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  1. #1
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    I hate the new XT 2012 brakes

    This is how much:

    !@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$@@X$@@!#@#$!@#$@!# $!!@#$@!#$@#$@!#$!@##!@@#!$!@#$@#!$@#$@#!$$@#!!@!! !!!!!!!!

    For the last four hours, I've been trying to install the front brake so that the pads don't rub against the rotor. I've loosened the mounting bolts at least 50 times, and following the instructions I depress the brake lever and then tighten the mounting bolts. But the rotor always rubs.

    I've tried tightening the clamping bolts after pushing the brake cable forward, backward, and to the side. I've also tried it with the brake housing clamped to the Fox cable guide on the left fork leg and unclamped. I've tried tightening the bolts with the handlebars turned to either side as well as pointing straight ahead. Nothing works!

    There are 3 washers, 2 sides to the adapters in addition to the post mounts, and as far as I can tell there is no may the tolerances of all those surfaces is going to allow you to line up a rotor that has at most 1mm of clearance to the brake pads on each side of the rotor. Depressing the brake lever while tightening the mounting bolts does absolutely nothing to prevent the brakes from rubbing against the rotor.

    My brakes came completely assembled, but I resorted to removing the brake pads in order to try pushing the pistons in. They didn't budge--but it's not like I could can get any leverage on them. They are white(is that the piston?) and both stick out about 1mm.

    Oh yeah, I had to buy a Torx wrench to install the RT75 rotors. What idiots would ever use torx bolts for any application? The person who invented the torx wrench?? And the instructions for the rotors say I am supposed to bend the tightening plate over the bolts? Impossible!

    I will never buy another Shimano product again. I've never seen a system so badly designed. How is it possible that there isn't an adjustment screw for each brake pad?

    !#@$!@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$!@#$!#@$!@#$!@#$ you Shimano!

    not happy, not riding
    Last edited by happyriding; 09-30-2011 at 03:34 PM.

  2. #2
    Big Test Icycles
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    Have you looked at the rotor. Could it be warped. Is it new. Just a thought.


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  3. #3
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    Brand new rotor, never used. Spins straight and true, not warped.

  4. #4
    Weird huh?
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    Another possibility: Pull off the front wheel and put it back on paying careful attention to making sure it's precisely centered. If even slightly off by a half a millimeter in one of the dropouts on your fork, it'll rub.

    Good luck!
    Poaching Demo...that's why we can't have nice things...

  5. #5
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    Thanks. I thought of that too. When I removed the brake pads, I had to remove the front wheel, so I thought remounting the front wheel might help. I have a 20mm through axle fork, and the tolerances of the through axle are pretty tight--in fact it is a pain to get it to slide through the second fork leg.

  6. #6
    Moosehead
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    Have you ridden the bike and/or bedded in the pads? This usually does it, especially for the XT's which are typically easier setup than most hydraulics.

    Other possibility is too much fluid in the system, a bit less may cure the problem but would try bedding them in first.

    Toss out the lock tabs that are to be bent over the torx bolts, most wrenches do the same.

  7. #7
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    Find a business card. Cut it in half. With the caliper bolts loose, slide each half between each pad and the rotor. Depress brake lever while tightening caliper bolts.
    NOAH SEARS
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    For the last four hours, I've been trying to install the front brake so that the pads don't rub against the rotor. I've loosened the mounting bolts at least 50 times, and following the instructions I depress the brake lever and then tighten the mounting bolts. But the rotor always rubs.
    Holding the brake lever on and then tightening the bolts doesn't really work that well for aligning disc brakes. It's better to align the pads by eye. Assuming that your brake rotor is completely true (difficult to tell just by looking at them) then the easiest way to align brake pads is usually outdoors in direct sunlight. The sunlight shows up the small gap between the pads and rotor more clearly than doing it indoors.

    For the front brake if you turn the bike upside down so that it is resting on the saddle and handlebars then you can look down through the caliper and see the clearance between rotor and pad. Don't pull the brake lever whilst the bike is upside down. Part tightening the caliper bolts and then gently pushing the caliper sideways small amounts allows you to fine tune the alignment of the caliper with the brake rotor. By having the bolts part tightened it allows you to make fine adjustments to the caliper alignment.

    If the rotor is warped then you can true it by carefully bending it straight.

