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  1. #1
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    Need new XT hub: disc-compatible vs non-disc

    Hi all,

    I need to replace the rear (Coda) hub on my vintage-ish Cannondale. This is a late-90's bike, from when disk brakes were not too common. I *think* it has bosses on the swingarm for a caliper, so I figure I might want to put disks on it when I'm feeling bored/wealthy.

    If I'm going to run V-brakes for now, is there any reason *not* to use the disk-compatible XT hub? I assume it's a bit heavier, but are there any other negatives?

  2. #2
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    The offset of the hub flanges. The non-disc has a wider flange spacing, so it can build a stronger wheel.

  3. #3
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    No reason not to....

    as long as you don't mind the weight difference, 496g for 6 bolt disc hub, 455 for non-disc.
    It's even becomming more common to see disc hubs on bikes that aren't speced with disc brakes from the major manufacturers. This is one area that I believe bike manufacturers are actually doing the customer a service. Not having to get a new wheel set or as a minimum hubs takes a quite a bit of the sting out of upgrading to disc brakes. So go for it. The only down side is disc hubs do tend to cost a bit more than their non-disc counterparts (if there is one), but usually it's only by $10 or so. But if you have any intention of upgrading to discs in the future you'd be ahead of the game going with disc hubs.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
    Linoleum Knife
    Reputation: forkboy's Avatar
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    snip...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    The offset of the hub flanges. The non-disc has a wider flange spacing, so it can build a stronger wheel.
    I've always wondered about this and right now I believe the opposite-- rear disc hubs can be built stronger because there is less dish. The non drive side tension can be higher.

    I recognize that the wider flanges matter but doesn't dishing and spoke tension count too? I'm really curious.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the info, everyone. I guess I'll just go with whatever proves cheapest. :-) Since I live in a dry environment, disc brakes aren't a very high priority for me.

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