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  1. #1
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    ok so my torque wrench is too big... gotta do it without

    i gotta install my rear brake rotor... rotor says 55 in_lbs, my wrench's minimum is
    120 in_lbs.

    what do i do?

  2. #2
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    Get the right tool for the job, take it to someone w/ the correct tools, or hand tighten @ your own risk.

  3. #3
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    Snug 'em down tight. Don't snap them off. Simple as that.

  4. #4
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    i figured... *sigh* not again...

    money money money money money

    turns out that bikes are more expensive than ATVs...

  5. #5
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    just tighten them.

  6. #6
    Meh.
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    Just snug them up... or you can pick up a cheap torque wrench for 15 bucks.

  7. #7
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    well, i am using loctite.

    how about # of turns? lol

    until i get access to a smaller one i'm just gonna snug em up real good.

    rhanks

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexJK
    i gotta install my rear brake rotor... rotor says 55 in_lbs, my wrench's minimum is
    120 in_lbs.

    what do i do?
    Use a Torx-T25 screwdriver for tightening the rotor bolts. That's what I use for the initial installation, and I find that if I make them pretty tight with the screwdriver, very little additional tightening is needed with the torque wrench. I think it'd still be possible to over-torque the bolts with the screwdriver, but you'll have to work at it.

    It is worth it to get an inexpensive beam-style torque wrench though as it'll be useful for other fasteners on the bike too.

  9. #9
    Meh.
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    Number of turns obviously depends on the length of the bolt... and does not determine torque or thread stretch.

  10. #10
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    well alright, i'm gonna just tighten them up good with the screwdriver and maybe a smidge more with the socket wrench

    Thanks!

  11. #11
    ...idios...
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    Get the right tool for the job, take it to someone w/ the correct tools, or hand tighten @ your own risk.
    Mechanics have managed for decades without using a torque wrench - and how do you think pretty much every trail-side repair ever has been made? Torque wrenches are useful - of that I agree entirely - but they are by no means a mandatory tool, nor do they negate an Allen key or bit/wrench as "correct" tools.

    Being able to judge the correct, or suitable, torque by hand is a skill that absolutely everyone should have if they intend to work on a bike.
    Last edited by SteveUK; 09-01-2009 at 09:38 AM.
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  12. #12
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    Realizing that everyone is different...I've found that getting them snugged up tight by hand with a screwdriver is just about what my torque wrench says is correct. For sure don't over do it.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    Mechanics have managed for decades without using a torque wrench - and how do you think pretty much every trail-side repair ever has been made? Torque wrenches are useful - of that I agree entirely - but they are by no means a mandatory tool, nor do they negate an Allen key or bit/wrench as "correct" tools.

    Being able to judge the correct, or suitable, torque by hand is a skill that absolutely everyone should have if they intend to work on a bike.
    So anyone that works on a bike must become a skilled mechanic ??? Have you ever worked in a shop and seen the number fastners that have been improperly tightened ? Smaller fastners are prone to over tightening by skilled and un skilled wrenches . I don't agree that everyone is going to be or has to be a star mechanic to wrench on a bike, that's why they make tools to get the job done & done right.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    So anyone that works on a bike must become a skilled mechanic ???
    Don't put words in my mouth; I didn't say that.

    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    Have you ever worked in a shop and seen the number fastners (sic) that have been improperly tightened ?
    Yes; I've also seen experienced hands be able to apply perfectly adequate torque into a bolt without using a torque wrench. What's your point?

    I make no mention of people being "star mechanics", quite the contrary, in fact. I'm saying that learning to fasten bolts by hand is a basic skill that everyone who works on their bike should learn.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    Don't put words in my mouth; I didn't say that.



    Yes; I've also seen experienced hands be able to apply perfectly adequate torque into a bolt without using a torque wrench. What's your point?

    I make no mention of people being "star mechanics", quite the contrary, in fact. I'm saying that learning to fasten bolts by hand is a basic skill that everyone who works on their bike should learn.

    "Being able to judge the correct, or suitable, torque by hand is a skill that absolutely everyone should have if they intend to work on a bike.

    Real world call not everyone wants to master the skill of bike repair they just want to slap on parts and ride. I know a hanfull of guys w/ the best intentions but despite reading & lectured repair instructions still botch repairs. Just because someone owns a bike and wants to make repairs doesn't mean they will be good or ever be skilled @ such. I am an auto mechanic by trade & see plenty of DIY's make more work for themselves because they think auto reapir should be easy...easy like bicycles right .

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    Real world call not everyone wants to master the skill of bike repair they just want to slap on parts and ride. I know a hanfull of guys w/ the best intentions but despite reading & lectured repair instructions still botch repairs. Just because someone owns a bike and wants to make repairs doesn't mean they will be good or ever be skilled @ such. I am an auto mechanic by trade & see plenty of DIY's make more work for themselves because they think auto reapir should be easy...easy like bicycles right .
    What?
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

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