    Disk Brake Rotor Precision Truing

    If it's a new bike build then you might need the suspension fork's post mounts faced also so that they're flat.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Oh yeah, I had to buy a Torx wrench to install the RT75 rotors. What idiots would ever use torx bolts for any application? The person who invented the torx wrench??
    Sorry, but that's standard for all 6-bolt disc brakes. Torx bolts are starting to pop in lots of other places now too (chainring bolts, stems, etc). Every multi-tool in recent years has had a Torx T25 wrench. "Those people" were smart because torx heads do a much better job of resisting stripping out compared to whatever size hex head you could fit on the size bolt head.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    Holding the brake lever on and then tightening the bolts doesn't really work that well for aligning disc brakes. It's better to align the pads by eye.
    +1

    I was frustrated and unable to centre my SLX calipers using Shimano's "squeeze the lever" technique. Doing it by eye worked great. The clearance on each pad is extremely tight.

    Also, the pistons in my calipers stick out a tiny bit when they are all the way in. I don't think this is a problem

  11. #11
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    are your fork/frame tabs clean, and faced?

  12. #12
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    Is one pad rubbing or are both pads rubbing? Aligning a caliper is a delicate deal. Never use the "squeeze the lever" method, doesn't work. You should align it visually and tighten it as you watch. It is common for the caliper to "walk" out of postion if you crank the bolt really hard or too fast. Tighten the bolts slowly, very slowly. In some cases, you may even need to put some force against the caliper with one hand as you tighten the bolts to keeping it from "walking".

    If both pads are rubbing, try riding it around the block a few times. If that doesn't fix it, there may be too much fluid in the system.

    Have you considered taking it to your LBS???

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by moosehead View Post
    Have you ridden the bike and/or bedded in the pads? This usually does it,
    Maybe it's just the brakes that I've used, but whenever I change the pads I get some rub until I bed them in- especially with brand new rotors. The squeezing the brake lever method of centering the caliper has also always worked for me. They are supposed to be "self-centering." Maybe I've just been lucky with that, though.
    The new XTs are supposed to be pretty hassle free. If it's really that much of a PITA to line them up, I wouldn't be surprised if something was defective. But just try bedding them in properly first (if you haven't already) before you go any more ape-****.
    Also, I understand the frustration and the need to rant, but I've never seen anything other than torx bolts on rotors.

    Best of luck.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    My brakes came completely assembled, but I resorted to removing the brake pads in order to try pushing the pistons in. They didn't budge--but it's not like I could can get any leverage on them. They are white(is that the piston?) and both stick out about 1mm.
    This is likely your problem, the pistons are sticking out too far. Rotate the lever assembly so the master cylinder is horizontal and then loosen the bleed screw slightly. Now press the pistons in by inserting the plastic separators that came in the front & rear calipers and wedging a screwdriver between them. You should be able to get the pistons flush with the caliper surface. Don't forget to tighten the bleed screw before moving the lever. I just went through this with new M666 SLX brakes.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for all the responses.

    I ended up adjusting the pads by feel. With the brake mounting bolts loose, I pulled the brake body away from the wheel so that the inside pad hit the rotor. Then I moved the brake body outwards in small increments, tightened the caliper bolts, and spun the wheel to listen for rubbing.

    The Park Tool website also has a couple of suggestions:

    Park Tool Co. » ParkTool Blog » Shimano® Hydraulic Brake Service and Adjustment

    The one that helped me finally get the front brake aligned was to only undo one of the mounting bolts and then pushing on that end of the brake body to move the pad slightly.

    Depressing the brake lever does squat. !@#$@!##@! Shimano for the shite instructions. Thanks mtbr for the real instructions!

    As for facing, my LBS said not to bother with the post mounts on the fork because they said the adjustment was going to be side to side. But they did face the rear brake mounts. The facing on the rear didn't make any difference: squeezing the brake lever, then tightening the bolts led to rubbing. I tried five times, and the brakes rubbed each time. Once again, I removed the brake pads and checked the pistons and they each protruded about 1mm just like in the front. So I ended up adjusting the rear brake by feel too.

    The reason I decided to remove both brake pads was because when I was mounting the levers on the handle bars, I gently squeezed the brakes while checking their position, and then I noticed that the orange insert had fallen out of one of them. I thought maybe the pistons on one of the brakes might be screwed up because of that.

