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  1. #1
    Rep'n the 905
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    Please school me on rotor differences.

    So I warped my rear rotor (avid hs1 160mm) in a very odd way. Took it to my LBS the mech asked me how the hell I did it, and said he couldnt even straighten it out well enough for it to work proper.

    So I just wanna know must I get the same type of rotor? Or as long as its 160mm with the same bolt pattern I can sub in a different type?

    Is the rotor I warped worth getting a new one or is a rotor a rotor?

    Just wondering because new from my LBS its $50 plus tax for one, I can get one cheaper at CRC etc... but just for my own knowledge I'd like to know.

    Please I got a new wheel set and I was thinking of getting another pair of rotors to keep on the new wheels so I can use my old wheels as a spare set (as complete as possible with rotors, cassette etc...)

  2. #2
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    As long as you keep the same mounting type (6 bolt or centerlock) then you should be able to use any 160mm rotor. Keep in mind that some rotors are thicker than others. I think Magura Storm SL's are 2mm and Avid G2's are about 1.6-1.7mm. With that stated, i have had no issue running Storm SL's on Juicy 3's, 5's, and Formula RX calipers.

  3. #3
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    Warped or bent? Taking a rock or stick in the rotor is more than enough to bend it beyond repair, while warping usually happens from cooling unevenly. No rotor will deal with either particularly well.

  4. #4
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    a rotor is a rotor some are better than other ones don't buy someones too thin I've seen some ashimas bent and you can bent them with the hands stay away from them.
    Ive heard some people said that avid rottors are very good but never tried them

  5. #5
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    i don't think it's quite as simple as that. i believe, and in my experience, the material mix (rotor, brake pads, brake pad backing) is pretty pivotal in terms of wet/dry performance and heat transfer (fading).

  6. #6
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    Park rotor truing fork

    FYI - These work better than an adjustable wrench to straighten a rotor:



    The secret is to bend the center arms - not the braking surface.

  7. #7
    cowbell
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CRchris1996 View Post
    a rotor is a rotor some are better than other ones don't buy someones too thin I've seen some ashimas bent and you can bent them with the hands stay away from them.
    Strange, I run Ashimas on both, my SS, and my FS geared bike, and never had a problem with either. I can break a Ti frame in a couple of minutes, and carbon can shatter catastrophically if it's abused. Should we stay away from those too?

    The trick is picking the right equipment for what you're doing. Bikes are also not tanks, they are precision instruments, and should be treated as such. Ride them hard, but don't apply force in ways that things weren't designed to take force, or they'll bend/break/shatter or otherwise fail.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Strange, I run Ashimas on both, my SS, and my FS geared bike, and never had a problem with either. I can break a Ti frame in a couple of minutes, and carbon can shatter catastrophically if it's abused. Should we stay away from those too?

    The trick is picking the right equipment for what you're doing. Bikes are also not tanks, they are precision instruments, and should be treated as such. Ride them hard, but don't apply force in ways that things weren't designed to take force, or they'll bend/break/shatter or otherwise fail.
    what Im saying is that they are too thin and easily bent or that the ones ive seen.

  9. #9
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    A rotor is a rotor is a rotor, until it isn't. The key thing to look out for is the width of the brake track on the rotor, a Shimano rotor will have a narrower track than a Hayes and Avid rotors will vary depending on the model.

    If the brake track is wider than the original you'll be fine, you just end up with a small unused section of brake rotor which may look a bit weird to some people. For instance I'm running a Hayes rotor with a Shimano brake on my bike and it works just fine. The problem is when you go the other way and run a rotor with a narrower brake track than the original. If you do that you'll get uneven wear and a nice lip on your brake pads, and you may get weird noises, sticky pads, uneven braking, and some other bad things.

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