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  1. #1
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    lubed up brakes! :-(

    So I already read this thread, but have a new question:
    I accidentally got Tri-Flow on my brakes. Now I can't stop very well at all. I've been told I need to get new pads, as there's no way of removing the lubricant from the pads, but that I can just clean the discs. What should I clean them with, disc brake cleaner, denatured alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, soapy water?

    Also is there any hope for my pads? They aren't that old, shame to have to scrap them already.

    FYI, I ride a fully stock 2011 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR 29er comp (XXL). That means Avid Elixir-R SL brakes & 203/185 rotors.

    Thanks for any tips/help!

  2. #2
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    I use isopropyl alcohol. You could try sanding down the pads, maybe.

  3. #3
    gran jefe
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    you could try baking the pads. see if a search pulls up anything. search for oven pads.

  4. #4
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    If you just got a little *tiny* bit of lube on the pads, you can try sanding them, otherwise, they're toast. Even if you sand them and they work at first, they'll start squealing again and they'll never have the braking power they used to. I've never tried the oven-baked method. One thing I'd be concerned about is cooking the glue that adheres the pad to the metal backing. The danger would be damaging that glue, then riding the bike without knowing it. When you'd grab a hand full of brake, the pads would break free of the glue, and you wouldn't have any brakes at all.

    As far as cleaning your rotors, you can use pretty much anything that doesn't leave a residue. Isopropyl alcohol works well. I'm a fan of Finish Line Speed Clean myself.
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  5. #5
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    Yeah, I'm thinking new pads are the way to go. Not worth the risk for less than $50 for a whole set.

  6. #6
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    I've had success before burning off brake fluid on Avid pads, I'd give that a go along with a good wipe with alcohol (I prefer surgical/pure/99%) and sanding. Clean up the rotors with the same alcohol and giving them a little sanding wouldn't hurt. You will have to basically run everything back in again though, so don't get upset when they don't stop like they did right off the bat after the burn off and clean, give them some good stops and they should come back.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tall-kc View Post
    So I already read this thread, but have a new question:
    I accidentally got Tri-Flow on my brakes. Now I can't stop very well at all. I've been told I need to get new pads, as there's no way of removing the lubricant from the pads, but that I can just clean the discs. What should I clean them with, disc brake cleaner, denatured alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, soapy water?

    Also is there any hope for my pads? They aren't that old, shame to have to scrap them already.

    FYI, I ride a fully stock 2011 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR 29er comp (XXL). That means Avid Elixir-R SL brakes & 203/185 rotors.

    Thanks for any tips/help!
    Put the pads metal side down in an old fry pan...

    Set a medium heat and wait for them to stop smoking...about 5 to 10 minutes.

    Lightly sand carbon of the face of the pad...

    re install and bed in the brakes.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by lightjunction View Post
    ........ I've never tried the oven-baked method. One thing I'd be concerned about is cooking the glue that adheres the pad to the metal backing. The danger would be damaging that glue, then riding the bike without knowing it. When you'd grab a hand full of brake, the pads would break free of the glue, and you wouldn't have any brakes at all..........
    Ya, I used to think like that, but then remembered the glue on brakes is made to withstand much higher temps than you can apply with anything around a normal house. High heat is one of the major factors every time you stop and they are all designed to take anything the worst downhiller might do to them.. much higher temps than your oven
    now start talking torches and that's a diff story.

    I've nevr bothered though as the smell, destruction of a pan, and time and effort all adds up to being cheaper to just get a new pair. Now if they were brandie new pads... i'd probably give it a go,.. though out on the gas grill or something cause it's got to stink and probably smoke like crazy...

  9. #9
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    Great information guys. Thanks.

    I still think I'll just splurge for a new set of pads. Not too keen on frying my current pads. That's a good bail-out plan though if I got grease on my pads while out on a camping trip or something... s'mores, instant oatmeal, and fried brake pads! YUM

  10. #10
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    I've got a gas stove and just hold the pads by the tabs using a pliers and hold above the flame until smoking stops, no frying pan needed. Done it a few times when a bleed went a bit bad when not removing pads trying to be in a rush.
    Quote Originally Posted by tall-kc View Post
    Great information guys. Thanks.

    I still think I'll just splurge for a new set of pads. Not too keen on frying my current pads. That's a good bail-out plan though if I got grease on my pads while out on a camping trip or something... s'mores, instant oatmeal, and fried brake pads! YUM
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  11. #11
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    I also have done the pad burning method with success, I just put them on a cookie sheet in the oven at 500 deg for 10-15 mins and they worked better than when new. Nothing stayed on the cookie sheet so I kept using it as well. You could put down some foil if you are worried about it though.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nubcake View Post
    I also have done the pad burning method with success, I just put them on a cookie sheet in the oven at 500 deg for 10-15 mins and they worked better than when new. Nothing stayed on the cookie sheet so I kept using it as well. You could put down some foil if you are worried about it though.
    Hahahahha, that's funny! Did you use a non-stick or airbake sheet?

  13. #13
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    the material that the pad is made of, sintered metal is porous and no sanding or baking will remove the oil. get new pads.

  14. #14
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    ... and if we just ...

    I had the banjo connector on the end of a BH90 cable on my xtr brakes leak fluid on my pads about a month ago. I replaced the hose and bled the brakes, washed everything (calipers and rotors) in soap and water with an isopropyl Alcohol rinse, and used a burns-o-matic torch on the pads. Held them with a pair of pliers and heated them slowly until they started smoking. Kept heating them until the smoking stopped and the edges and corners of the pads were burned a little. I put everything back together and the brakes were fantastic. They now have about 50 miles of trails on them with no Ill impact. I have been carrying a set of pads in my camelbak just in case and probably will continue for a few hundred miles until I'm confident that I didn't damage them. Took about 5 minutes to burn the crap off both front pads. Worth the time to save a pretty new set of pads.
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