Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tillers_Rule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    501

    Radial master cylinders, back to standard?

    What's up with some of the manufacturers (Shiimano and Avid) going back to the standard master cylinders? Sure seems like the radial style didn't last long. I haven't used the radial style, but whenever I'm in the bike shops I'll mess with them and the adjustable levers and feel sure are nice. Hayes seems to be sticking with the radial style, for now. Just another marketing gimmick?

    If I'm not clear with my naming conventions, this is what I'm referring to,

    Radial:


    Standard:
    Last edited by Tillers_Rule; 09-12-2010 at 04:23 PM.

  2. #2
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    926
    Radial didn't last long? All manufacturers have been using them on and off since the beginning of mountain bike disc brakes. Formula had them at the end of the 90's, for instance. It's just another arrangement. Not better, not worse. When Hayes started making better brakes that followed the El Camino, that was one point that they put up as something of a HUGE deal, just to put it there. It was the consumers who didn't do their research to see that this style was nothing special.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tillers_Rule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    501
    Quote Originally Posted by junktrunk
    Radial didn't last long?
    I'm not referring to the entire existence of brakes, but rather a couple of the manufacturers. Shimano and Avid being two of the largest.

    I have a 2004 bike with Shimano components, brakes are standard style. My buddy picked up the same bike in 2006 model year, standard brakes. So, maybe 2007 is when Shimano started with the radial style, 2011 their back to standard.

    It's just another arrangement. Not better, not worse
    So this statement would tend to agree with the marketing statement.

    Oh well, now that they are going back, I can pick up some radial style XTR on the cheap!
    Last edited by Tillers_Rule; 09-12-2010 at 04:19 PM.

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    926
    I don't see how you make the immediate jump to marketing. It's pretty obvious in the pics you posted that you aren't comparing apples to apples, as in the first, you have stand-alone levers, and in the second, you have a new, lower-profile design that's meant to be coupled with the shifters.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tillers_Rule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    501
    Quote Originally Posted by junktrunk
    I don't see how you make the immediate jump to marketing. It's pretty obvious in the pics you posted that you aren't comparing apples to apples, as in the first, you have stand-alone levers, and in the second, you have a new, lower-profile design that's meant to be coupled with the shifters.
    I'm comparing the 2010 XTR lever to the 2011 XTR lever, how is that not apples to apples?

    Maybe I chose a bad picture, but I'm referring to just the levers, not the shifters, which are stand alone in both model years. I went back and changed the pic

  6. #6
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    926
    Changing the picture of the 2011 does not change what it was designed for. They made a new lever for a much lower profile and matable to a lower profile shifter.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tillers_Rule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    501
    So do you have an opinion on the why they changed the design as far as performance in concerned? From what I can tell, the XTR group has always been designed to compliment the various components.

    I changed the picture because you seemed to be hung up on an assumption that the 2011's are designed to work in conjunction with the shifters while the 2010's weren't.

    The Shimano website says absolutely nothing about a more streamlined profile when it comes to the new brakes, thought it mentions performance a couple of times. If they were designed with this in mind, I would think Shimano would be hyping it up:

    Riding comfortably at speed requires an unconscious, intuitive confidence in your machine. It requires knowing that whatever conditions you come across your brakes will be ready and able to deliver reliable control in any situation.

    Say hello to XTR Trail brakes, and say goodbye to compromise. The integration of Servo-Wave brake-boosting technology into an XTR-level brake generates gobs of lightweight stopping power (125 percent of the previous XTR benchmark, to be exact) that can be precisely rolled on and off with single-finger effort—leaving a better grip on the bar for charging through the gnar.

    With industry-first full ceramic caliper pistons, radiator-fin-backed brake pads to shed performance-sapping heat, and innovative IceTech aluminum-core rotors to even further keep heat buildup at bay, these all-new brakes maintain cool, quiet performance under fire.

    As the most powerful and most controllable XTR-level brake of all time, XTR Trail absolutely assassinates wide-open descents with uncanny consistency, delivering more confidence than ever before.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •