Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    10

    Looking to upgrade to disc brakes

    Hey guys I have been looking around on here for a while and it seems theres some really good info. I'm looking to upgrade my brakes to disc brakes. My bike is a 2003 stumpjumper hardtail. It has a rock shox dart 3 front fork. I was just wondering what a good brake set up would be for someone that is just getting into biking. I was also wondering how hard it would be to do the install myself or if I would possibly be getting in over my head by trying to do the install?

    Thanks Guys!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    346
    If you're just getting into biking, it might be worthwhile waiting a bit to see if you really do want disc brakes. V-brakes can be quite good and they're a cinch to maintain. If you ride in conditions where the v-brakes don't work well then maybe you would benefit from disc brakes.

    Mechanical disc brakes are easy to install and maintain, though having to regularly adjust the brake pads for optimum clearance is annoying. Hydraulics, Shimano at least, are easy to setup if you know what you're doing, but less so than mechanicals.

  3. #3
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    You could get a set of Avid BB7 with 160mm rotor for less then $100 and see for yourself if you really need disc brakes, i.e. if the added maintenance/adjustments are worth the price and performance for what you do. Then you can always go back to your v-brakes and sell back the BB7 part out and get back in your money fast.

    Then if you really like it, stay with the BB7 and if you ever like it so much, you could get a pair of hydro, but you'll need a good reason to switch to hydros over the BB7...

    Quick fact : Avid BB7 are mechanical disc brakes using ball bearings to allow a smooth movement of the actuation arm on the caliper, which make the whole thing very nice. They also have a pad adjuster on each side, which almost no other mech have and is very handy to fine tune the brake. They have as much stopping power as hydro and less hassle for about 25% the price of hydro with same performance. You will only need longer housing and cable, you can keep your actual levers. Be sure to have disc ready hubs also.

    David
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    98
    Don't forget that you'll probably need to buy a set of wheels if yours don't already have disc hubs. Generally, bikes with rim brakes don't have disc hubs

    -Eric

  5. #5
    007
    007 is offline
    b a n n e d
    Reputation: 007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,394
    Some good advice in here so far . . .

    I'm a big proponent of disc brakes, but only if you do really need em'.

    Where do you ride and what type of terrain is it? Up? Down? Flat? Rocks? Water? Mud?

    Whacha got?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    10
    Thanks for all the great info guys! I've been trying to look into whether or not my hubs are compatible with disc brakes or not. I think that they are but i'm not 100% sure. If I posted up some pics of the hubs and stuff would anyone be able to confirm it for me? If so what all would I need pictures of?

    As far as the riding I do. I live in SW missouri and there is definitely a lot of rocks and hills around where I ride. I plan on going down to slaughterpen hollow in Bentonville at some point.

    Once again thanks a lot guys!

  7. #7
    007
    007 is offline
    b a n n e d
    Reputation: 007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,394
    post a pic of the LEFT side of the hub . . . we'll tell ya. No idea what slaughterpen is, so can't help ya there, but with hills, you would probably benefit from disc brakes.

    A lot of folks really like mechanicals, but with how cheap hydraulics are now, I'd just go there.

  8. #8
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    Quote Originally Posted by combsy View Post
    Thanks for all the great info guys! I've been trying to look into whether or not my hubs are compatible with disc brakes or not. I think that they are but i'm not 100% sure. If I posted up some pics of the hubs and stuff would anyone be able to confirm it for me? If so what all would I need pictures of?

    As far as the riding I do. I live in SW missouri and there is definitely a lot of rocks and hills around where I ride. I plan on going down to slaughterpen hollow in Bentonville at some point.

    Once again thanks a lot guys!
    If your hubs have 6 holes on the left side (non drive side) like this hub :



    Then you have a standard 6 bolts hub.

    If your hub is like that on the left side :



    Then you have a center lock disc hub.

    If your hub is like this one on the left side :



    Then you have a standard non-disc hub and you will need another hub to run a disc brake setup.

    David
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    10
    Ok thanks! I wanna say its the center lock kind. I'll try to run out to my car and check here in a few I'm working right now.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    10
    I just went outside and looke and they are shimano deore lx hubs. To me it doesn't look like they are disc compatible. Can anyone confirm this?

  11. #11
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,011
    one more post and then you can post your pic, which would be nice so we can confirm it. LX hubs come in both disc and non-disc.