    I have a question, there is a long thin bolt I unscrewed to remove the pads--it had a clip on the end of it. When I unscrewed that bolt it seemed to break free as if was glued in there--but the Park Tool website doesn't mention putting any loctite on there when reinstalling. Does that bolt need loctite?

    Now I'm watching for leaking brake fluid. I've got my fingers crossed.

    Oh yeah, after aligning the rear brake, I realized I needed to route the cable on the inside of the chain stay. Rather than remove the rear brake, I'm going slide everything off the bars and use the brake lever to route the cable. I want no part of adjusting the rear brake again!
    Last edited by happyriding; 09-30-2011 at 11:11 PM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoahColorado View Post
    Find a business card. Cut it in half. With the caliper bolts loose, slide each half between each pad and the rotor. Depress brake lever while tightening caliper bolts.
    I can't see how that could possibly do anything. The whole problem is that the mounting bolts can flex the rotor. Adding business cards won't prevent that.
    Last edited by happyriding; 09-30-2011 at 11:25 PM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by moosehead View Post
    Have you ridden the bike and/or bedded in the pads? This usually does it, especially for the XT's which are typically easier setup than most hydraulics.

    Other possibility is too much fluid in the system, a bit less may cure the problem but would try bedding them in first.

    Toss out the lock tabs that are to be bent over the torx bolts, most [mechanics] do the same.
    Thanks. I couldn't get a small screwdriver under the tightening plates to bend them, and after a few seconds of trying, I gave up. I just laughed at what a miserable idea those tightening plates are, and I didn't waste any more time on it. The bolts have some blue stuff on it, which I assume is loctite.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    I have a question, there is a long thin bolt I unscrewed to remove the pads--it had a clip on the end of it. When I unscrewed that bolt it seemed to break free as if was glued in there--but the Park Tool website doesn't mention putting any loctite on there when reinstalling. Does that bolt need loctite?
    Glad you've got the alignment sorted out. Hopefully you'll come to enjoy your brakes It is surprising that Shimano continues to publish that method when it can easily not work. They should at least add a "If the pads continue to rub..."

    I've heard that the little clip doesn't matter. Plenty of people lose them without problems. Just make sure the bolt is tight (not too much, of course).

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Thanks for all the responses.

    I ended up adjusting the pads by feel. With the brake mounting bolts loose, I pulled the brake body away from the wheel so that the inside pad hit the rotor. Then I moved the brake body outwards in small increments, tightened the caliper bolts, and spun the wheel to listen for rubbing.

    The Park Tool website also has a couple of suggestions:

    Park Tool Co. » ParkTool Blog » Shimano® Hydraulic Brake Service and Adjustment

    The one that helped me finally get the front brake aligned was to only undo one of the mounting bolts and then pushing on that end of the brake body to move the pad slightly.

    Depressing the brake lever does squat. !@#$@!##@! Shimano for the shite instructions. Thanks mtbr for the real instructions!

    As for facing, my LBS said not to bother with the post mounts on the fork because they said the adjustment was going to be side to side. But they did face the rear brake mounts. The facing on the rear didn't make any difference: squeezing the brake lever, then tightening the bolts led to rubbing. I tried five times, and the brakes rubbed each time. Once again, I removed the brake pads and checked the pistons and they each protruded about 1mm just like in the front. So I ended up adjusting the rear brake by feel too.

    The reason I decided to remove both brake pads was because when I was mounting the levers on the handle bars, I gently squeezed the brakes while checking their position, and then I noticed that the orange insert had fallen out of one of them. I thought maybe the pistons on one of the brakes might be screwed up because of that.

    I have a question, there is a long thin bolt I unscrewed to remove the pads--it had a clip on the end of it. When I unscrewed that bolt it seemed to break free as if was glued in there--but the Park Tool website doesn't mention putting any loctite on there when reinstalling. Does that bolt need loctite?

    Now I'm watching for leaking brake fluid. I've got my fingers crossed.

    Oh yeah, after aligning the rear brake, I realized I needed to route the cable on the inside of the chain stay. Rather than remove the rear brake, I'm going slide everything off the bars and use the brake lever to route the cable. I want no part of adjusting the rear brake again!
    Check that bolt for tightness after every ride for a while. If it starts to loosen, use loctite, otherwise no need.

