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  1. #1
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    New BB7 Owner....

    I have a 2010 GF Cobia, which came with FR5 levers and BB5s, which left alot to be desired.

    After much research (thanks to this awesome forum) I decided to go with BB7s. I was on the fence about going to Hydros, but due to cost, ease of maintenance and consistency, I stuck with cable.

    I ordered the BB7s 160 f/r, Jagwire Ripcords and SD7 SL levers.

    The brakes came in first, I quickly ran home and threw them on, man what a difference in ease of adjustibility. Now granted they're not completely bedded in yet, and it may be just my mind palying tricks on me, but I feel a big difference. Part of it I feel is due in part that I just didn't have confidence in my BB5s and that affected me as a rider.

    Hopefully the cables and levers come in today of tomorrow, then I can feel the True greatness of BB7s.

    I left the front 185 roundagon on and only switched the back 160 roundagon to a g2 cs. So if anyone wants to trade a 160 g2 cs for a 185 g2 cs, shot me a pm.

    I'm 6'1 210lbs (I was 232 when I started mt biking in feb)

    Thanks to all the authors of great posts in this section regarding Brakes, pros/cons and the awesome reviews. This forum has helped me make, what I feel is the correct decision and hopefully become a more confident (read faster) rider.

    Thanks
    Chris

  2. #2
    Mountain Man Dan
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    How much did you get the BB7's for?
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  3. #3
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    I think I paid between $60-$70 a side.(reciept at home) These are the 2011 BB7s. I didn't mind paying a lilttle extra to deal with LBS. (I know, I know I saw the 2009 BB7s on diff websites for like $40-50 a side and I saw the $120 total package deal also)

  4. #4
    Mountain Man Dan
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    Is there any difference between a couple year old bb7's and 2011's?
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  5. #5
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    I think a few differences, but nothing major.
    70 or so grams lighter (328g vs 395g)
    knobs a little beefier/easier to turn
    come with g2 cleansweeps instead of roundagons (2008 I believe)

    Looking tograb a set dan?

  6. #6
    Mountain Man Dan
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    I already have g2 clean sweeps, I have b b5's now and they SUCK. I think the rotors are some of the issue but whatever.

    Yeah, I might get some!
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  7. #7
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    The BB5s for me just... well they constantly needed adjusting and just didn't inspire confidence in late corner braking.

    BB7s feel more stout. It could be the mind game though like when you trade your used car in for a brand new one, the new one could break down also, but you have more faith in it.

    We'll see only time will tell.

  8. #8
    Mountain Man Dan
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    All mine to s vibrate and make noise. I think these rotors might be bad. I'm kinda checking out the wind cutter rotors.
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  9. #9
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
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    Quote Originally Posted by XxRedbaronxX
    but I feel a big difference.
    It's in your head. The BB7's offer no better braking than the BB5's, all you get is easier set up and less maintenance.


    Its not opinion, its Physics.
    Trouble getting your BB5/BB7's set up, try this method

  10. #10
    Master of Disaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverTail
    Its not opinion, its Physics.
    If physics was as simple in real life as it is in theory we wouldn't have nearly as many product recalls or mechanical failures. Serious and thoughtful engineers miss subtle yet crucial aspects of physics all the time. How certain are you that all the many differences between the caliper and pads on the BB5 vs BB7 make no real-world difference?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverTail
    It's in your head. The BB7's offer no better braking than the BB5's, all you get is easier set up and less maintenance.


    Its not opinion, its Physics.
    Really physics would also lead me to believe that a larger braking surface on the brake pads would lend to creating more friction by acting on a larger surface are of the rotor, hence more stopping power.

    I tried your link in your sig on my BB5's when I had them and they could never reproduce the braking power of a BB7.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverTail
    It's in your head. The BB7's offer no better braking than the BB5's, all you get is easier set up and less maintenance.


    Its not opinion, its Physics.
    Well I'll tell you this, if I all I had to do was spend $100 to gain confidence and satisfaction, I wouldn't have spent all the money I did in college on beer to get chicks!!! LOL

    I paid for them, I am happy with them. Nothing Else Matters (I can never say that phrase without singing the Metallica song. )

  13. #13
    Master of Disaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by tussery
    Really physics would also lead me to believe that a larger braking surface on the brake pads would lend to creating more friction by acting on a larger surface are of the rotor, hence more stopping power.
    But the same mechanical leverage applied over a larger area also means less pressure at the pad-rotor interface. More area under less pressure might yield more friction and it might not depending on a bunch of variables. Hard to say though if it is the same mechanical leverage being applied - different torque arms, different splines, different caliper body flex, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverTail
    The BB7's offer no better braking than the BB5's
    There sure are a lot of people who believe that BB7's work a lot better than BB5's. It's difficult to write all those opinions off as mass hysteria. If small pads worked just as well as larger ones, why wouldn't more Avid brakes use the smaller and lighter pads of the BB5?

  14. #14
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    Welcome to the clan. Money well spent. Congrats on the weight loss too.

    I keep being really tempted to get hydros. But my BB7's just keep pleasing.

    As for Alligator Windcutters... I have them and like them. Slow speed braking causes my rigid fork to shudder some, but doesn't really bother me during actual riding. Get 180mm adapters if you use 185mm Avid rotors now. I took out a CPS washer to get the right distance, but that's really a hack that I should fix...

