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  1. #1
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    Installing new juicy pads

    Is there a trick to this? I've been at it for 30 minutes and I can't get the damn things in there. If I get one in, the other pops out.

    grrrrr

  2. #2
    Hic-A-Doo-La!
    Reputation: Cobretti's Avatar
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    I'll try. Did you remove the metal hardware piece from the top of the caliper first?
    Then take the spring and place between the two pads.
    Then squeeze them together with pliers and slide them up in there.
    Once they've started up in there you don't need the pliers anymore.
    Push them the rest of the way with your fingers 'till they snap into place.
    Once they're in there the clip thing goes in at the top.

  3. #3
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    The clip at the top DOES NOT need to be removed.

    Make sure the pistons are pushed all the way back into the bores. Sandwich the spring between the pads, and push them in. Make sure the pads are oriented in the right direction.

    If the pistons will not go all the way back in, the system may be overfilled, just open the bleed port at the lever and push the pistons back.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    The clip at the top DOES NOT need to be removed.

    Make sure the pistons are pushed all the way back into the bores. Sandwich the spring between the pads, and push them in. Make sure the pads are oriented in the right direction.

    If the pistons will not go all the way back in, the system may be overfilled, just open the bleed port at the lever and push the pistons back.
    I'm a newbie putting my first set of pads in to my juicy 5's and having trouble getting the piston all the way back in... Is the bleed port the same as the "reservoir"?

  5. #5
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    No. The bleed port is a little torx bolt near the reservoir. DO NOT remove the reservoir cap.

    Before you let fluid out, take a tire lever, and rock it back and forth between the pistons. If the tire lever can push the piston back, but the piston creeps back out, then the system is most likely overfilled.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    No. The bleed port is a little torx bolt near the reservoir. DO NOT remove the reservoir cap.

    Before you let fluid out, take a tire lever, and rock it back and forth between the pistons. If the tire lever can push the piston back, but the piston creeps back out, then the system is most likely overfilled.
    ... and if the piston can't be pushed back? Tried to push it in with a butter knife (suggestion of the 'net) earlier to no avail.

  7. #7
    853+29+1x24=Fun
    Reputation: kev0153's Avatar
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    You may not need to take that clip out but it does make it easier sometimes.

  8. #8
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
    Reputation: Acme54321's Avatar
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    Is the "clip" you guys are referring to the spreader between the pads? If so you deffinately need to take that out.

    The easiest way to put new pads in is to make a sandwich: pad, spreader spring, pad. Then slide it all up in there at once. You can do it in a matter of seconds.

    To get them out pull out one at a time, some needlnosed to grab the tab makes it easier.

  9. #9
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acme54321
    Is the "clip" you guys are referring to the spreader between the pads? If so you deffinately need to take that out.

    The easiest way to put new pads in is to make a sandwich: pad, spreader spring, pad. Then slide it all up in there at once. You can do it in a matter of seconds.

    To get them out pull out one at a time, some needlnosed to grab the tab makes it easier.
    No, he means the metal clip in the opening at the back of the caliper. I still see no reason that needs to be removed.

  10. #10
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    No, he means the metal clip in the opening at the back of the caliper. I still see no reason that needs to be removed.
    In that case then it deffinately doesn't need to come out, in fact it probably makes installing new pads harder. I don't get what the problem is, changing pads on these things is super easy.

  11. #11
    853+29+1x24=Fun
    Reputation: kev0153's Avatar
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    I had a pair of pads that wouldn't go in right for some reason, it was probably me. I tried taking the clip out they went in, I snapped the clip back in. Don't take it out unless you get some stubborn pads. That's all.

  12. #12
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
    Reputation: Acme54321's Avatar
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    Oh it also helps with taking the pads out if you have a worn out set it do pry the pads apart with a screwdriver or whatever first. This will partially push the pistons back in so its easier for the pads to come off. Don't do it if you want to reuse the pads though as it may damage them.

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