.

  12. #12
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    Compression fittings, can I reuse those already in the hose?

    It's probably not proper, but I don't feel like paying for fittings and stuff.

    Also, are there fitting that allow you to connect two pieces of hose together?

  13. #13
    Are you talking to me?
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    NO. and wait.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPeelinPbody
    Compression fittings, can I reuse those already in the hose?

    It's probably not proper, but I don't feel like paying for fittings and stuff.

    Also, are there fitting that allow you to connect two pieces of hose together?

    Let me get this straight. You are (sort of) willing to pay a shop to do the work, but do not want to pay for new fittings?

    Do yourself a favor, and do it correctly. Have the shop do it.
    gfy

  14. #14
    Killer of Chains
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    No, it's more laziness.

    I don't feel like going out and getting the fittings if I can reuse those already in the lines.

    That was part of the issue...if going out and buying fittings, hose, fluid, and bleed parts was going to be as expensive as having the shop do it, then I'd just have the shop do it. They've got bulk fittings, bulk hose, bulk fluid, and can bleed the brakes in a matter of minutes. If I pay them $30 to install new hose, and it costs me the same to do it on my own...why wouldn't I have them do it?

    However, I have no idea how much the shop charges to do such a job, so it could be more like $60, in which case I have no problems doing it myself.

    Buying new fittings if I don't need to is a waste. Too often manufactures tell us to do things just cover their asses in the rare event something goes wrong. If reusing old fittings results in crappy brakes, then obviously I'd want to get new fittings.

  15. #15
    Meh.
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    The fittings deform to seal. Reusing fittings could result in leaks.

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