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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    removing stripped torx bolts

    i was trying to remove the disc rotor off of one of my wheels the other day and i managed to strip the heads of several of the torx bolts. i just wanted to know whats the best way to remove these damaged bolts without doing any damage to the hub. i was thinking that i could just use a dremel tool, cut a slot in the bolt and use a screwdriver to unscrew the bolt. anybody else have any suggestions???

  2. #2
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    Focked.

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  5. #5
    Meh.
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    Yes, you can use the dremel to cut a slot and use a flathead. You can also cut the heads off and use a vice grip to grab the stud that's left. You can also use an ez-out.

    Lots of options.

  6. #6
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    A few weeks ago, I had the same problem. The bolts are pretty small for an EZ out. I ended up using a "nibbler"- a plier like tool w/ sharp edges at the end that come together like a pair of dykes (wire cutters), but at the end of the tool, not the side. Was able to grab the bolt and turn- the bolt was soft enough. Once partway out, a pair of normal pliers did the trick. HTH

  7. #7
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    the bolt will be easy to take out once you remove the tension. First try to see if you can get something to fit tight, sometimes you can tap an allen in there. Next I would go for cut a slot, if that fails, just cut the head off, this will remove most of the tension forces, then remove the rotor and use pliers to screw them out, some may even come out by hand.
    When you get them all out, throw away whatever tool you were using that rounded them all out.

  8. #8
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    Hey, Invicta. What is it they say about an insane man continually doing the same thing and expecting different results? :-)

    This is just a tip, perhaps it would have been helpful at the beginning of your project. Torx drivers, just like allen wrenches and screwdrivers, become rounded through use. They must be touched up on a bench grinder to maintain optimum performance.

    A good tool can last decades, and can be resharpened many, many times.

    Oh, yeah... you must first start with good tools. If your using Torx drivers made in China or from inferior material, throw them in the trash immediately to avoid this problem in the future. Trash tools can't be relied upon even one time to complete a job without goofing it up.

  9. #9
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by InvictaS1
    i was trying to remove the disc rotor off of one of my wheels the other day and i managed to strip the heads of several of the torx bolts. i just wanted to know whats the best way to remove these damaged bolts without doing any damage to the hub. i was thinking that i could just use a dremel tool, cut a slot in the bolt and use a screwdriver to unscrew the bolt. anybody else have any suggestions???
    Drill off the heads, remove the rotor and grab the stub of the bolts with vicegrips to remove them.
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  10. #10
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    It also helps to heat the bolt heads with a propane torch to burn off any Loc-Tite on the threads.

  11. #11
    Disgruntled Peccary
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Drill off the heads, remove the rotor and grab the stub of the bolts with vicegrips to remove them.
    If you have a left handed drill bit, that may back them out in the process. They work better than ez-outs.. which really royally suck if they snap.
    mike

  12. #12
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    Try cutting a notch first and using a screwdriver, but sometimes even that won't work.

    Worse case scenario is to saw/file off head, then remove the disc and use pliers/molegrips to remove remainder of bolt. An if you can't get the bolt out, no matter - you can run a disc with you only 5 bolts, no problems (I've done this on one hub for several years without issues)
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  13. #13
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    I had this same problem recently with some ss 4mm bolts that rounded off. I cut a slot in them with a dremel and then heated them up with a soldering gun. Still could not get them to turn so I just took the screwdriver and angled it in the side of one of the slots and tapped it with a hammer and tuarned the bolt. Easy scmezhy.

  14. #14
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    Heres a trick my younger bro showed me for getting sheared bolts and studs out of alloy casings, it should work fine for a rounded drive but given the small size of the rotor bolts you should use extreme caution, especially if the head is sheared off!
    It will work though for bolts/studs which have sheared below the surface of the alloy while drilling will invariably ruin the alloy: drill skids off hard steel and cuts alloy like butter

    Fit a nut over the top of the bolt/head which gives a good tight fit( if sheared) or just so you can see the head then use a MIG welder on lowest power to build up the steel of the head/stump so that the weld metal fills the hole in the nut. CAUTION! this should be done in short bursts of @1 second and allow the bolt/stud to cool. When the nut is filled with weld metal , preferably you have a small dome protruding, up the power slightly and weld the plug and therefore the bolt/stud to the nut. While it is hot drop a socket over it and it should unscrew easy so long as your spot welds to build up the bolt/stud are good. The heat of the repeated welding will have freed the bolt/stud even if its rusted in.If your plug shears off you can try as many times as you like, or can stand before chucking it, so long as you dont weld too much in one go the alloy draws the heat away so it shouldnt get damaged if you are accurate with placing the weld wire on the bolt/stud.

    Ok this is a little extreme for cycle gear but if the next step is to bin it then nothing lost?

    I'd try the Dremmel thing first though, if you have access to a soldering iron it will do the heating without damaging the finish on the hub or warping/softening the rotor

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