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  1. #1
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    Is my Avid BB7 brake broke?

    I was cleaning out my brakes and rotors today and I came across a slight problem. I removed the brake pads in my front BB7s and was trying to put them back in... I turned the outer adjustment knob, and the small round piece inside the brake popped loose- the piece that sits behind the brake pad and pushes it into the rotor when you squeeze the lever. I can't get it to go back in for the life of me.... is this thing broken? If it is, do they warranty this kind of thing? It basically fell off without any kind of force or jolting.

    Some pics (you can see the round piece in the middle, when it should be up flush with the side of the brake).



    This shows it better- the bottom of the round piece was once sticking into the hole below it:

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
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    No, you just dialed the pressure foot out too far. The instructions on how to reseat it are on the SRAM website, get the technical manual here http://sram.com/en/service/avid/tech_manuals.php, it's in there....(and it's not all that involved, but I'll just let you read for yourself).
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
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  3. #3
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    Yup they're supposed....

    to be able to do that. Check out the tech manual, you'll be amazed at how far the caliper can be stripped down. And as long as you're at that point you may as well tear it down the rest of the way and clean and service the internals while your at it. Nothing teaches you more about your components and how they work than taking care of them yourself!

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
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    Nope, it was broken- that small round piece had an end to it that kept it inside the caliper, but it apparently snapped off. If anyone wants a super cheap BB7 front caliper, shoot me a PM.

  5. #5
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    How about a photo of the broken part? The first photos seem to show everything intact...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
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  6. #6
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    See the part in the middle of the brake that's round with the post coming out from one side (the only silver-colored piece in the picture)? That isn't attached to anything- its completely loose. It WAS stuck down in the hole, attached to something, but apparently it broke off or came un-attached somehow.

    Looking at the SRAM owners manual on their website, it appears as though it should be attached to another piece that sticks down into that hole and into several washers and other parts.... but it broke.

  7. #7
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    If you push that piece back into its hole and turn the red knob on the outside it won't thread back in? Turn the knob clockwise.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  8. #8
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    Nope, there's nothing to thread.... it isn't a screw. It has a ball bearing in the end of it (per the manual), and it appears to have been attached to some other part- but there's no way its just popping or screwing back into anything.

  9. #9
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    So this doesn't apply? (from the troubleshooting advice in the technical manual):

    The most common issue with the BB7 is that the
    outboard pressure foot can become dislodged if
    the outboard adjustment knob is turned too far
    clockwise without the rotor in the caliper (wheel
    off or caliper removed). The brake is not broken,
    nor does it require disassembly to replace the
    pressure foot. To replace the pressure foot, turn
    the outboard adjuster knob counter-clockwise
    until it stops. If the knob doesn’t stop, then the
    foot screw (the end of which can be seen in the
    center of the knob) has become disengaged
    from the knob and possibly from the threads
    inside the drive cam. In this case, remove the
    knob, then using a pair of small needle-nosed
    pliers or a schrader valve tool, turn the the foot
    screw all the way back out until it stops. Now
    the pressure foot can be replaced. Relocate the
    pressure foot into the bore, then give it a firm
    push in the center. It will click back into place.
    If you removed the knob, replace it and you're done.
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  10. #10
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    Bikini- that was it. THanks a TON. I guess the shop guy didn't know what the hell he was talking about.

  11. #11
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    If you had just read the manual you wouldn't have had to talk to a shop guy...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
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  12. #12
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    The sections I read showed me how to take the caliper apart- from that, it looked like something came undone or snapped.... oh well. Now I have an extra brake caliper in case anything happens.

  13. #13
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    Time to get a new shop guy. Seriously. And when someone on the internet tells you that nothing is wrong and to read the manual, what can it hurt? The fact is, an LBS mechanic has NOT seen everything there is to see in bikes, and there will always be at least 1000 people on the internet who have seen your exact problem. Why ask in an internet forum at all if your just going to blow off the answers?

    For things like bikes, the cumulative internet knowledge is extensive. Use it wisely, learn, and you wont need the LBS any more.

  14. #14
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    FYI- I didn't just blow it off.... I just didn't ask until after I took it to the shop and had it replaced. Unfortunately, I had to get it fixed quickly so I could ride on Wednesday. Oh well, lesson learned.

    And yes, I'll be taking my stuff to another shop from now on. Its too bad because I know the guy who owns it- but that's the second thing they've screwed up this year.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by smmokan
    And yes, I'll be taking my stuff to another shop from now on. Its too bad because I know the guy who owns it- but that's the second thing they've screwed up this year.
    Build up some good Karma, and take that section of manual into the shop and let the owner and the technician know that they missed something. It may help the next person that comes in to that shop with a similar problem. They won't know they were wrong unless you tell them (in a nice way of course).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife View Post
    So this doesn't apply? (from the troubleshooting advice in the technical manual):

    The most common issue with the BB7 is that the
    outboard pressure foot can become dislodged if
    the outboard adjustment knob is turned too far
    clockwise without the rotor in the caliper (wheel
    off or caliper removed). The brake is not broken,
    nor does it require disassembly to replace the
    pressure foot. To replace the pressure foot, turn
    the outboard adjuster knob counter-clockwise
    until it stops. If the knob doesn’t stop, then the
    foot screw (the end of which can be seen in the
    center of the knob) has become disengaged
    from the knob and possibly from the threads
    inside the drive cam. In this case, remove the
    knob, then using a pair of small needle-nosed
    pliers or a schrader valve tool, turn the the foot
    screw all the way back out until it stops. Now
    the pressure foot can be replaced. Relocate the
    pressure foot into the bore, then give it a firm
    push in the center. It will click back into place.
    If you removed the knob, replace it and you're done.
    Just an FYI... five years later I ran into the same problem. The above didn't work for me exactly, but did let me know I hadn't broken the brake. I put a wrench in between the pressure feet and pulling the brake lever did the trick!

    Thanks MTBR!

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