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  1. #1
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    Increasing lever throw?

    I have tried the search function but haven't found quite the answer I am looking for. I have a set of Elixir 5s. I cut and bled the front line the other day and now I have too little lever throw.

    Is there a quick/simple fix to this or do I need to do a rebleed and do something different than the other bleed? All I can think of is something along the line of not putting hardly any pressure on the syringe plunger when finishing the bleed at the lever. Maybe I forced too much fluid in there? I thought I put "gentle" pressure, but of course that terminology is a little vague.

    Can I remove the screw at the bleed port, gently apply pressure on the lever, and force a little excess fluid out? I don't think that will work or I would have tried it already. Anyway, thanks for the help.
    Our Stable: Yeti ASR-5, Yeti Big Top , Yeti ARC-X, Orbea Diva, Co-Motion Speedster one for me, one for her

  2. #2
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    Did you pish the pads/pistons right back flush with the caliper when you bled?
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  3. #3
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    I did not do anything at the caliper other than leaving the bleed block in place. I assumed it held the pistons in the correct position. Should I do another bleed and press the pistons farther in?
    Our Stable: Yeti ASR-5, Yeti Big Top , Yeti ARC-X, Orbea Diva, Co-Motion Speedster one for me, one for her

  4. #4
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    If the pistons were extended when you bled (ie. filled the system), then you will now have too much fluid in there. Although this usually only presents itself as an issue under repeated hard braking (because the fluid has nowhere to expand to), it can, under the right circumstances, leave you with the problem you've described. Given that the brake was fine prior to your work, it's a fair bet that it's something you've done that has caused your problem.

    Without being able to get hands on the brake, the best advice I can give is to open the bleed port on the lever and tape a little tissue to it, then push the pads as far back as they can go, so that the backing plates are flush with the caliper. This should leave you with the ideal amount of fluid in the system. You'll then need to align the pistons/pads to the disc. Don't bother with Avid's CPS technique - check out the Hope videos (link) for proper installation guides.
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

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