  15. #15
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clones123
    If physics was as simple in real life as it is in theory we wouldn't have nearly as many product recalls or mechanical failures. Serious and thoughtful engineers miss subtle yet crucial aspects of physics all the time. How certain are you that all the many differences between the caliper and pads on the BB5 vs BB7 make no real-world difference?
    Surface area is not in the equation for friction, which negates the pads. The BB7's are more rugged, better build quality and flex less. Internally, they basically have the same function, except the outboard portion of the BB7's. The BB7's also need a hell of a lot less maintenance. But I have had both before (BB5 then and BB7 now) and the braking power is equal when both are set up properly.


    Quote Originally Posted by tussery
    Really physics would also lead me to believe that a larger braking surface on the brake pads would lend to creating more friction by acting on a larger surface are of the rotor, hence more stopping power.

    I tried your link in your sig on my BB5's when I had them and they could never reproduce the braking power of a BB7.

    Would it? Amontons second law says differently, it is negated. http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae140.cfm

    Quote Originally Posted by XxRedbaronxX
    Well I'll tell you this, if I all I had to do was spend $100 to gain confidence and satisfaction, I wouldn't have spent all the money I did in college on beer to get chicks!!! LOL

    I paid for them, I am happy with them. Nothing Else Matters (I can never say that phrase without singing the Metallica song. )


    They are better brakes, no doubt about it. I even upgraded and the maintenance or lack there of is what is the real benefit. BB5's need constant attention, where as the BB7's need almost none. The BB7's are also more rugged or stout like you claimed.

    I just try and let new bike owners know that the differences will not be night and day like many people think. The BB5's just tend to be hard to set up properly and somehow come out of true all the time. If you are of a normal weight, this becomes less likely. When you are a fat boy like myself, I put extreme force on my calipers, so every ride with the BB5's needed adjustment. BB7's haven't been adjusted in almost 7 months.
    Trouble getting your BB5/BB7's set up, try this method

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverTail
    Surface area is not in the equation for friction, which negates the pads.

    But I have had both before (BB5 then and BB7 now) and the braking power is equal when both are set up properly.

    Would it? Amontons second law says differently, it is negated. http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae140.cfm
    An object weighs 10 lb and one side has an area of 10 inches, the other side has an area of 1 inch. The side with 10 inches of area has the 10lb weight evenly spread at 1lb per inch. The side with 1 inch of area has 10lb of weight spread on 1 inch.
    Physics say that that the friction forces on the 2 different areas is the same because its the same weight that's spread on them.

    BB7's have larger pads then BB5's

    A bigger pad does not apply more pressure, only the same pressure over a bigger area.

    Say a BB5 pad is 1 inch and a BB7 pad is 2 inches and say 10lb of lever pressure is exerted to both pads, the 1 inch BB5 pad would have 10lbs of pressure per inch on it while the 2 inch BB7 pad would only have 5lbs of pressure per inch over the 2 inches even though it has 10lbs of pressure on it.

    The size of the pad does matters in terms of heat capacity and wear rate. A larger pad will absorb more initial heat and has better wear characteristics.

    Pad Fade - When the temperature at the interface between the pad and the disc exceeds the thermal capacity of the pad, the pad loses friction capability mainly due to out-gassing of binder (matrix) materials in the pad compound and results in a decrease of brake power. The brake lever remains firm and solid but the brake will not generate the normal amount of power and the bike will not stop no matter how hard you pull on the lever.

    Thermal Mass – A brake system must be sized appropriately to not only be able to provide enough power for a vehicle, but have enough material mass to properly handle the temperatures during braking applications. Removing material from a system to reduce size and weight also removes material that would otherwise have helped a system absorb and diffuse heat generated by braking.

    Surface Area – The more surface area available on a brake system, the better heat dissipation will be via convection.


    I wouldn't say that the BB5 & BB7 have the same braking power & I know which brake I'd rather have going down a big hill.

    Avid 'Downhill' brakes: http://www.sram.com/avid/category/307




    .
    Last edited by cobba; 09-15-2010 at 11:31 PM.

  17. #17
    Master of Disaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobba
    Interesting that Avid lists the BB5 and BB7 together in all brake categories but the Juicy-series are absent from each of the categories requiring high-performance braking.

  18. #18
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    Lol i paid 105 a piece for my bb7s =/ erg

  19. #19
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    I am going to ditch the tektros for some bb7's as well, just trying to decide if I want to spend the extra $50 on 2010 versus 2009 models but if I can get the 2011 from my LBS for about $130-140 with the G2 cleansweeps thats a winner.
    Hardrock 29er, Niner EMD9, Cannondale F29, Camber Expert, 650b Nickel all gone.
    2014 Giant Anthem 27.5 here.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by madsedan
    I am going to ditch the tektros for some bb7's as well, just trying to decide if I want to spend the extra $50 on 2010 versus 2009 models but if I can get the 2011 from my LBS for about $130-140 with the G2 cleansweeps thats a winner.
    You should prob get 185/185 g2 cs and then trade me a 185 for a nib 160

  21. #21
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    I'm also shopping for new brakes and been looking for BB7's since I'm not that hard core... yet. So are the SD7 SL levers the recommended levers for the BB7? Or can you pair up any kind of lever that is suited for a mechanical brake?

  22. #22
    IdontShootPeopleAnyMore
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    What mountain bike forum do pirates use? .....



    MTB-arrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundom66
    I'm also shopping for new brakes and been looking for BB7's since I'm not that hard core... yet. So are the SD7 SL levers the recommended levers for the BB7? Or can you pair up any kind of lever that is suited for a mechanical brake?
    Most any v-brake lever can be used. I use regular SD7's and they are fine for me. The SL's are more expensive and way a tiny bit less. The cheapest Avid levers are FR5's, and I imagine those are good too, though not as adjustable.

    Lots of people also like Paul's Love Levers, or XTR's. But you don't need to think about it so much.

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