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  1. #1
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    Saint's overkill for XC/Enduro?

    Im looking to upgrade my existing shimano brakes. Control and durability are my top requirements for brakes, price and weight are last on the list.

    Would 160/160 saint brakes on an "Enduro" bike really be overkill power wise? How do they compare to old 4-pot XTs? They are priced right and I would prefer sticking with Shimano.

    I'd like to hear from someone who has used Saints and has possibly used them on a non-dh/fr bike.

  2. #2
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    Just do XTs. My Saints are way overkill for an XC bike, and actually don't work all that great cold, so they're better on a DH bike where you're really working them.

  3. #3
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    also curious about this......

  4. #4
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    Depends on which generation Saints. The old two piston Saints are the exact same as XTs and are just fine for Enduro/XC.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Depends on which generation Saints. The old two piston Saints are the exact same as XTs and are just fine for Enduro/XC.
    Fair point. I was assuming the new 4pots, since the OP mentioned the old 4 pot XTs by way of comparison.

  6. #6
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    No such thing as too much power.

    Depends on the your weight, bike weight, and tire size. If you are a clyde or on a 30+ lbs bike or and using 2.35+ tires Saint will work out fine but.... 160/160 Saint setup is a bit oddball, doubt anyone here has ridden such a setup.

  7. #7
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    Get a set of Formula RX/R1s and save almost a pound!

  8. #8
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    I run new Saint on all my dirt bikes. They are the sickest. Usually 170/150 trail, 180/160 FR, 180/170 DH

  9. #9
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    I was referring to the new saint brakes. They are price quite well considering their reputable performance.

    I like the idea of formula, but I also like sticking with the reliability of shimano. My buddy rides with elixir CRs, and they seem to have the kind power im looking for (though i've only ridden his bike a little), but i dont want to buy them and have to put up with the high probability of squealing/vibration/pita bleeding. I've seen/worked on a lot of juicys and a few elixirs, never liked what was going wrong with all of them.

    I am also waiting on the hayes primes...


    Im about 190 lbs geared up, riding a "enduro" oriented HT (if that means anything), but i usually find myself pushing the boundaries of what the bike is capable of, as far as riding goes. I need brakes that keep up...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slurry
    I was referring to the new saint brakes. They are price quite well considering their reputable performance.

    I like the idea of formula, but I also like sticking with the reliability of shimano. My buddy rides with elixir CRs, and they seem to have the kind power im looking for (though i've only ridden his bike a little), but i dont want to buy them and have to put up with the high probability of squealing/vibration/pita bleeding. I've seen/worked on a lot of juicys and a few elixirs, never liked what was going wrong with all of them.

    I am also waiting on the hayes primes...

    It depends on how cheap you can get it. As for the performance it should be a great break, with good mod. It's heavy though. SLX is another good one as well. Also agree with other poster, 6"/6" rotor is not going to be a good match. Even at 8" there's plenty of modulation. Not grabby.

  11. #11
    awesome
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    Just do XTs. My Saints are way overkill for an XC bike, and actually don't work all that great cold, so they're better on a DH bike where you're really working them.
    do you have metallic or organic pads?

  12. #12
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    New saint M810s can be had for $149 no rotor (wholesale). XT is about $120, SLX about $95.

    Hayes Prime Pro are $120 come with floating rotors and bells/whistles that seem beneficial. Any real reviews of these yet?

  13. #13
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    I LOVE my Saint M810's w/203mm rotors. As a 225lb rider, they are exactly what I want/need for all my rides. In fact, I am left wanting more power at the Whistler Bike Park
    "It looks flexy"

  14. #14
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    I have three seasons on a set of XT's (newer style). I ride a 34 lb 6" bike and weight around 215 w/gear. Running a 203 front and a 180 rear. These have been stellar for trail riding that includes sane DH. I don't feel like I need more power unless I am trying to do stoppies at low speeds. I think the front not locking can be a good thing in panic situations on a trail.

    I took a trip to Whistler BP this summer and my opinion is slightly different now. The trails there are steep and fast. The XT's on my 6" bike still worked ok but I could have used more in that situation. The last day I rode a DH bike with Saints and 203 rotors. The great modulation of the XT is still there but they are STRONG. The only problem I had was accidently locking the front wheel on occasion. The locking front was not that big a deal on the low / slack race DH bike. It may be more of a problem on a trail bike with a higher CG though. I did get more used to the brakes and started to really enjoy the power toward the end of the day.

