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  1. #1
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    Loctite on caliper mounting bots?

    The caliper mounting bolts from Shimano come with a little dab of what appears to be blue Loctite. If I've run the bolts in and out a couple of times should I re-dab with fresh Loctite or is that overkill?

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Loctite on caliper mounting bots?

    Quote Originally Posted by head View Post
    The caliper mounting bolts from Shimano come with a little dab of what appears to be blue Loctite. If I've run the bolts in and out a couple of times should I re-dab with fresh Loctite or is that overkill?
    Will not hurt anything if you do.
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  3. #3
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    Use locative 222 anything else is over kill.

  4. #4
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    What about red?

  5. #5
    ronbo613
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drummerboy1975 View Post
    What about red?
    You have to heat red Loctite to remove the bolt. Use a dab of the blue(I use 242).

  6. #6
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    Red is 222, low force required to remove. Blue locative needs a high force to unscrew which is overkill as you only need locative to guard against the vibrations working it loose.

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    Loctite on caliper mounting bots?

    Quote Originally Posted by ruscle View Post
    Red is 222, low force required to remove. Blue locative(sic) needs a high force to unscrew which is overkill as you only need locative(sic) to guard against the vibrations working it loose.
    As per the LOCTITE web site 222 is purple, low strength and an industrial product : "Recommended for low strength threadlocking of adjustment screws, countersunk head screws and set screws; on collars, pulleys, tool holders and controllers. Also for low strength metals such as aluminum or brass."
    Not the applications we are discussing. Not commonly available over the counter.

    242 blue is the medium strength consumer threadlocker: "Designed for the locking and sealing of threaded fasteners which require normal disassembly with standard hand tools."
    This in the common threadlocker for most applications on a bicycle for the home mechanic.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    As per the LOCTITE web site 222 is purple, low strength and an industrial product : "Recommended for low strength threadlocking of adjustment screws, countersunk head screws and set screws; on collars, pulleys, tool holders and controllers. Also for low strength metals such as aluminum or brass."
    Not the applications we are discussing. Not commonly available over the counter.


    242 blue is the medium strength consumer threadlocker: "Designed for the locking and sealing of threaded fasteners which require normal disassembly with standard hand tools.
    Well I maybe colour blind then, but 222 is what I have always used and never had a loose bolt EVER. I tried blue locative once but found the bonding strength complete overkill especially with some of the smaller headed Allen bolts you get these days. I consider myself an expert level home mechanic, not some no idea wannabe.

  9. #9
    ronbo613
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruscle View Post
    Red is 222, low force required to remove. Blue locative needs a high force to unscrew which is overkill as you only need locative to guard against the vibrations working it loose.
    That's half correct. Brakes work by friction, they get hot. The heating/cooling cycle can also cause bolts to loosen. Maybe, a big company like Shimano had done some testing to determine which product works best, if they use blue loctite on all of their disc brakes, there must be a reason.

  10. #10
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    blue it is for the vast majority, red is used for items one prefers not to come loose or disassemble.

  11. #11
    ronbo613
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    blue it is for the vast majority, red is used for items one prefers not to come loose or disassemble.
    Like when you loosen the bolts to adjust the brakes?

  12. #12
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    That blue stuff is a different sort of loctite. Its more like a friction adder compound. It adds friction going all the way in, and all the way out, never really locking in place. Loctite dries hard and "cracks" I guess you could say, after that its free and needs to be added again. That blue crusty stuff that comes on caliper bolts is reuseable as long as its still physically on the threads.

    Purple 222 seems very appropriate for bikes. I dont use anything at all and nothing comes loose, to lean towards the safe side 222 would be good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronbo613 View Post
    Like when you loosen the bolts to adjust the brakes?
    maybe some blue on the ROTOR bolts and nothing on the caliper bolts. I actually use a touch of anti sieze on the caliper bolts so when turning the bolt it doesnt move the caliper when aligning it

  14. #14
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    Loctite on caliper mounting bots?

