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  1. #1
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    Rear drag while pedaling

    I have Juicy Ultimates and have been having a problem with the rear brakes squeeking and dragging while pedaling. When stopped they spin free. I have a Scott Spark so the dropouts are very smooth carbon, i have tried different quick release skewers and have cinched them pretty darn tight. The strange thing about it is that is doesn't do it when i first start riding, it takes about 20 minutes then the longer i ride, the worse it gets. Could it have something to do with the brake fluid heating up or getting air bubbles? Any ideas?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    I think I need to Upgrade
    Reputation: AzSpeedfreek's Avatar
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    How old are the brakes? Did the brakes come on the bike or are they aftermarket brakes? Does the brake lever feel mushy at all? It is possible that there might be some air in the lines or caliper, a bleeding would cover this possibility. There is also a possibility that a piston might be sticking.

    Now for the part you don't want to hear as a possibility, have you checked the frame for any cracks?

  3. #3
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    Thanks, brakes came on the bike, it is almost 2 years old and havent done much work on the brakes other than replace the pads. Should i replace the fluid or just bleed them?

  4. #4
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    First thing that comes to mind is flex in the hub or rear end. The torque from pedaling is causing either the caliper to move or the disc to move.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny_T
    Thanks, brakes came on the bike, it is almost 2 years old and havent done much work on the brakes other than replace the pads. Should i replace the fluid or just bleed them?
    Blast some new fluid in and push all the old out.

  6. #6
    I think I need to Upgrade
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    After 2 years, it is time for a fluid flush, if you have the ability to do it your self, go for it, but only with the Avid bleed kit. If you don't have the ability or the bleed kit, then take it in to your LBS, but make sure that they have the kit, and tell them you want the brake fluid flushed/system bled. Do both front and rear brakes while you have it in the shop. While you ahve the bike in the shop, tell them abot the problem that you are having and see what they might be ale to find. As another poster said check your rear hub also, this is simple, grab the top of the wheel, and the seat post and see if you can rock the wheel side to side, if there is any play then it is time to adjust/service the hub.

    Just kinda an FYI I do reccomend a fluid flush every 1-2 years, if your riding conditions are more to the severe side error closer to the 1 year point. If your conditions aren't that sever or you don't ride the bike a lot then more to the 2 year point.
    Last edited by AzSpeedfreek; 05-05-2009 at 04:13 PM.

  7. #7
    Meh.
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    Flush and bleed with a high quality DOT fluid. With DOT fluid brakes, I would bleed/flush once a year.

    Make sure that the caliper is dead center too. There's not a lot of room between those pads.

  8. #8
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    I've had many problems being a Clyde and the rear hub dragging the disc brakes. The issue I was having was cheap rear hubs wearing out the tolerance on the side play on sealed bearing wheels. There was no way to preload the bearings, so the hub would move in relation to the axle and cause the disc to drag under pedaling, directly related to the amount of load on the wheel from the chain and cassette.

    2 things solved my problems... Getting a set of DT Swiss 440 Freeride hubs, front and rear, and getting a set of Hadleys for my 29er. Both hubs have bigger bearings, the Dt Swiss 15mm and the Hadleys 30mm bearings. Problem solved with both hubs.

    If you ride more than on weekends, you need more than introduction to biking "weekend" grade hubs... you need commerical or heavy duty grade hubs that will go the miles.

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