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  1. #1
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    Just got BB7's and need help

    Yes, I have trolled the forums and read a lot of good tips but for some reason I cannot get my bb7s to work properly. I loosen the caliper bolt so it can move freely, untighten the wire tension bolt. I then try and dial the pads by using the red knobs. I think I am confusing myself though, which knobs are which? Is the smaller one the outer adjustment knob and is the larger one (closer to the wheel) the inner adjustment knob? I just can’t seem to get them centered and its annoying me.
    This is my first time having a decent pair of breaks so I am new to it. I have the speed dial levers as well. thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
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    The knobs move the pads on the same side the knob is on. Run the wheel side knob in 3-4 clicks, then run the outside knob in until the pad is tight on the rotor. Tighten up the CPS bolts, slowly so they don't twist the caliper. Don't get carried away, they don't have to be super tight. Use a torque wrench if you have one. Now back the inside knob up two clicks, and back the outside one up until the pad doesn't rub. That'll at least get you in the ball park.

    You don't need to mess with the cable attachment at all once you've got it tight unless the cable stretches. Just run the cable, pull it tight while making sure the caliper arm is relaxed (not moving the pads), and cinch it down.
    The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity - W.B. Yeats

  3. #3
    rebmem rbtm
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    Have you read the Installation and Setup Guide ?

    http://cdn.sram.com/sites/default/files/techdocs/2006_BB5and7_English.pdf

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob View Post
    The knobs move the pads on the same side the knob is on. Run the wheel side knob in 3-4 clicks, then run the outside knob in until the pad is tight on the rotor. Tighten up the CPS bolts, slowly so they don't twist the caliper. Don't get carried away, they don't have to be super tight. Use a torque wrench if you have one. Now back the inside knob up two clicks, and back the outside one up until the pad doesn't rub. That'll at least get you in the ball park.

    You don't need to mess with the cable attachment at all once you've got it tight unless the cable stretches. Just run the cable, pull it tight while making sure the caliper arm is relaxed (not moving the pads), and cinch it down.
    I know the knobs move the pads on the same side as the knob is on. But in the manuals its saying the outer adjustment knob and inner, not sure which one is which. The big one is hard as heck to move. hurts my thumb doing it.

    So what i should do is turn the knobs until the pads are completely away from the rotor, then turn the wheel side knob 3-4 clicks and then turn the smaller one until the pad is tight on the rotor? tighten slowly the cps bolts. I seem to have done this before but then when i back out the knobs it seems to still rub. so i backed it out until they dont rub anymore but then there is no breaking power in the lever.

    sorry i am dumb

  5. #5
    human dehumidifier
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    Inside = toward the inside of the bike, Outside = toward the outside of the bike. So the inside knob is the one on the wheel side.

    You can use a torx driver in the center of the inside knob so you don't kill your fingers.

    Maybe what you're doing is turning both knobs to stop the rub when you should only be turning one? If you get the right angle to look you'll be able to see the rotor and pad and you should be able to see an air gap. It helps if you are over a light colored background like a concrete floor.

    There are probably videos on youtube giving instructions so maybe that would help to clear it up.
    The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity - W.B. Yeats

  6. #6
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    This is an extract of the best guide I found on the net for BB7 setup. Never failed me .It look long and complicated (it's not really when you get the hang of it. But trust me, your brakes will perform.


    Inner pad ajuster == Big red knob. Hard to turn, use the hex key (Adjust once in a blue moon or never)
    Outer pad adjuster == Little red knob, easy to turn can use hand (adjust for pad wear )