    I hate to break it to you but each time you have to remove a wheel, for a flat or to change a tire, you MAY (not for surely, though) need to do a slight caliper realignment. That's just part of the game...

  20. #20
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    After you've ridden the bike a few times, and bedded the pads in, it's often worth going back and tweaking the caliper alignment to make sure it's still running smoothly.

    For taking wheels on and off the trick is to get the skewer and wheel back into the same position that it was in when you aligned the caliper initially. When you take the wheels on and off the brakes will stay in alignment if the skewer tightness is exactly the same each time. If the skewer tightness is different between taking the wheel on and off then it changes the rotor position relative to the brake caliper very slightly, which can make the brakes rub.

    Systems like the Fox 15QR are good because the set number of turns means that you will reliably tighten the skewer back to the same tightness.

    The picture below shows the rotor / pad gap on my Shimano XTR M988 brakes. Your brakes should have a similar gap.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails I hate the new XT 2012 brakes-xtr_pad_gap.jpg  


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    Holding the brake lever on and then tightening the bolts doesn't really work that well for aligning disc brakes. It's better to align the pads by eye. Assuming that your brake rotor is completely true (difficult to tell just by looking at them) then the easiest way to align brake pads is usually outdoors in direct sunlight. The sunlight shows up the small gap between the pads and rotor more clearly than doing it indoors.

    For the front brake if you turn the bike upside down so that it is resting on the saddle and handlebars then you can look down through the caliper and see the clearance between rotor and pad. Don't pull the brake lever whilst the bike is upside down. Part tightening the caliper bolts and then gently pushing the caliper sideways small amounts allows you to fine tune the alignment of the caliper with the brake rotor. By having the bolts part tightened it allows you to make fine adjustments to the caliper alignment.

    If the rotor is warped then you can true it by carefully bending it straight.
    .
    This is what I do, it's the only thing that works properly IMO.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsilva View Post
    Glad you've got the alignment sorted out. Hopefully you'll come to enjoy your brakes It is surprising that Shimano continues to publish that method when it can easily not work. They should at least add a "If the pads continue to rub..."

    I've heard that the little clip doesn't matter. Plenty of people lose them without problems. Just make sure the bolt is tight (not too much, of course).
    I didn't loose the clip, my question was about the bolt. I removed the clip before unscrewing the bolt. It's just that it was really hard to unscrew such a small bolt, and it felt like it broke free--as if it was was loctited in there.

    For the first few rides, I will have to check every bolt on my whole bike because this is my first mtb build.

    Thanks for the "taking off the wheel" advice. After rerouting the brake cable on the inside of the chain stay, I had a heck of a time just getting my wheel back on. I have the rear derailleur and chain installed now, and trying to get the wheel around the derailleur while guiding the rotor into the brake caliper, and getting the drop outs to sit on my rear through axle proved almost impossible for me to do. It was a real struggle, and I had to abort my first attempt. When I finally got my wheel back on, I was sure I had knocked the rotor or brakes out of alignment, but I guess I got lucky.
    Last edited by happyriding; 10-01-2011 at 07:55 PM.

  23. #23
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    I've wondered why the caliper doesn't use jack screws, like on v brakes for spring adjustment, against the caliper bolt. It would sure help with adjustment and repeatability. I mentioned this years ago and got flack for it from someone. Am I missing something?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    I didn't loose the clip, my question was about the bolt. It was really hard to unscrew such a small bolt, and it felt like it broke free, like it was loctited in there.

    For the first few rides, I will have to check every bolt on my whole bike because this is my first mtb build.

    Thanks for the "taking off the wheel" advice. After rerouting the brake cable on the inside of the chain stay, I had a heck of a time just getting my wheel back on. I have the rear derailleur and chain installed now, and trying to get the wheel around the derailleur while guiding the rotor into the brake caliper, and getting the drop outs to sit on my rear through axle proved almost impossible for me to do. It was a real struggle, and I had to abort my first attempt. When I finally got my wheel back on, I was sure I had knocked the rotor or brakes out of alignment, but I guess I got lucky.
    The bolt holding the brake pads in place should be tight. The clip is an additional safety measure. You really don't want that bolt holding the brake pads to fall out as then you'd lose the brake pads also.

