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  1. #1
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    Replacing Rotor Bolts. Can I use grease?

    Guys,
    The rotor bolts have loctite on them, and I don't think the originals were greased before they were put in, probably to make sure they ALWAYS stayed in place. Given my difficulties in getting the last set of bolts out, would there be any harm in putting a wee bit of grease on the end of the bolt? I suppose that negates any benefit of the loctite?
    Thanks,
    J

  2. #2
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    yes, it negates the locktite.
    I wouldn't grease them.
    you shouldn't have to crank them down as hard as they did in the factory. they were probably overtightened and that's why they were hard to get out.
    Locktite helps keep them at the desired torque.

  3. #3
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    Okay, no loctite. Thanks nato_the_greato !

  4. #4
    ballbuster
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    Uh, no!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayzonk
    Okay, no loctite. Thanks nato_the_greato !
    use a small dab of blue loctite on each bolt. You don't have to crank them down super tight.

  5. #5
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    I think you misunderstood me, I would use locktite, and not use grease

  6. #6
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    I had the same problem on my new bike. I ended up breaking 6 t25 bits and I finally had to use a punch and hammer to get the torx bolts out. It turns out they had blue locktite. Realistically they shoud have came out without snapping all of those bits. I wanted to use blue locktite again given the stresses that happen on the rotor so I went to Loews and bought metric bolts that have an 8mm socket head. Perfect fit, no clearace issues, and with the socket head I can easily remove them in the future. Dont forget to torque the rotor and my LBS said to use a triangle tightening sequence vs the straight across tightening sequence.

  7. #7
    whatever she says gueuze.
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    bolts...

    I absolutely hate it when they are on super tight. I've used grease and they're fine and down the line, they come off without the risk of stripping the head.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crashly
    I had the same problem on my new bike. I ended up breaking 6 t25 bits and I finally had to use a punch and hammer to get the torx bolts out. It turns out they had blue locktite.
    Try using some heat next time. I've never had a problem with rotor bolts, but I have had problems with manufacturer applied thread locker when removing a small screw holding the rebound knob in place on a fork. I managed to get it loose by holding the tip of a low wattage soldering iron against the bolt head for a short period of time. It worked amazingly well.

  9. #9
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    No problems with lightly greasing the rotor bolts and the threaded holes in the hubs - just make sure that you don't contaminate the rotor or pads.

    This advice comes from personal experience of building approx 2 disc equipped bikes a week since 2001 and servicing hundreds of mechanical and hydraulic disc brakes.

    I have never used a torque wrench on rotor bolts - I have always judged it by feel. Never had greased rotor bolts come loose or lost in the wilderness during aggressive rides even after years of neglected maintennance on them.

  10. #10
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    Dude, just put some blue loctite on them and snug them up well. If you have any problems in the future with getting out the bolts then you have a different problem. No grease, that is silly and unecessary. Who puts grease on a bolt? If you apply grease they will eventually wiggle out. And grease doesn't make it easier to remove. If you want easy to remove use anti-seize.

  11. #11
    xx = xtrČ
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    i did put grease on my winter bike rotor bolts, they are still tight and i'm still alive.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIfreeDE
    Dude, just put some blue loctite on them and snug them up well. If you have any problems in the future with getting out the bolts then you have a different problem. No grease, that is silly and unecessary. Who puts grease on a bolt? If you apply grease they will eventually wiggle out. And grease doesn't make it easier to remove. If you want easy to remove use anti-seize.
    Who puts grease on a bolt? It's silly and unnecessary? Grease will make them eventually wiggle out? Really? Maybe it's your advice that's more silly and unnecessary?
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIfreeDE
    . Who puts grease on a bolt? .
    some bolts ,like the seat post, it makes sense

  14. #14
    Vaginatarian
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    the purpose of greasing a bolt is a) to keep it from welding itself to another piece of metal (like a bare metal seat post and the bare metal inside a seat tube) and b) to insure no binding while torquing a bolt ( like the handlebar clamp on a Thompson stem)
    Loctite is to prevent fasteners from loosening on their own and especially would be useful on parts that are repeatedly heated and cooled like brake rotors, alot of the rotor bolts come with loctite pre installed. loctite wont work on grease , so don't bother combining. if the rotor bolts are properly torqued and have blue loctite on them they will not be too hard to remove Shimano calls for 18-35 in lb. Hayes and Avid 50 and 55
    most likely the OPs were installed too tightly by someone who never uses a torque wrench and can do it by feel

  15. #15
    Can Tree Member
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    I'm going to make a confession here...I was stuck in between "grease" and "loctite" when I was installing rotors on a new set of CK hubs...wasn't sure what to do, then had an epihpany (or maybe it was just a seizure) and used some teflon-based pipe dope that I had in the toolbox.

    It seems to have worked great so far (3 years on the rotors with zero issues) but I am worried about how I'll clean them up when I eventually have to replace the rotors or rebuild the wheel...that stuff is stickier than antiseize, smears when you try to wipe it up, and I have no idea what solvents will dissolve it.

    But I'm still alive...
    Dad is sad.
    Very, very sad.
    He had a bad day.
    What a day Dad had!

  16. #16
    Woodlot local
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    If properly torqued, a rotor bolt should not come loose.

    For steel rotor bolts I use blue loctite, for ti bolts I use anti seize grease, for all bolts I use a torque wrench.

    dan0 is correct about why you use grease or a drop of oil on the treads of screws.

    I check most bolts on my bike once a month and vital bolts every week (stem, bars and brake caliper bolts). It's like a pre-ride ritual for me.

  17. #17
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    From the sounds of things, it sounds like it's hard to go wrong whether you use loctite or grease. I didn't have any loctite, but I had lots of grease, so I used a very small amount on each [loctite-coated] bolt. Since I plan on checking them regularly, grease won't be a problem, and it'll make them easier to come out when I replace them. For the guy that doesn't maintain his bike well, I think I'd suggest loctite, since they likely will never touch the bolts. Since I've got a hobby shop for maintaining my bike, I am going to use grease so I can thread them in an out easier when the time comes to swap them out.

  18. #18
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    There is a type of Loctite that works in the presence of oil/grease on the threads. I don't remember the number of it right off hand, though.

  19. #19
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    My rule of thumb is, if the fastener sees any repeated side-loading or torquing (rotor bolts, suspension linkage, chainrings etc) it gets loctite (blue). If the bolt is a simple clamping bolt (stems, pedals, etc) it gets the grease.
    I dunno if I'm making a difference, but I like ti think I am
    Honestly, you just take a deep breath and say Fuck it.

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