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  1. #1
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    Running Mechanical Brake Lines?

    In order to run mechanical brakes lines, such as the BB7, how have you boys run the lines? Most frames these days only have two cable blocks (stops the housing but allows the cable to run through), one for each shifter cable, and one open hose guide (the hose sits on top or through) for hydro disc brakes.

    With the open hose guide and full length housing, its difficult to have tension on the cable for optimum brake operation.

    What have you boys used to solve this problem? I think the Problem Solvers or Jagwire guides might work.

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...99&category=18
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  2. #2
    thecentralscrutinizer
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    Have you seen the Voodoo guides. They work pretty well too. I use them in conjunction with the Jagwires on my HT.

  3. #3
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    My frame came with open hydro guides, both did actually. I run a continous line no breaks in it, this I find is best keeps a lot of grim of the lines. Those should work for existing lines.
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  4. #4
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    I have the open style on my frame. Two on the top tube and two on the L seat stay. I simply hold the cable on them with small zip ties. Honestly, I have not noticed any difference in braking and I have used 3 different cable set ups thus far on this bike. Standard cable with a teflon lining, Gore cables and now Alligator i-Link cables.

    If you follow the directions on Avid's Youtube video, I don't think you will have any problem getting the proper feel out of your brakes. I simply pull the cable as tight as I can with a pair of needle nose pliers while tightening down the cable locking bolt. Works every time and the results have been consistent. If you don't pull the cable tight prior to bolting it in place then you would have to adjust the barrell adjuster on your levers or on the calipers themselves though Avid states that if you feel squish that you should dial in the pads. So far, I have not had to touch the barrell adjusters.

  5. #5
    Never trust a fart
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    The key to running full length housing with mechanical brakes, is making sure that all the slack on the inner cable is taken out. With the housing at the correct length, and the inner cable tight, full length housing is the way to go.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by myitch
    In order to run mechanical brakes lines, such as the BB7, how have you boys run the lines? Most frames these days only have two cable blocks (stops the housing but allows the cable to run through), one for each shifter cable, and one open hose guide (the hose sits on top or through) for hydro disc brakes.

    With the open hose guide and full length housing, its difficult to have tension on the cable for optimum brake operation.

    What have you boys used to solve this problem? I think the Problem Solvers or Jagwire guides might work.

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...99&category=18
    It is easy to have tension on the cable with full length housing. In fact, full length housing is preferred, even if you have to bypass the housing stops.

    Full length housing does not even have to be attached to the frame for the brake to work.
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  7. #7
    Did I catch a niner+?
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    Don't want to steal thunder and I know this is a brake sub forum but what is the story on running full length shifter housings?
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  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57
    Don't want to steal thunder and I know this is a brake sub forum but what is the story on running full length shifter housings?
    I prefer full length shift housing, too. Same principles apply.
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  9. #9
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    From my experience running full length vs. cut sections on shifting cable, its much more tight and helps for crisp shifting. Now with brakes I'd think its even more important for tight lines, especially since more flex will affect braking strength. Thats why decent hydros work so well, instant pressure on the pads.

    I'd venture to say that if you ran full length vs. cut tensioned sections, the latter would be much stronger, just like with shifter cables.

    But besides this discussion, I do want to run the housing with cable stops and am looking for solutions out there. Even with the Jagwire or other guides, there's only so much room for cables/housing on the frame. And those large cable stops that wrap around the frame will interfere with the other cables.

    Now I'm thinking, the only option is to run full length, which I dont want to do. It's either that or stick with expensive hydros.
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  10. #10
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    for straight runs...SS tubing
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
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    what's SS tubing? stainless steel?

    thats nice but more $$ and I dont think i'd feel a diff from reg housing. just like with SS vs reg. on hydros.

    im thinking if there was a small part to allow cable stops to secure on the open cable guides of the frame, this could work...
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...754&category=7

    but it's gotta be on there tight or else with the tension on the cable, it'll come right off.
    Last edited by myitch; 01-13-2011 at 12:31 AM.
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  12. #12
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    I have heard about running SS tubing for straight shots and all have had great reviews but my weight consciousness will not allow such a thing!

  13. #13
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Quote Originally Posted by myitch
    what's SS tubing? stainless steel?

    thats nice but more $$ and I dont think i'd feel a diff from reg housing. just like with SS vs reg. on hydros.

    im thinking if there was a small part to allow cable stops to secure on the open cable guides of the frame, this could work...
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...754&category=7

    but it's gotta be on there tight or else with the tension on the cable, it'll come right off.
    yeah, stainless steel
    works like cable stops and open sections, except everything is nice and sealed like a full length housing.
    there's less compression and drag, so, yeah, I think you could feel a diff. between that and 'regular' housing.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  14. #14
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    I run the stainless steel set up as well. I simply use small zip ties and secure to the hydro stops on my frame. The key IMO to direct and consistent feel with mechanical brakes is zero flex in the housing. Running yokozuna housing definitely improved the feel on my BB7's.
    I agree with you Myitch on the issue of better feel with cut sections or more precisely creating tension between the cable stops. Unfortunately many frame manufacturers are welding hydro stops on their frames even if the bike is speced for mechanical brakes. I'll be the first to admit that I probably spent more than a mid-level set of hydros to get my BB7's working the way I expect them to but is somewhat offset by their dependability and virtual maintenance free nature.

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