    Getting the back wheel into the frame with a disc brake takes a bit of practice initially. Whenever you take the wheel off make sure that the chain is in a lowish gear before you start - I'll usually use middle chainring and 1 up from the smallest rear sprocket (33T chainring x 12T sprocket). The more tension that there is on the chain the harder it is to get the wheel back into place so this makes it easier to do.

    With the bike upside down (resting on the saddle and handlebars) loop the chain back over the same small sprocket, and then rotate the entire rear derailleur backwards so that it's fully out of the way. You can now drop the wheel into place near the dropouts with one hand whilst the other hand holds the rear derailleur back. If you're lucky you'll be able to guide the brake rotor into the caliper straight away.

    If the brake rotor doesn't go in first time, let go of the rear derailleur and rotate just the spring loaded derailleur cage round by hand. This takes all the tension off the chain so that you can easily guide the disc brake rotor into the correct position. Without any chain tension it makes it easier to line up and drop back into place.

  25. #25
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    At some point, I am going to have to cut the rear brake hose to shorten it. Is there a simple way to do that to avoid having to bleed the whole system? I plan on doing some test rides before cutting the hose so that I know what the brakes feel like out of the box.

    The only thing I have left to do is put on the grips. Then I'll double check all the bolts, read about the adjustments for the shock and fork, and I'll be ready for a test ride. Oh yeah, I still need to take the tubes out of my tires and fill the tires with Stan's sealant.

  26. #26
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    I've used this method a few times for shortening the hose without bleeding. Unlike the lever squeeze, this actually works

    http://www.shimano.com/publish/conte...20Trimming.pdf

  27. #27
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    Thanks! First test ride today, then I'll have to shorten up the rear hose.

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    Aside from the headache of mounting them, I'm curious how the new XT's perform. Please post your impressions after the ride.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by theZapper View Post
    Aside from the headache of mounting them, I'm curious how the new XT's perform. Please post your impressions after the ride.
    Xt's are not any harder to mount then any other brake. This seems like more of a case of user error (sorry OP) but I don't want these brakes to get a bad rap because of one persons problems. These are great brakes some of the best brakes and easiest I have used and I have Formula's, Magura Marta's, Hopes, Hayes Carbon's, BB7's, Juicy Ultimates all at different times of coarse but hands down I like the feel of these brakes over all others. Not a peep out of them either

  30. #30
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    I hate bean sprouts.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Xt's are not any harder to mount then any other brake. This seems like more of a case of user error (sorry OP)
    I tried mounting the front brake at least 50 times following the specific Shimano instructions. They are not hard to follow. The problem is: they are dead wrong. That fact has been confirmed by a number of people in this thread. This is my first mtb build, so if you want to call it operator error, fine.

    Aside from the headache of mounting them, I'm curious how the new XT's perform. Please post your impressions after the ride.
    They seemed to work fine. I noticed some rubbing on the front when I made a tight turn in the parking lot. I don't really understand how that is possible with a hydraulic system. I guess it could be wheel flex, but I have a Stan's Flow rim, Hadley 20mm TA hub, and Fox 36 Talas fork on the front end.

    On the trail, the brakes modulated better than on the workstand, where they seemed on/off. I weigh about 240 with gear and a pack full of tools, and the XT brakes stopped me fine with one finger. The reach to the lever is a little far for me--and I wear 3XL Fox Dirtpaw gloves. I have my XTR M980 shifters(XT's were out of stock) mounted between the brakes and the grip because that was the only configuration that allowed me to reach everything. I would like to get the brake closer, but if I switch the shifter and the brake, I can't reach the shifter. In what order do most people mount the shifter and the brake?

    This is my first mtb, but last year I demo'ed a lot of bikes at Outerbike, which were mostly equipped with XT brakes, and every time I touched the brakes on one of those bikes, I was almost catapulted over the bars. I'm a roadie, and I'm not used to such good brakes. I can't say whether the new XT's are better than the old XT's. If my new XT brakes don't leak, I'll be happy...and riding.

    I found a goathead in my front tire after my hour test ride, and when I got home both tires were flat. The final thing I have to do to finish my build is to remove the tubes and add Stan's sealant.

