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  1. #1
    Master of Sound
    Reputation: hyebyker's Avatar
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    New question here. my brakes always rub...

    i have a set of hayes mx4 mechanical disc brakes on a 2007 diamondback response sport. they work fine, but the pads always end up rubbing against the rotor. usually its not much and doesn't affect anything. however, adjusting them never fixes it. is this just normal? im seriously considering buying some hydraulic brakes that automatically adjust. something else i noticed is that when i put my wheel back on, i have to keep the wheel straight or the brakes rub really bad and prevent the wheel from spinning freely(i quick release). its very annoying

  2. #2
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    it could be either flex in the fork or your rotors aren't straight.

    In ideal conditions, nothing will ever hit the brake. If you can hear it while riding, I think its rubbing too much. Sometimes my brakes hits a tiny bit if you pick up the front wheel and spin, but if you ride you can't even notice or hear it so It doesn't matter.

  3. #3
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    Other than what taikuodo stated, you may want to check the pads also. My BB7s are hit and miss. Sometimes when I take off the wheels (for whatever reasons), and I put them back on, it'll slightly change the fit. Last night, after changing rotors in the rear, I could not for the life of me get it to straighten out. And the rotor was new! Then I realized that my pads were worn and the wear was uneven. I put in new pads and voila!

  4. #4
    wyrd bi ful rd
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    Just check that your rotors are not warped ... and that they are centered over the caliper and that the pads are not unevenly worn ...

    Usually I remove the calipers when I remove the wheel and will put them on again after i have installed the wheel .... and I usually install the wheel with the bike upside down just so that I can ensure that the axel is all the way into the slots and fitting comfortably ... gravity helping me there ... make sure that the QR is tight that it leaves a make on your palm ...

    But that is just me being picky ...

  5. #5
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    Since these are post mount calipers, these are easy to align, as long as your rotors are not bent. Loosen the bolts that mount the caliper to the posts, squeeze the brake lever and tighten the bolts while you are still on the brakes.Don't go easy on the bolts, either. Make sure you get 'em cranked down. Lemme know if this works for you!

  6. #6
    Master of Sound
    Reputation: hyebyker's Avatar
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    I'll have to check my rotors/pads, but they should be ok.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtb_crzd47
    Loosen the bolts that mount the caliper to the posts, squeeze the brake lever and tighten the bolts while you are still on the brakes.
    dont know if this will work because only one of my pads moves. its some weird thing with Hayes brakes i think. I will try it though.

    thanks a bunch guys.

  7. #7
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    To center the caliper: loosen the two bolts that attach the caliper to the adapter, pump the levers a few times, squeeze and hold the lever, while holding the lever alternately tighten the two bolts while making sure that the caliper does not shift (they should be tight but do not "crank" them down). Release the lever, spin the wheel. Check which pad it is rubbing on. If it is rubbing on the side closest to the spokes, there's an allen bolt on that side of the caliper. Turn the bolt counter clockwise to move the pad further away (you want this pad as close as possible without rubbing). If the outside pad is rubbing, you can adjust the pad position with the cable tension,.

    Most mechanical disc brakes (and the Hayes So1e hydraulic) only have a single dynamic piston.

    Read the disc brake FAQ about how to true your rotors if necessary. All it takes is a bit of patience and a little persuasion.

    Make sure your wheel is completely in the dropouts and that the QR is nice and tight. Be sure to use a quality QR. I like the Shimano QRs and the DT Swiss ratcheting skewers. When you take out your wheel and put it back in, if the QR is not tightened to the exact same torque it was before it will cause the hub to sit slightly differently in the dropouts. Given the very little clearance in the caliper and the lever between the hub and the edge of the rotor (a small side to side displacement at the axle is translated to a larger movement at the edge of the rotor)... it doesn't take much to get rubbing.

  8. #8
    wyrd bi ful rd
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  9. #9
    Master of Sound
    Reputation: hyebyker's Avatar
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    duh, stupid me. that worked perfect. all problems fixed!

    thanks again

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