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  1. #1
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    New question here. Pad Replacements?

    I did an overhaul on my rear brakes (new hayes rotor, new cable, and new bontrager replacment pads) this past weekend. My setup is the Shimano Deore Mechanical (BR-475).
    For some reason the pads and rotor are rubbing badly against eachother, I was hoping they'd adjust after a few rides but they haven't. The compound on these pads looks much different than the original pads but the package didn't specify a material, it just said that they would work with my system.(my mistake) The old pads were resin type. I guess what I am getting at is should I:
    a) look for a different set of pads with less thickness? or different material?
    b) scrape down these pads until they don't rub
    c) adjust something in the caliper (the plate adjustment is backed out all the way) ?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    "El Whatever"
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    Which one of the pads is rubbing???

    The outer or the inner??? Both??

    The compound of the pads has little to do with the rubbing itself. You gotta check for rotors pads and caliper alignment and torque. Also most of the times you take the wheel out the alignment will be lost and you'll have to re-space the pads/rotors.

    How do the pads look like?? The resin type you pretty much know them. The other type is the sintered which looks like pressed graphite (imagine the tip of a pencil). There are other finishes or compund but basically there are only the resin type, the semimetallic type (looks like the resin ones would have some metal chips in them) and the sintered which I described above.
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  3. #3
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    I beleived its the inner...

    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    The outer or the inner??? Both??

    The compound of the pads has little to do with the rubbing itself. You gotta check for rotors pads and caliper alignment and torque. Also most of the times you take the wheel out the alignment will be lost and you'll have to re-space the pads/rotors.

    How do the pads look like?? The resin type you pretty much know them. The other type is the sintered which looks like pressed graphite (imagine the tip of a pencil). There are other finishes or compund but basically there are only the resin type, the semimetallic type (looks like the resin ones would have some metal chips in them) and the sintered which I described above.
    The inner one is rubbing I think, I can't remember and I'm at work now so it might be both. The pads look like pressed graphite. When I asked if the pads would cause the rubbing I meant if the compound was too thick.
    The inner adjustment plate is all the way out, that was the first thing I looked at. What torque do I need to check? I have the outer piston backed all the way out.

    I ordered a new set of Kool Stop today so maybe they will fit into things better.

  4. #4
    "El Whatever"
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    I have no experience with these....

    and no info is available.

    But those should not be so different to the deore mechanicals BR-M515-LA.
    First Check for rotor trueing. Tighten the rotors bolts at specified torque (Shimano 18-35 lbs.in)and make sure to use blue loctite on the rotor bolts threads. Be sure your rotor is properly centered over the hub interface (mounting surface) as some rotors have an inner diameter slightly bigger than shimano hubs.

    Fit the wheel in place and QR very tight. Disc Brakes like that.
    Loosen your cable fixing bolt and then loose the caliper fixing bolts a little so you could move the caliper.
    Get a 0.2mm Feeler Gauge or a bussiness card and insert it between the outer pad (which is fixed to the lever arm I think) and squeeze the rotor between the pads by driving the inner pad inwards.
    Tighten the caliper fixing bolts at specified torque (53-69 lb.in) and remove the card/gauge and back out the inner pad two clicks.
    Now just tighten the cable fixing bolt and remove any cable slack by adjusting with the barrel on the lever.

    You should be done now. In case you feel the outer pad got too far, you can bring it in by adjusting with the barrel adjuster on the caliper but this is not normal procedure.

    I hope it helps... if so, ride your pads until you get rid of them and then change them. Bike pats are expensive enough for just ditching them.
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  5. #5
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    ????

    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    and no info is available.

    But those should not be so different to the deore mechanicals BR-M515-LA.
    First Check for rotor trueing. Tighten the rotors bolts at specified torque (Shimano 18-35 lbs.in)and make sure to use blue loctite on the rotor bolts threads. Be sure your rotor is properly centered over the hub interface (mounting surface) as some rotors have an inner diameter slightly bigger than shimano hubs.

    Fit the wheel in place and QR very tight. Disc Brakes like that.
    Loosen your cable fixing bolt and then loose the caliper fixing bolts a little so you could move the caliper.
    Get a 0.2mm Feeler Gauge or a bussiness card and insert it between the outer pad (which is fixed to the lever arm I think) and squeeze the rotor between the pads by driving the inner pad inwards.
    Tighten the caliper fixing bolts at specified torque (53-69 lb.in) and remove the card/gauge and back out the inner pad two clicks.
    Now just tighten the cable fixing bolt and remove any cable slack by adjusting with the barrel on the lever.