    I am also considering Saints for a Knolly Delirium (7" bike 34-38 lbs.). I would probably not run them on anything smaller. That build would be on 180 rotors front and rear to take some of the bite out of the Saints and offset some of the extra weight. I don't have any idea how a Saint would work with a 6" rotor but would be worried about warping rotors due to excess heat. The larger rotors really help heat dissipation and pad wear.

    Also have considered doing a Saint front and XT rear... Anyone out there doing that as an option?
    Last edited by bubba13; 11-08-2010 at 06:25 PM.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slurry
    Im about 190 lbs geared up, riding a "enduro" oriented HT (if that means anything), but i usually find myself pushing the boundaries of what the bike is capable of, as far as riding goes. I need brakes that keep up...
    If you're reasonably heavy and fast and ride hard, then I do not think they would be overkill. They are definitely more than most people will need but if you're the type of person who has never felt like their brakes were too strong, why not get some stoppers that go to 11? There is no one size fits all when it comes to brakes. If the current XT brakes are not powerful enough then you need to go up a notch.

  16. #16
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    I run Code 5's and Saint's on multiple bicycles , I also have a single instance setup of Avid Elixir R and Hayes Stroker Ryde. Out all of all these hydraullic brake systems I would have to say the Saint is by far the best and most versatile brake that I have used. Not only do Saints have excellent stopping power they have a very linear power curve and they're extremely easy to modulate. I think the Saints are comparable to the Elixir R's in terms of control. However the Saints are powerful so unless you're doing some crazy downhill I think a 203mm rotor might be a bit much. I've read accounts of owners actually downgrading their rotors in order reducing stopping. However this could be beneficial if you have a smaller rotor on the wheel it reduces your rotating mass. In fact I wonder if it's better to have a powerful caliper and a smaller rotor.

    If you have the money just buy the Saints and simply get a 160mm rotor. There is no reason why you shouldn't have the extra power,unless grams really are that important.

  17. #17
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    Just rode my M810's for the first time yesterday & they really are as powerful as others have said. They replaced M765 (203/160) that were uber reliable so time will tell. Today I'm changing the front rotor to a 180

    About the free stroke screw......Anyone have a easy explanation to what it does in layman's terms? Shimano's translation to english is a bit lacking.
    SPD pedals are an absolute menace to the well-being of the world, and ought be banned immediately.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bordershy
    Just rode my M810's for the first time yesterday & they really are as powerful as others have said. They replaced M765 (203/160) that were uber reliable so time will tell. Today I'm changing the front rotor to a 180

    About the free stroke screw......Anyone have a easy explanation to what it does in layman's terms? Shimano's translation to english is a bit lacking.
    It is basically an adjustment for the point at which the brake lever starts to work. It can be adjusted to start early or late in the lever pull. In my experience it does not change much with the XT's, but it might with the Saints.
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  19. #19
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    Thanks bubba13 for the reply. In adjusting the free stroke screw the change in feel is very subtle. Probably will find a "happy spot" & leave it there untill i hone my braking skills to these stoppers.
    SPD pedals are an absolute menace to the well-being of the world, and ought be banned immediately.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slurry
    I was referring to the new saint brakes. They are price quite well considering their reputable performance.

    I like the idea of formula, but I also like sticking with the reliability of shimano. My buddy rides with elixir CRs, and they seem to have the kind power im looking for (though i've only ridden his bike a little), but i dont want to buy them and have to put up with the high probability of squealing/vibration/pita bleeding. I've seen/worked on a lot of juicys and a few elixirs, never liked what was going wrong with all of them.

    I am also waiting on the hayes primes...


    Im about 190 lbs geared up, riding a "enduro" oriented HT (if that means anything), but i usually find myself pushing the boundaries of what the bike is capable of, as far as riding goes. I need brakes that keep up...
    I use the new style saints for A.M. and there great !!! That being said xt and slx will also do the trick...
    Yhea, the hayes primes look real sweet also..

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