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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Are no-name XT Hydro pads a bad idea?

    Hey,

    I found these on ebay http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=190117876977 ,I've asked the seller whether they are fully or semi sintered. Do you think they'll be terrible, $10 shipped is a pretty good price, $15 shipped for two sets.

    Ant other suggestions for inexpensive Pads?

  2. #2
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
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    They look like semi-metallic...especially when they say asbestos free on the package (full sintered metallic pads would have no reason for Asbestos in them) and they mention "all wetter".

    My guess is that they're probably fine...Alligator is another source of brake pads for a good price. Personally, I have stayed with factory pads (though full sintered metallics) with my Hayes brakes because they just plain work and are durable.

  3. #3
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    thanks, any other opinions?

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
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    Only way to know is to find out. These are my observations:

    There used to be only two or three compounds available for brake pads:
    -sintered metallic
    -organic/resin
    -semi-metallic

    Now we're seeing all sorts of grades pop up, such as:

    -ceramic organic blend
    -sintered organic ceramic
    -semi-metallic
    -sintered semi-metallic

    The problem here is it's very hard to tell who's simply making a play on the words and where one can rank the pads. In my experience, I've seen organic, semi-metallic (organic with some metal filler), and metallic, with a much higher metal content. I've seen the semi-metallics being referred to as the organics as well.

    It would be nice if we were supplied friction coefficients so we don't have to guess anymore. Additionally, the companies popping up all over the place, like on ebay, marketing pads of unknown origin are making it even more difficult. In these cases, it's best to hunt around for the best prices on the brand name stuff. For instance, I was looking to try some of these pads for my Hope M4 (uses the same pads as old Shimano 755 xt), but I was referred to some sites that carried them for $14/pad+spring set, even getting a 3.33 discount per pair because I signed up with google checkout.

    For the most part, I have never had good results with aftermarket pads, even if they were the oem manufacturer. They are either thinner, don't last as long, or just come apart. The brand manufacturer tends to put out the best pads available for many cases.

  5. #5
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    I am running some Alligator semi-metallics on the front with my LX hydros and am very pleased. The quality of the pads appeared to be equal if not slightly better than the stock Shimano resin pads. The Alligators are quiet and power seems good.

  6. #6
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    The seller responded to my question in regards to the pads thickness and material. He said that they are "semi-metallic" and that they're as thick as shimano pads. I'm gonna order three sets at $20 shipped. I'll update with their quality.

    Thanks for the opinions.

  7. #7
    Uncle
    Reputation: Entrenador's Avatar
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    Bump -- How did they work?

    I just smoked a set of eBay special brake pads tonight while riding my rigid 29er. They're still in there and they work, but everyone was choking on the fumes when I met my group at the bottom of a hill. So I'm wondering what luck you had with these.
    Thanks.
    Eat, ride, eat, rest, repeat.

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