    You should be done now. In case you feel the outer pad got too far, you can bring it in by adjusting with the barrel adjuster on the caliper but this is not normal procedure.

    I hope it helps... if so, ride your pads until you get rid of them and then change them. Bike pats are expensive enough for just ditching them.
    Thanks for the help, it turns out both pads are rubbing, The rotor/hub are lined up correctly. I took apart one side of the caliper (the side that holds the adjustment plate/bolt).
    I am little confused though when you say "loosen the caliper fixing bolts". They had loctite on them so I assume that you must tighten these all the way? Or are these part of the overall adjustment and I can back them out slightly to adjust for the pad thickness.

  6. #6
    "El Whatever"
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    If both pds are rubbing....

    Chances are:

    1 - Caliper incorrectly aligned. If the rotor constantly rubs the same point on the both pads, this can be the cause (in other words, the rotor is straight but the caliper is "crooked").

    2 - Rotor is warped.

    3 - Pads too thick but this a very remote possiblity.

    In case of:

    1 - Yes, just back off the caliper fixing bolts a little. If you want to threadlock (loctite) them (recommended), loosen both just a little to relieve pressure and then pull out completely one, loctite it and put it back in but do not tighten it yet. Repeat with the second. Loctite does not cure instantly so you will have like 5-10 minutes to work on the caliper alignment.
    Now with the caliper "loose" and the inner pad all the way out you'll be certain if the thickness of the pads is the problem (which I really doubt). If this is not the problem just continue and squeeze the rotor by driving in the inner pad. Do not forget the feeler gauge/bussiness card between the outer pad and the rotor. Now you can tighten the caliper fixing bolts to spec torque. After this release the inner pad and remove the gauge/card. Continue the procedure until you're done.

    2 - With the pads close to the rotor, spin the wheel while you check the gap between the rotor and both pads. A white sheet of paper or a white rag on the floor or wall will help you out. Slight misalignments are common and normal. If you have to get the pads so open that you have to squeeze the lever very close to the grip and yet you do not have enough braking power, you really gotta true the rotor. Go to the FAQ on the right side of this screen and follow the truing procedure. It is recommendable to do the caliper alignment stuff after you get the rotors trued. Now, These shitmano rotors (the ones on the cheaper models) rarely warp due to the design and material but it can definitively happen.

    3 - Already answered in 1. Only solution should be sand the pads down on a flat surface but it's not worthy if you can ride a little and get to the LBS.

    Let me know how it turns out... really, let me know.
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  7. #7
    "El Whatever"
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    The caliper fixing bolts are the ones that secure the caliper body to the mounts adapters. Go to Shimano North America website and on Technical info download the Deore Disk Brake Docs.

    The caliper fixing bolts are number 1 on the parts list on the exploded view. I know your brakes are different But the mountings should be equal.

    If you removed anything else but the things I described just put it back as it was!!!

    The adjustments I described are easier than they sound.

    Good Luck and let me know...
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  8. #8
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    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    The caliper fixing bolts are the ones that secure the caliper body to the mounts adapters. Go to Shimano North America website and on Technical info download the Deore Disk Brake Docs.

    The caliper fixing bolts are number 1 on the parts list on the exploded view. I know your brakes are different But the mountings should be equal.

    If you removed anything else but the things I described just put it back as it was!!!

    The adjustments I described are easier than they sound.

    Good Luck and let me know...
    Thanks for the help, I took a harder look at things tonight I am all set. I wasn't aware that there was an adjustment for where the caliper is relative to the dropout ( I thought the pad was the only thing that could change) Thanks again because all I got out of the same post in the beginners forum was "Don't guess".

  9. #9
    "El Whatever"
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    Drop me a line tomorrow...

    I'll try to help you out as much as I can.
    Thanks for the compliment... I'm not worthy!!!!!
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  10. #10
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    Done and Done

    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    I'll try to help you out as much as I can.
    Thanks for the compliment... I'm not worthy!!!!!
    Thanks again for your help.

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