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  1. #1
    I'd rather be riding!
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    New question here. Proper length for brake lines?

    I was considering that the Juicy 5 brake lines that came on my bike needed to be shortened because of the excess hose that sticks out in front of the bars. But then one day I slipped on some wet leaves while climbing an off-camber rock and ended up with one of them falls where you are still on the bike wondering what happened. I noticed that that my front wheel had turned 180 degrees when I fell and that all my lines were then only just at the point of full extension.

    My question then is, is this the correct length for the hoses after all? I had been thinking that they needed to be shortened so that full extension would be at around 90 degrees or maybe a little more. This would allow about 6 inches of hose to be removed and make the front end cleaner looking. So what would you do? What length do you adjust your cable or hose lengths to?

  2. #2
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
    Reputation: Zachariah's Avatar
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    Fronts:
    Turn the bars all the way they can go, to each side and measure with a tape measure. If turning each side measure differently- go with the larger side's length(to be safe). Don't go over that length. Cut hose slowly with a sharp X-acto knife.

    Rears:
    Again, turn bars both ways, while using a tape measure as CLOSE to the frame as possible. Don't go over your measured length. The last thing you want is increased risk of snags. Cut accordingly.
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmacon
    I was considering that the Juicy 5 brake lines that came on my bike needed to be shortened because of the excess hose that sticks out in front of the bars. But then one day I slipped on some wet leaves while climbing an off-camber rock and ended up with one of them falls where you are still on the bike wondering what happened. I noticed that that my front wheel had turned 180 degrees when I fell and that all my lines were then only just at the point of full extension.

    My question then is, is this the correct length for the hoses after all? I had been thinking that they needed to be shortened so that full extension would be at around 90 degrees or maybe a little more. This would allow about 6 inches of hose to be removed and make the front end cleaner looking. So what would you do? What length do you adjust your cable or hose lengths to?
    I you can turn your bars a full 180 then your brake lines are the correct length. It just depends on how far your bars/fork will rotate. My FS bike will do a 180 so the lines and cables are a bit long to accomodate it, my HT will only rotate about 120 or so and the lines and cables are sized accordingly. From the sounds of it I'd leave yours alone.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah
    Cut hose slowly with a sharp X-acto knife.
    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah
    The last thing you want is increased risk of snags.


    Be sure that you use a very sharp blade so the cut can be made as clean as possible... This will ensure that you don't deform the shape of the line which could lead to leaks...

  5. #5
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    Also give some consideration on how you route the cables as well.

    This site is littered with examples of poor straggly cable routing.

    If you are going to spend hundreds on the most bling brakeset on the market, atleast take the time and trouble (and spend the extra few pennies) to properly trim and route the cables. Make them look neat, tidy and as symmetrical as you can.

    And, you don't have to route the cables exactly the same way the manufacturers do it. Remember, their way is to optimise for part dismantling and reassembly of the bike for ease of shipping and not necessarily to reduce cable rub or to reduce the chances of cable ruptures during a crash.

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