Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    60

    Rebuild or scrap Juicy 3 rear brake

    Need some advice here.

    Bought a 2011 Trek X-Caliber in August of last year (new). The rear wheel gave me all kinds of problems, and I ended up having it rebuilt by a different shop than the one I bought it from (long story). When I got the wheel home, I threw the cassette on it, but in my haste, did not put the rotor on. I put it on the bike, gave the crank a few revolutions, and then squeezed the rear brake lever.

    When the wheel didn't initially stop, I squeezed a second time before I realized what I had done. The pads had come together.

    I used a small flat-headed screwdriver to pry them apart, but I noticed a small bit of brake fluid had come out from around one of the pistons. I took the pads off to inspect that they had not been contaminated, and I don't think that they were.

    I put the rotor back on, and the brake seemed to build pressure well, however the stopping power did not return to what it should have been. I was thinking about attempting a bleed the other day, when I pulled pads off, and noticed a little bit of what appeared to be brake fluid on the backs of both of them....

    So I'm torn. I don't love these brakes, but I don't necessarily want to pitch them either. I believe the caliper needs to be rebuilt, and the system bled.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    164
    If you are seeing brake fluid on the backs of the pads you may have a bad seal on one or both of the pistons. Before tearing apart the caliper and replacing the o-rings on the pistons I would just try to confirm where the leak is coming from.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    60
    Update - took the rear caliper off, and disassembled it. I cleaned it, and put it all back together. Successfully bled the brake, cleaned the rotor with alcohol, and threw a new set of pads on. After a short test ride, everything is back to normal.

    This was my first time working on hydro's, and I have to say it was easier than I expected. As long as you have patience, and a good clean area to work, anyone could do the same.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    164
    Good to hear. I'd keep a close eye on it for first couple rides, inspecting for leaks, etc. but likely you've fixed it. bravo!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •