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  1. #1
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    Replacing OLD hayes Hydraulics

    I bought a Schwinn Moab Disc in 2000 that has served me well, but is now in need of some new brakes. I havent paid any attention to the developements in bikes/brakes for the past 10 years now and I'm a bit overwhelmed as to what I can get to replace what I've got. I'd like to do the install myself but am not sure how to tell what I need to purchase in order to make for a hassle free installation. I'd like to stay with hydraulics but am not completely opposed to a decent set of cable disc brakes.

    Any advice on where to start?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Single Speed Junkie
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    I would wager that pretty much any new hydraulic brake on the market today would out perform the 10 year old set of Hayes. I'd be price shopping seeing if you could get some Formulas, Hope, Magura or Shimano brakes. I've never really been a fan of Hayes and after bleeding a few sets this past week they only re-enforced my opinion.

  3. #3
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    Jenson USA had Hayes Stroker Trails for $69 each with rotor a while back.

    For that money, I think that's one of the best brake going. Easiest brake to change pads or bleed that I've had. They have also been the most hassle free hydro brakes I've had as well.

    Lots of great newer brakes out there. Lever shape/feel/adjustments/reservoirs/bleed port positions have come a long way in ten years.

    For mechanicals, I don't think you can beat Avid BB7s.

    If you are going to install your own hydros, there are some tricks/specifics involved when cutting hose and installing fittings. Without the right tools for cutting hose and installing fittings or the correct bleed kit for your particular brakes, "hassle free" might to be a stretch.

  4. #4
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    I wasn't at all clear about my question. I'm most concerned with mounting the new brakes (the calipers and rotors) without too much/any issue. Are the mounting systems standardized, or will I need to hunt down adapters and whatnot for a 10yr old bike?

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    Former Bike Wrench
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    The 2000 Moab used the 22mm rear caliper mount which is obsolete now, there are some adapters out there like this one from A2Z but I don't know how well it works.

    The old Hayes had tons of power and were very reliable...just lacking in modulation. The easiest thing would be to rebuild those brakes.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    The 2000 Moab used the 22mm rear caliper mount which is obsolete now, there are some adapters out there like this one from A2Z but I don't know how well it works.

    The old Hayes had tons of power and were very reliable...just lacking in modulation. The easiest thing would be to rebuild those brakes.
    I have the AD-PMR adapter on my bike to mount the rear caliper. works well enough and has allowed me to fit a 180mm disk instead of the little 160mm.

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