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  1. #1
    T_N
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    New question here. Rotor Size Question

    I have Juicy 3 brakes with 4" rotors and i want more stopping power, with the fork i have i can only put a 5" disc in the front but i can put up to an 8" in the back. I don't have enough money to put a new fork or new calipers on, so i figured the only way i could stop faster is to put bigger rotors on. Should i put an 8" in the back and 5" in the front or both 5"? Is there another way to stop faster that i haven't thought of? Would Juicy 3's even work with 5+ inches?

  2. #2
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
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    For starters, I think you're meaning to say 6" and 7", or more technically accurate, 160mm and 185mm, but whatever...

    Start with just the 185mm rotor up front. I think you'll find that to be plenty.

    You say in your profile that you ride DH. A 185 or a 203 in the rear is going to be beneficial if you're overheating to the point of discoloration and excessive squeeling, but in all likelyhood unnecessary from a power standpoint.

    To answer you last question, yes, the Juicy 3 will work fine with any of Avid's rotors & adapters.
    speedub.nate
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  3. #3
    wyrd bi ful rd
    Reputation: chinaman's Avatar
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    The rear always seem to lock up easily and so the max I will recommend is 185mm ... but I think 160mm is more than sufficient unless with your kind of riding you will need a larger rotor for dissipation of heat due to constantly having your brakes on.

    Usually we will use a larger rotor in front as it is more effective.

    For my rigid hardtail I used a 180mm front and 160mm rear which I have to admit is an overkill, but it looks good. For my FS bike, I used a 203mm front and 183mm rear ... still way above what I need it for ... but good to have .... just the way I like it ...

  4. #4
    Welcome to the Gem...
    Reputation: Mallanaga's Avatar
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    just chiming in here, as this question has been on my mind.

    the whole point of having... 'offset brakes' if you will... is due to the tendency of the rear wheel to lock up if there's too much braking power. the front can handle the bigger rotors because as you brake, the weight of everything is shifted to the front and puts more stopping power into the front tire itself.

    right?
    2008 JabberWocky
    Chubs... Carbon... Good...


  5. #5
    wyrd bi ful rd
    Reputation: chinaman's Avatar
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    Exactly ... once you have started to brake and slow down, there is a tendency for your weight to go forward as well which will further take the weight off your rear wheels. This the same with bikes (those with motors) as well. The front tends to have larger rotors.
    Last edited by chinaman; 01-06-2008 at 04:16 AM.

  6. #6
    T_N
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    Thanks everyone for the advice, i think i will do the 185mm front and 160mm rear.

  7. #7
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    The smallest front rotor that most forks can accommodate is 160mm (commonly called 6").

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