    1. Start with clean or new pads. Clean the rotors with alcohol and never touch with skin.
    2. Rotors must be true to within .005" on a dial caliper or damn close to it.
    3. You must have avid speed dial levers for this to work. Shimanos with inner adjusters are close but will never do the job as well.
    4. Use locktite on all older caliper and rotor mount bolts, preferably blue 242. This product is in your tool kit right? Any self respecting bike mechanic has this stuff laying around…right next to your torque wrench, and lube.
    5. Loosen caliper adapter bolts slightly and rotate up in the direction of rotors rotation and tighten. You have your torque wrench and know how to use it right?
    6. Loosen caliper mount bolts slightly so caliper can move side to side.
    7. Back out red pad adjusters fully.
    8. Turn inner pad adjuster in fully then back out 10 indexed clicks. If your brakes are all crapped up and you can not feel the clicks, you need to first clean everything with soap and water and start over.
    9. Turn outer pad adjuster in till it bottoms out on rotor. Do not force this step. Rotor should not move in caliper at this time but caliper may move slightly on its adapter.
    10. Tighten caliper mount bolts. You are using a torque wrench right? You know the torque specs right? Look them up! How did you get this far with out them?
    11. With a cable in your lever and housing run to the caliper (all new or in good shape and at proper length I’ll assume) turn barrel adjuster in full.
    You have prepped your cable housings right? This means (at minimum) you have used a grinder, Dremel tool, file or equivalent to prep the ends of the housings so that they are perfectly flat with no burs or irregularities? If you believe that cable prep is not necessary or important, stop reading now…these instructions will not help you. This step is near and dear to me because many “professional” bike mechanics have tried to explain that this step is not needed, and they do not even have tools necessary to perform it. Why bother with disc brakes if you are not going to deal with interface issues with cable housing ends?
    12. If your caliper has some miles on it, it might be nice to dab the cable pinch bolt with some wet chain lube, grease, or anti seize.
    13. Use a 4th hand tool to take up any slack in the cable and tighten the pinch bolt. As in step 9, do not force this. If you see movement in the actuator arm, go back to step 7.
    14. Grab a handful of lever and check for cable slack. There should be none. If this is a new cable/housing install, give it 4 pulls to seat everything into operational position then go back to step 13. Do not reef on the lever, you should never have to use more than one finger on your dialed BB7s. Your cables should not stretch during the life of your brakes…BB7s do not rely on high cable tension to work properly, overly tensioning the cables (reefing on the levers) can actually damage the calipers. If you feel much sponge in the brakes, you probably did not prep the housings! Properly tuned BB7s will provide enough braking force with one finger to lock up and throw you OTB…If you don’t have this much brake force, you should definitely be reading this!
    15. Back both pad adjusters out fully.
    16. Turn inner pad adjuster in about 4 indexed clicks, pull lever 3 times, spin wheel and check for rub. Repeat this step till any rub is heard. Once rub is heard, back it out 1 click at a time till it goes away then 2 or 3 more for clearance.
    17. Repeat step 16 for the outer pad adjuster. With an ear close to the rotor, you should hear zero rub of rotor to pads.
    18. Lever throw should suit your style. Too tight? Back out the outer pad adjuster 1 click at a time till feel is reached, not the inner pad.
    19. Now that both brakes are set and working, see how 1 lever feels nice n stiff and the other feels like a fresh turd (firm but not solid)? No problems! That’s just a good short front cable vs. that long rear cable and all its housing compression. Rectify this and modulation feel 1/2 turn at a time of the speed dial knob on your levers. Start with the front knob turned in to soften up the leverage ratio of said cable to match the rears feel. A 1/2 turn goes a long way so take your time.
    20. See that little hex head on the back of the actuator arm? That’s a preload adjuster for the spring tension on the caliper. Turn it in to suit additional lever feel.
    21. I like to trim my cable to about 2" so I can service and re-tune the system several times before replacement is needed. Make damn sure it doesn’t touch or get in the rotor and don’t forget your cable end.
    22. Take up slack in pad wear by repeating these steps.
    23. Now go ride and dig your new brake feel!

    Not by me. Source : Avid BB7 Disc Brake set up and tuning. | Two Wheel Blogs

  7. #7
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    I have always used this method, the video is for road brakes, but the MT are the same.
    Make sure the barrel adjuster on your lever is screwed all the way into the lever before adjusting the brakes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NasGJFtgq0A

  8. #8
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    Having a hard time with my rear setup.

    1. The hub is loud as **** so I sometimes dont hear the scraping when adjusting.
    2. Ill think everything is tuned then during a ride Ill start hearing it go scratch/scratch/scratch.

    Going to try that lengthy method above as Ive only tried the YT and PDF guides.

  9. #9
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    I just took my bike in for a tune up and the breaks are set perfectly. I am a little concerned because they don't to seem have the stopping power as everyone describes. I know there is a break in period and I havent used them much but when I do, I feel myself wanting to throw on my no name breaks.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by polecats03 View Post
    I just took my bike in for a tune up and the breaks are set perfectly. I am a little concerned because they don't to seem have the stopping power as everyone describes. I know there is a break in period and I havent used them much but when I do, I feel myself wanting to throw on my no name breaks.
    Yes, you will need to allow them to set for a ride or two.
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  11. #11
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    If you get scrapes when you ride, it probably happens during a weight shift or cornering. Could be that your hub isn't mounted securely. Get that QR skewer sorted!

    Centering shouldn't be of any concern. You should run the inner pad as close to the rotor as possible - it doesn't move when you pull the lever.

  12. #12
    Humble servant
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    Great information. I wish I'd known about this when I set up my BB7s. Saving this to my documents.
    Idiot Out Riding Around

  13. #13
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    /\/\

    Just edit out the obnoxious "you have the paste dont you ? Why do you even have a bike if you dont have paste ?" and save some ink when printing.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    If you get scrapes when you ride, it probably happens during a weight shift or cornering. Could be that your hub isn't mounted securely. Get that QR skewer sorted!

    Centering shouldn't be of any concern. You should run the inner pad as close to the rotor as possible - it doesn't move when you pull the lever.
    It may be. I redid my brakes via the tut. Ill give them a ride see how it is. I wasnt using the dials on my levers and pulling the cable with the (other peice normally used for tension I forget the name). Im thinking its either something loose on wheel or some wonky effect of cable pull.

  15. #15
    Dont Rep me
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    Also check if the disc is warped or not. That usually is the source of intermittent scratch sound.

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