    Good job David C.

  12. #12
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    Quote Originally Posted by combsy View Post
    I just went outside and looke and they are shimano deore lx hubs. To me it doesn't look like they are disc compatible. Can anyone confirm this?
    Almost any model of hubs exist in a disc version... so I cannot answer anything here.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    10
    ok I'll try to get a picture tonight after I get off work and hopefully I can have it up tomorrow. Am I just looking at the rear hub?

  14. #14
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    Quote Originally Posted by combsy View Post
    ok I'll try to get a picture tonight after I get off work and hopefully I can have it up tomorrow. Am I just looking at the rear hub?
    Normally both hubs should have disc or no disc at all, but be sure to check both. And also make sure your fork and frame have disc tab on it to mount the calipers...

    There's 2 type of caliper mounts :

    The IS 51mm mount, which is two holes drilled to received 5mm metric bolts, separated at 51mm of distance, IS for International Standard, 51mm for the spacing of the tabs. Those are more common on the older forks (2-3 years and older) and to the rear brake, on the bike frame.



    The 72mm post mount is more common on newer forks and some newer frames. They are two post with taped inside to receive the caliper mounting bolts directly without having to use an adaptor, unless you use a disc size other then 160mm. The two post are spaced at 72mm.




    Here you can see the difference between both type of mount :

    IS 51mm :

    Post Mount 72mm :

    Brake calipers are all made for post mount 72mm, but usually comes with a adaptor for IS 51mm, and for the correct disc size.

    This is a example of direct post mount of the caliper by using a 160mm disc size :



    This is an example of a IS 51mm adaptor used to mount a caliper to a IS 51mm tabs using a 160mm disc size.



    Etc...

    David
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  15. #15
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    For the rotor, you have 2 types :

    The IS 6 bolt rotor (aka International Standard, standard, 6 bolts), which have 6 symmetrical holes to receive 6 bolts to hold the rotor to the hub. Those rotor must be used with a 6 bolt disc hub. However, center lock hubs can be also receive those rotor by using a special adaptor.

    IS 6 bolt rotor :

    The Center Lock rotor is a Shimano Patent and is mostly made to fit Shimano calipers only, by having a smaller braking surface. However, many 6 bolts rotor are also manufactured with the Center Lock design, but under the license of the Shimano Center Lock patent. They are hold in place by a lock ring, and provide a very stable and strong attachment, and also allow fast removal of the rotor. They must be used with Center Lock hubs only, no adaptor is sold to convert a 6 bolt hub to a Center Lock (as far as I know). They also require a 2 part design, one where the rotor have the Center Lock mount, called the carrier, and the second one where the brake pads contact the rotor, called the brake zone. This design is most of the time heavier then the 6 bolt pattern, since it must use a 2 part rotor, but it provide increased strength a a better resistance to warping and wrapping due to over-heat and bad caliper position.

    Center Lock rotor :

    The Center Lock rotors can be found with many types of constructions, using steel for the braking zone and aluminum carrier, titanium carrier, aluminum core sandwich between steel for the braking zone (IceTechİ from Shimano), alloy carrier, etc.. Cheap ones are hold together with rivets, allowing play to develop over time, while better ones use bolts, even titanium bolts, to allow easy maintenance and replacement of defectives parts.

    Both types of rotor can be found in any of those diameter in mm : 140, 160, 180, 185, 203, 210.

    160mm, 180mm, 185mm and 203mm are the most common, but 140mm and 210mm are sometimes used for extreme heat dissipation (210mm) or super light weight (140mm). Be sure to check the max clearance of your frame before buying rotors, since some frames are not design to accept any size of rotors. Same for the forks.

    A good way to reduce the weight and get better feeling is to use a bigger rotor front and smaller in the back, like a 185/160 combo. It's more of a personal preference, since a 140mm rotor can still trow you over the bars, but will be more susceptible to over heat faster then a 203mm.

    David
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-03-2011, 05:07 AM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-20-2010, 02:29 PM
  3. Can I upgrade to disc brakes from rim brakes?
    By Runfox in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-27-2009, 01:03 PM
  4. Can I upgrade to disc brakes?
    By Joe Spicoli in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-09-2005, 12:09 PM
  5. Singulator vs. ENO disc to upgrade to disc brakes
    By TwistedCrank in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-27-2004, 08:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •