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  1. #1
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    I want more braking power on my 29'er

    I have GF Rig 29'r with Avid 887 MTN cable brakes with 160mm rotors (I don't know what that means, but I just read the numbers on it). I want to go with 180mm+ both front and rear, and hydraulic. Any concerns/thoughts with this thinking?

  2. #2
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter McGavin MTB
    I have GF Rig 29'r with Avid 887 MTN cable brakes with 160mm rotors (I don't know what that means, but I just read the numbers on it). I want to go with 180mm+ both front and rear, and hydraulic. Any concerns/thoughts with this thinking?
    887 brakes? Do you mean BB7? If you don't know what 160mm rotor means how do you know you want 180s?

    You could get a lot more power simply by going with a larger rotor in the front. All you would need is a new rotor and caliper adapter.

    But there is nothing wrong with getting hydros front and rear if that is what you are itching for, and as long as you are getting new brakes you may as well get whatever size rotor you want. I have always run a 160 on the rear, even with a larger rotor in the front. No reason you can't run the 180s at both ends, though.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  3. #3
    ride hard take risks
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    Agree with kapusta keep the rear a 160 bump the front to a 180 and semi metallic pads.
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  4. #4
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    +2 on the larger rotor and adapter.

  5. #5
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    I just replaced my 185/160 to a 180/160, new pads (sintered) and new brake lines on my BB7s. I noticed the most stopping power from replacing my brake lines. I went from some generics to Jagwire Ripcords and I can skid the rear now which I could never do before. I know the pads did help but it really came to notice with the new lines (full run no breaks).

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  6. #6
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57
    I just replaced my 185/160 to a 180/160, new pads (sintered) and new brake lines on my BB7s. I noticed the most stopping power from replacing my brake lines. I went from some generics to Jagwire Ripcords and I can skid the rear now which I could never do before. I know the pads did help but it really came to notice with the new lines (full run no breaks).
    Yes, the cables/housing make a huge difference, and Jagwire Ripcords are my go-to cable set

    They are still not like hydros, but I think that before people decide that hydros are worth the extra money, they really need to try a set of bb7s with full length Ripcord cable/housing.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  7. #7
    ballbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter McGavin MTB
    I have GF Rig 29'r with Avid 887 MTN cable brakes with 160mm rotors (I don't know what that means, but I just read the numbers on it). I want to go with 180mm+ both front and rear, and hydraulic. Any concerns/thoughts with this thinking?
    If you have Speed Dial levers, you can also adjust the leverage ratio.

    Second sintered (semi-metallic) pads. They tend to have more bite and last longer. Downside is they tend to make more noise. YMMV

    If you glazed your brakes, you can also try to re-bed them. Sand the pads down a tad, score up the rotor braking surface, clean everything with brake kleen, and burn them back in.

  8. #8
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    Hmmm, I just couldn't read it, but yea is BB7, that's why I didn't know what that meant because I didn't see it referenced anywhere. So I guess I could just put the 180 on the front with an adapter and try those cables, that sounds like a good option. Why do stay with smaller rotor on the rear?

  9. #9
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    You need 10% bigger to allow for the bigger wheels so a 160mm on a 29er is ridiculous and the same as a 144 on a 26" wheel, so just go 203mm back and front, you'll never notice the weight difference. ( 180mm rear if you really have to )

  10. #10
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter McGavin MTB
    Why do stay with smaller rotor on the rear?
    Because the vast majority of your braking is from the front.

    Some people like to keep them the same size, nothing wrong with that.

    Personally, I find that they feel more balanced with the smaller one in the rear because when they are the same size I need to squeeze a lot harder on the front. It just feels like it is more in line with the amount of power I want delivered to the rear vs the front.

    If you do a search, you will see this point endlessly argued (whether there is any reason to not have the biggest rotor possible on both ends)
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  11. #11
    ride hard take risks
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    What kapusta said again no need to be skidding the rear tire from to much brake. I had a issue years back where my 180 rear rotor would warp on the same hill so I decided to go to a smaller 160 rotor and never had the warping issue again. Is their a explanation why going smaller wouldnt warp? my rotor never said but it works.
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  12. #12
    Rub it............
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    One thing to add is when upgrading the size of the rotor, check the forks specifications to see what the max size rotor that they recommend. Too big can cause damage to a fork.

  13. #13
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    Add a tire with some bite as well. All the power in the world can't bring a semi slick to a grinding halt.

    1. Good tire
    2. Hydros
    3. 180F, 160R
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