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Thread: Is a Rotor...

  1. #1
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    Is a Rotor...

    ...a rotor is a rotor is a rotor?
    Adam Ann Arbor, MI

  2. #2
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    No, a rotor is a rotor....

  3. #3
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    Generally yes....however with that said, rotors do come in slightly different thicknesses and some will not work as well with certain systems.

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    Can we say that thicker rotors are better than thinner, as a general rule? What other factors may make for a better rotor?

    (no, neither question is sarcastic nor rhetorical... I'm a neophyte and I'm in the market for rotors)

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    thicker rotors are heavier which is bad b/c well it takes more energy to move around. heavy is good in that it takes more energy to heat up. thick is also good b/c it is stiffer. so yes a thicker rotor is better.

    fastors for a good rotor eh? off top of my head: strength, heat dissipation, heat capacity, weight, durability, linear friction w/ pad.

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    Cool, thanks!

    How would an average joe, like myself, identify or determine those factors?

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    You can guess by thickness, tract width, rotor material, and diameter. As of material, there are few lightweight materials but I'd just stick to stainless steel. You need one with the correct width so your pads don't hang off. Bigger diameter rotors handle heat better and they provide more leverage so better power. On the downside, they are heavier and are easier to flex b/c their size. Thicker rotors are stiffer and stronger, they handle heat better than thinner rotors. On the downside, they are also heavier. Unlike big diameter rotors, they don't give you more power.

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    Excellent!!! That was very helpful; I appreciate your time and insight.

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    NP, b/c I have no life like ratty2k stated

  10. #10
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    All different! Yes they are all rotors, some work better than others.

  11. #11
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    Any brands that work better than others? Or Designs?
    Adam Ann Arbor, MI

  12. #12
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    and here i thought a rotor was a rotor. silly me
    nothing in life is real, so if anything goes wrong, blame the dead guy

  13. #13
    29 some of the time...
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADDam
    Any brands that work better than others? Or Designs?
    That is a better question.

    Galfer was very highly regarded. They don't get much press nowadays though. I tried a set of their pads and wasn't impressed so I never purchased any rotors from them.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  14. #14
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    the larger in diameter rotors can give more surface area for cooling, but mostly they give you a better fulcrum leverage, thus allowing less force necessary to apply pressure. For example using a longer larger wrench handle to move a bolt or nut.

    The large rotors can warp due to the heat and uneven cooling. The better design would be rotors that have arms that support the outer braking ring. such as XTR and Hope Rotors.

    I went from 6 inch xt to 8 inch hone, then to 8 inch XTR. I noticed braking improvement from the rotors alone. I probably over did it just a little, but like the look and the one finger braking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nagatahawk
    -snip-

    The large rotors can warp due to the heat and uneven cooling. The better design would be rotors that have arms that support the outer braking ring. such as XTR and Hope Rotors.

    I went from 6 inch xt to 8 inch hone, then to 8 inch XTR. I noticed braking improvement from the rotors alone. I probably over did it just a little, but like the look and the one finger braking.
    So, if I go from my stock 160mm Tekros (ugh!) to 203mm BB7s, am I asking for trouble in terms of warping?

  16. #16
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    I never wrap a rotor on my one piece hone rotor. I would guess not.

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