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  1. #1
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    magura louise FR leverl feel question

    Hello all,

    I've installed my magura 04 FR brakes and have a curious question. I installed them a few days ago and admittedly haven't had a chance to really break them in riding (that's what happens when you live in ND in march). However I'm leaving on a trip tomorrow so if they are definately not right I will take my backup bike and address the issue when I get back.

    Anyway, the levers feel really soft to me and I'm wondering if it's just because discs have more modulation or if I'm getting a lot of air in them somewhere. They both feel about the same but once the pads contact the disc the lever firms up but the pressure does not seem to ramp up quickly and I can pretty much get the lever to the grips wtihout a ton of effort, the problem is I don't know how much braking force it's producing. I guess I'm comparing them to like my HS33 brakes where the pads hit the rim you get a little give but the lever pressure ramps up very fast with little lever movement. These feel more mushy after the pads hit the disc pretty much like HS33's with a lot of air in them. Is that normal for these disc brakes?

    I've bled them like 4 times, twice using the included 04' bleeding proceedure and twice using the magura faq page tips and such. The first time I had to refill them totally since I went to the magura stainless lines but the second two times I got no air coming up to the resevoir at all. They've pretty much had the same lever feel so I'm just wondering if that's a modulation thing or if I need to keep trying to get more air out of them.

    Also I know that with HS33's a trick was to let air accumulate at the lever since it's the highest point on the bike, then you could lean it over and just slowly refill the lever through the bleed tube hole. Is it possible to do the same with the discs just remove the resevoir cover and top it off and replace?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Bodhisattva
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    You got air.

    Sorry Todd. You've got air in the system. Under no circumstances should the lever come to the bar and it should have a firm end-feel. The mushiness is not what we mean by modulation.

    I haven't checked out Mike's MCM bleed tips recently, but here are a few of my own.

    - make sure the bolts on the caliper are completely vertical
    - make sure the pads are pistons are pushed all the way in when beginning
    - keep the bleed syringe vertical to keep the oil down & air up. I velcro mine to a workstand
    - when bleeding, tap the caliper & line several times with a wood handled screwdriver to help dislodge any bubbles
    - bleed regularly, then reverse bleed using the push/pull method. squeeze the brake lever which will force fluid back through the system & into the syringe. Don't let oil in the reservoir run dry or you'll need to start all over. Then bleed conventionally again, then reverse, then conventional. For the sake of thoroughness I bleed in each direction 3 times. Only take a few more minutes
    - when done, put the reservoir cap back on but don't screw it down. Hold it with your finger and push fluid through again. Air bubbles sometimes get trapped under the reservoir and they will get purged out through the tiny escape hole.
    - screw the cap on and CAREFULLY put the pads back into the caliper. Place the rotor between the pads and push fluid through. You will meet resistance and eventually see the pads contact the reservoir. This ensures the maximum amount of fluid in the system. Remove pads, remove bleed syringe and finish up.

    Hope this helps. It sounds anal but works every time.
    “Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”

    ― Albert Einstein

  3. #3
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    That's what I was afraid of, I guess I will take the spare bike because that's pretty much the proceedure I've been doing. Even the reverse bleeding, keeping the seringe upward, tapping the caliper/lines, squeezing fluid out when replacing the resevoir cap etc, replacing the pads and putting a disc in there to get max fluid. I guess I haven't done them 3 times each way when doing it, but man there must be a good amount of trapped air somewhere in there.

    Thanks

    Todd

  4. #4
    Bodhisattva
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    Yup....

    Yup, them little buggers can be tenacious.
    I always do the procedure multiple times, even if I'm not seeing air, because it's still quicker & easier then setting up the whole process if I fail.
    Keep at it. You'll get it. I only work on Maggies, but if it's any consolation several "pros" tell me Maggies are the easiest brakes to bleed ( I shudder when I think of the alternative).
    “Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”

    ― Albert Einstein

  5. #5
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    Welp I don't know what the problem is but I just spent the last 2 hours working on them again, no change. Lets see that's a total of probably 8 hours spent trying to get these things bled.

    I can't believe it has to be this difficult, I've bled dozens of motorcycle brakes and probably a dozen different sets of HS33's and I've never had anything even close to these kind of problems.

    Well I said to heck with it and took the bike outside to ride it, after a little break in I don't think they will be bad, they easily lock up the tires now without much effort, I think I'm just used to having my HS33's set up super touchy with brake boosters, so once you hit the rim it gets super stiff super fast. These seem to have a little more give in the lever once you start braking but require less effort to get the power. I guess we shall see, if they don't work I hope there's a shop in moab that can bleed em Have to stop by dreamride.
    Last edited by ToddM; 03-12-2004 at 07:57 AM.

  6. #6
    Bodhisattva
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    Break-in...

    The pads do have to break in & 25 hard stops ought to do it.
    The lever feel will become more distinct, but the levers should not come to the bar under any circumstances. If that's happening then you either have air in the system or something else is wrong.

    Have a good trip & let me know how it turns out.
    “Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”

    ― Albert Einstein

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