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  1. #1
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    Pad Contact adjustment on codes

    hello, just installed a pair of codes on my bike but there is something I do not like about them.

    When I turn the Pad Contact Adjustment all the way out I still have to pull the lever too far too the handlebar before it builds up pressure. I have to change the reach of my levers because else I wont able to brake because I hit the grips before building up pressure.

    Does annybody experience the same problems on codes or juicys?

  2. #2
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    Sounds like it requires a bleed.

  3. #3
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    This would mean I did the bleeding wrong on both of the brakes. This sounds a bit odd to me.
    Shouldn't the PCP work in the same way as in the juicy's because I also have a juicy ultimate and those brakes I can set up properly.

  4. #4
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    I turned the PCP al the way in, did some braking and then all the way out again. It has improved now. This was with the front brake.

    Before I did that with the front brake I tried to bleed the rear break but I experienced difficulties with that. After pulling al the air out of the caliper with the lever closed I wanted to release the lever but it stayed in the closed position. I pushed it out. After that I wanted to bleed the hose. But when I tried too push the syringe in nothing happened, so I pushed harder and all of the sudden brake fluid squirted past the pistons. So I pushed the pistons back in and put a spacer between them. Then I tried to push the syringe in, and with a lot of effort it came out on the lever side. Then I disconnected the caliper syringe and tried to bleed the lever. But when I pulled the lever nothing would happen(normally you see oil flow in the syringe) But in stead of that the pistons came out again. Also with the oil that came out on the lever side there where small black particles in it.

    I put everything back together and went for a test spin and everything seemed to work. I still cant understand what happened? I only have the brakes for a couple of days. Should I send them back to avid? or is there nothing wrong?

  5. #5
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    I just set up my codes and experienced a similar issue (Because these brakes are downhill specific then run naturally closer to the bars) It is very easy to fix.

    In the avid bleeding instructions it says to dial the lever reach adjustment all the way out. If you do this you are bleeding the brakes with the smallest amount of space for fluid in the system.

    All I did was put the reach adjustment in 3-4 full turns from all the way out. Then when you bleed them more oil is in the system initially. After the bleed is done you can turn the adjusters all the way out and you brakes will engage much sooner. Also before you do any of this take your bike like you are gonna do a wheelie and point it straight up at the sky. When I did this I realized that some air was trapped in the resivior and it came out. My rear brake got a bunch softer and I had to bleed it again.
    Been workin' on bike's since I was 14. I'm 25 now and still don't know everything.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by djamgils
    I turned the PCP al the way in, did some braking and then all the way out again. It has improved now. This was with the front brake.

    Before I did that with the front brake I tried to bleed the rear break but I experienced difficulties with that. After pulling al the air out of the caliper with the lever closed I wanted to release the lever but it stayed in the closed position. I pushed it out. After that I wanted to bleed the hose. But when I tried too push the syringe in nothing happened, so I pushed harder and all of the sudden brake fluid squirted past the pistons. So I pushed the pistons back in and put a spacer between them. Then I tried to push the syringe in, and with a lot of effort it came out on the lever side. Then I disconnected the caliper syringe and tried to bleed the lever. But when I pulled the lever nothing would happen(normally you see oil flow in the syringe) But in stead of that the pistons came out again. Also with the oil that came out on the lever side there where small black particles in it.

    I put everything back together and went for a test spin and everything seemed to work. I still cant understand what happened? I only have the brakes for a couple of days. Should I send them back to avid? or is there nothing wrong?
    If you are having consistent problems with leaks around the pistons I would probably talk to your SRAM rep. Otherwise use my trick to get more oil in the system.
    Been workin' on bike's since I was 14. I'm 25 now and still don't know everything.

  7. #7
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    I am getting a new rear brake. They suspect a o-ring is shred. Could be my fault could be production error. Any way good service.

    In the service manual thes say that you should bleed the brakes without the brake pads in it. This guy told me to do it with the brake pads in place and the spacer inserted. How do you do it?

  8. #8
    Meh.
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    If you have the pads in place, you need to be careful not to get fluid on it. I have a old set of pads that I use to bleed.

    With all of my Juicies I saw some black particles with the first bleed. Didn't think anything of it.

    Yes, you can dial the knob out and intentionally overfill the system.

  9. #9
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    I did my last bleed with the pads in and nothing to space it. Be careful, a couple of things can go very wrong like this. First of all wedge a rag in between the banjo and caliper body right under the bleed screw. That way oil won't dribble down to your pads. More Importantly DO NOT ACCIDENTALLY SQUEEZE THE LEVER. It worked fine for me. No more issues once I got the air out of the resiviour and dialed the pad contact in a bit.
    Been workin' on bike's since I was 14. I'm 25 now and still don't know everything.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Crowley
    I did my last bleed with the pads in and nothing to space it. Be careful, a couple of things can go very wrong like this. First of all wedge a rag in between the banjo and caliper body right under the bleed screw. That way oil won't dribble down to your pads. More Importantly DO NOT ACCIDENTALLY SQUEEZE THE LEVER. It worked fine for me. No more issues once I got the air out of the resiviour and dialed the pad contact in a bit.
    So, is it "dial it in a little for quicker actuation/firmer lever feel" or "dial it out a little for quicker actuation/firmer lever feel"? I understand people's brains make sense of things differently, but so we're clear, which is it?

    When the pads are dialed "in" is seems to me that would increase the system fluid capacity, thereby allowing a little mre fluid to be pumped in, thereby creating a little more of the desired lever pressure.

    Conversely, "out" seems like it would DECREASE the volume. Am I straight on this? I've bled the stupd things like 10 times now, and they still go almost to the grips. Lame.

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