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  1. #1
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    new to disc brakes, help!!

    i currently have v-brake set-up on my yeti. i want to convert to disc brake or hydraulic braking system. what would you guys recommend as far as 1) best system out there 2) lightest weight 3) best functioning 4) anything else would be greatly appreciated.
    i know i will have to get new wheels and i think i am going to go with chris king hubs with mavic rims. thanks in advance
    craps
    Last edited by crapsneleven; 02-06-2004 at 11:17 PM. Reason: spelling error/"just didnt read right"

  2. #2
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    jsut my opinion

    it sounds like you have a fair amount of funds (king hubs with mavic, good choice) so i would suggest the avid juicy seven. I personally cannot afford them on my bike but have demoed them many a time at the shops and even rode my buddies bike on them, beautiful design and function!

  3. #3
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    I would suggest................

    ..........suggest that you do a whole load of research yourself on this question as there are many varaibles and not many (any?) bad brakes out there anymore.

    Mtbr.com was started because of people like yourself. The main word in mtbr is "review" and there are tons of reviews on many brakes. You will only get a tiny fraction of those opinions here.

    Our friend here who only mentions the Juicys leaves out many good brakes while just mentioning a brake that has about three months of track record.


    1) best system out there 2) lightest weight 3) best functioning 4)
    There is no "best" as a generalization. There are some "best" for specific purposes or specific features but we don't know what's important to *you*. And as you're asking these questions, probably you don't either.

    Lightest weight - the lightest are the Formula B4 Pro+ and the Magura Marta. One of the highest regarded brakes is the Avid cable disc but this happens to also be the heaviest. Go figure. I guess this means that weight isn't that important.

    Best functioning - they're all quite good but nothing is perfect for everyone. Read the reviews for many opinions there.

    Read our FAQ at the top right of the Brakes forum to get an overall view.

    Mike T. (mcm # 717)

  4. #4
    Riding free's the mind
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    If this helps

    I also was new to discs & decided that the Juicy Seven's were the way to go. But at the time (last summer) the production release was delayed so I decided to go with Avid Mechanicals as a temporary solution. To my pleasant surprise, the Avid mechs turned out to be some of the best brakes I've ever used- power, modulation and best feature of all- it's easy to adjust and maintain.

    Though I'd probably go hydraulic at some point, it's amazing how much of a performance improvement discs make whether you go mechanical or hydraulic. Gone are the brake fades during a long fast descent, and the grinding from mud & dust between the vbrake pads and rim.

  5. #5
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    ride what works

    just for the record, i run avid mechs on both my mtn bikes and love them, low maintenance, cheap, and great performance. please do the research out there and try different systems. By all means do not go solely on what you read here, find what suits you best and have fun!

  6. #6
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    I think the only one of your 3 concerns mentioned that's really relavent...

    Quote Originally Posted by crapsneleven
    i currently have v-brake set-up on my yeti. i want to convert to disc brake or hydraulic braking system. what would you guys recommend as far as 1) best system out there 2) lightest weight 3) best functioning 4) anything else would be greatly appreciated.
    i know i will have to get new wheels and i think i am going to go with chris king hubs with mavic rims. thanks in advance
    craps
    ...is that you'd prefer them to be light. I suggest narrowing down some of the lighter ones and find which conveniences, or inconveniences each have, and decide for you as a new disc brake owner, which would be easiest to cope with. You must be realistic however, if you are above average weight, and plan on doing some riding that involves long fast descents, you may want to look at a set that is 180 front, and 160 rear, rotor size. Some brakes are adaptable to bigger rotor sizes, some that focus on light weight XC specific riding are not (Marta). As mentioned, there are many good brakes out now, and most have their different little peculiar traits that must be learned about for proper setup and maintenence.
    Some of the other differences you will learn about include:

    1) shimmed vs slotted or conical washer caliper mounts
    2) mineral oil vs DOT hydraulic fluid
    3) retaining springs/clips vs magnetic pad holders
    4) open vs closed systems
    5) hydraulic vs cable systems
    6) round vs wavy rotors
    7) availability of parts
    8) quality of customer service
    9) warranty period
    10) pad compounds available and manufacturer's restrictions
    11) 1.7-1.8mm rotor thickness vs 2mm (often overlooked I think)
    12) price of replacement parts
    13) left/right lever options (swappable on some)
    14) lever adjustment features
    15) race support (if this applies to you)

    There may be others I missed, but this and a thorough reading of the brake FAQ will get you started. I whole heartedly agree that getting to know your brake system is essential, not just for convenience sake but your personal saftey on the trail, should a problem arise. There are plenty of ways to support your LBS, without forgoing the discipline of learning your bike's most important safety feature.

  7. #7
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    Everyone is giving you great advice.

    But that's not what you want to hear: Get the hope mono mini that's what I'm going to do!

    I've read everything I can get my hands on (the Disc Brake FAQ on this site is hands down the most comprehensive source), perused the reviews, and kept tabs on the discussion boards for a few months and I'm going with Hope. I'm looking for a "light" brake for a light (130 lb) rider who does heavy duty xc riding. I get uncomfortable with a component if it's got a decent number of reviews and isn't rated 4+ chilis (assuming the reviews all seem legit.). Many of the brake manufacturers' products are hit and miss by this standard. Hope doesn't have a brake product rated under four chilis. Come to think of it, they might not have ANY product rated under four chilis. That kind of consistent quality makes me want to go with one of their systems.

    Having said that, I've demo'd one set of disc brakes and I can't even remember what they were. So you gotta wonder how I can feel like I'm in a position to give anyone advice in this area. Hope it helps.

    Zizzle

  8. #8
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    P.s.

    What difference does a wavy vs non-wavy rotor make?

  9. #9
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    ... and if we just ... not much..

    Quote Originally Posted by Zizzle to the Tizzle
    What difference does a wavy vs non-wavy rotor make?
    But it is surposed to make mud disapear faster with a wavy rotor. Also they look pretty cool. Although I don't know all the reasons, I'd imagine it's not such a huge deal, but worth considering. One brake you might not want to get for now, is the shimano XTR, alot of people seem to be having a sticky pistion problem with them.

  10. #10
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    Wavies allow for alot of edge surface to keep the pad clean,

    Quote Originally Posted by Zizzle to the Tizzle
    What difference does a wavy vs non-wavy rotor make?
    ...though many consider it to be just a different method than holes in the rotor's rim. The main difference with holes on this regaurd, is that holes don't let the dirt escape like the rotors edges do. It's been said that they run less hot as well, but I've read no testing done on this. Charles of Hammerhead says the Marta wavy rotor is more powerfull than their previous round ones. There can be a minor nuisance associated with some wavies, being pad chatter caused by rough edges on the rotor. This can be easily remedied with a little filing of the rotor's edge. One of the most unique rotor shapes going right now, is unlike typical round or wavy rotors pictured below from the new Hope Mono Mini. If you look close, the rotor rim's inner edge has a slant on it, so that each section of brake track between the rotor's spokes starts out narrow, then gets wider. Hope also offers a choice of custom laser cut rotor shapes that the buyer can submit for an upcharge.

    Last edited by Gnarlygig; 02-11-2004 at 05:14 AM.

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