    Quote Originally Posted by natrat View Post
    maybe some blue on the ROTOR bolts and nothing on the caliper bolts. I actually use a touch of anti sieze on the caliper bolts so when turning the bolt it doesnt move the caliper when aligning it
    Whatever you use on the threads will not affect the caliper position.
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  15. #15
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    I got tired of the crunchy dry crap Loctite leaves behind that is hard to clean out... I went to teflon tape on everything.. works as well and in some places better than loctite, locks the bolt basically but it still removes when needed easy, and cleans out WAY easier... don't even have a bottle of loctite in the tool box anymore...
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Whatever you use on the threads will not affect the caliper position.
    yea, i wasnt clear, on my martas the top of the bolt will move the caliper slightly as is it is tightened down ,so a tiny bit of grease prevents that

  17. #17
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    I use Loctite blue and have for many years. I've never had an issue so haven't tried anything else. If and when I remove a bolt I've added it to, the hardened amount left usually comes right out leaving the bolt clean.

  18. #18
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    I use a dab of grease on my caliper bolts. Then torque it to the proper spec. Never had a bolt come loose.

    Key is proper torque specs.

  19. #19
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    So much dis-information...

    Blue is always Medium, no matter what. It's not a friction compound either, someone just made that up. Ignorance is entertaining.

    Teflon is a lubricant, so enjoy the over torque and early release. If you lube it together, you lube it apart. Might work on NPT parts, but not on bolts. Another bad idea.

    Grease will reduce the friction on the threads, so your clamp load is likely much higher than intended, if you used the specified torque. You'll understand when you break or strip a fine thread.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    So much dis-information...
    ........ Ignorance is entertaining.

    Teflon is a lubricant, so enjoy the over torque and early release. If you lube it together, you lube it apart. Might work on NPT parts, but not on bolts. Another bad idea.

    Grease will reduce the friction on the threads, so your clamp load is likely much higher than intended, if you used the specified torque. You'll understand when you break or strip a fine thread.
    oh yes... ignorant people like you are very Entertaining!!

    "Teflon tape" is not a lubricant, neither is "Teflon" Teflon isn't even a single product but a brand name owned by Dupont. It's actually many diff materials (usually a poly resin based type plastic) all under the one name depending on it's application. the Teflon branding is only a basis for "non stick" materials. There are Teflon lubricants and they are not the same material that is on Teflon pans or what Teflon tape is made of...

    you might want to actually know what you are talking about before you go calling everyone else ignorant!!

    "Teflon Tape" isn't even Teflon today as I don't think Dupont even makes it anymore..? but it stuck just like Band Aide and Clipless did. Teflon Tape is really a thread sealer.. It fills and evens out the space between the male and female threads. It also distributes a better surface tension across the high tension faces of the thread... holding it in place, Better than Loctite.....

    Grease works too, it's SUPPOSED to lube the threading to get a more even tension/torque. reason just about even manufacturer recommends it for 90% of all threaded parts on a bike, but washes away.. and doesn't even out the tension across the threads faces
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  21. #21
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    First guy ever to think Teflon, or rather, PTFE isn't a lubricant.

    Like I said, entertainment...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    First guy ever to think Teflon, or rather, PTFE isn't a lubricant.

    Like I said, entertainment...
    low friction and "lubricant" are 2 totally different things.... once again your ignorance show through...


    ya.. I guess all the Plumbers on my job site had better stop using it in high pressure lines as it's gunna come Unscrewed... ..

    just a fact for ya... had a suspension pivot bolt come undone on a regular basis,.. factory Loctite was replaced twice.... finally just did it myself with tape... hasn't moved in over 2 yrs.... hmmmmm but oh wait.. it'll come undone cause it's "lubricated"
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  23. #23
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    just a fact for ya... had a suspension pivot bolt come undone on a regular basis,.. factory Loctite was replaced twice.... finally just did it myself with tape... hasn't moved in over 2 yrs.... hmmmmm but oh wait.. it'll come undone cause it's "lubricated" [/QUOTE]

    Thanks for that one; I was just headed down to the stand to deal with a main pivot bolt that likes to walk out all on its own, but thought I'd have a sandwich and check the site. 'Tef' tape sounds like just the thing. 242 wasn't holding.

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