    As far as I know, no parts fell off the bike, and I didn't crash, so it was a successful test ride. I did hear a couple of horrendous metallic cracking noises while riding. I don't know if it was the crank or the shock/pivot area. I'll give the bike a once over tomorrow to see if anything looks amiss.
    Last edited by happyriding; 10-04-2011 at 12:07 AM.

  32. #32
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    2012 XT brakes are the best brakes ever. They are by far the easiest to set up and to service.

    If it does not work for you - bring it to a mechanic.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    2012 XT brakes are the best brakes ever. They are by far the easiest to set up and to service.

    If it does not work for you - bring it to a mechanic.
    +2, Knowing when you have reached the limits of your abilities is crucial when trying to save $$$. This is an awesome brake system!!!
    Last edited by zenkem; 10-04-2011 at 06:14 AM.

  34. #34
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    My 985 XTRs are hands down the easiest brakes to setup I've ever seen. I'm pretty sure the XTs are as easy.
    Last edited by PissedOffCil; 10-04-2011 at 05:58 AM.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

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    Don't bash on a product when you don't know how to properly set them up. Bring them to your LBS!!!!

  36. #36
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    User Error all the way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lipster94 View Post
    Don't bash on a product when you don't know how to properly set them up. Bring them to your LBS!!!!
    Okay, all you Shimano fan boys can go hold hands and sing "We are the World" in the "I love the new 2012 XT brakes" thread.

    It's funny how once some people buy a product, it has to be the best there is in order to validate their own self worth.

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    Knowing when you have reached the limits of your abilities is crucial when trying to save $$$.
    Point of fact: I got them set up on my own--by abandoning the Shimano instructions, so I hadn't reached the limit of my abilities yet. The replies hear confirmed that I did the right thing.

    In addition, forums like these are for getting help. So when I do reach the limit of my abilities, I can still avoid going to an LBS by asking questions here. The advice, "Take it to the LBS" is not what I am after unless the only course of action involves expensive specialized tools, which installing brakes does not require.

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Okay, all you Shimano fan boys can go hold hands and sing "We are the World" in the "I love the new 2012 XT brakes" thread.

    It's funny how once some people buy a product, it has to be the best there is in order to validate their own self worth.
    Hurray, let's dance in the rain!

    Seriously, I have a strong positive bias for Shimano. I love their products and speak greatly about them. Now, setting up a brake caliper is one of the simplest operations on a bike and is not rocket science. Admittedly I have the trail version with Servowave so their are certainly easier to setup in order to get no rub. However when someone comes complaining about how they hate their brakes and questioning the use of torx bolts on Shimano rotors, he loses all credibility.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

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    Hizzah! I'll dance with you. Love my new XTR trails

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    I bought the 2012 XT's a couple months ago and also had some brake rub issues. My problem was that I was tightening the bolts too quickly. After centering the caliper by depressing the brake lever, I would torque one caliper bolt. Problem is that I was tightening it down so hard it would angle the caliper ever so slightly so the whole body was crooked and the pads would rub.

    The solution is to tighten down the mounting bolts just 1/8-1/4 turn at a time. The caliper will stay parallel and the pads won't drag. Ever since I figured it out, I've had zero brake drag issues.
    "Got everything you need?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Okay, all you Shimano fan boys can go hold hands and sing "We are the World" in the "I love the new 2012 XT brakes" thread.

    It's funny how once some people buy a product, it has to be the best there is in order to validate their own self worth.
    I'm not so much of a Shimano fan but a fan of what works and right now it's the xt brakes. I would've loved to have my Formulas work and feel and nice as the xt's, it would've
    saved me a bunch of cash. Peace

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Okay, all you Shimano fan boys can go hold hands and sing "We are the World" in the "I love the new 2012 XT brakes" thread.

    It's funny how once some people buy a product, it has to be the best there is in order to validate their own self worth.
    It's also funny how when people give up on figuring out a problem, it's never their own ineptitude at fault. A bunch of people here have responded that were able to figure it out, why couldn't you?
    "Got everything you need?"

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    That's what the OP was doing wrong.

    Sometimes you have to be extremely delicate on this part of the process because the rotor is flimsy and will bend when trying to tighten down one caliper bolt then the other. I've used the squeeze the lever method many times on all kinds of disc brakes, old and new, and it's never failed me. Granted, that little tidbit should be in the instructions.
    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
    I bought the 2012 XT's a couple months ago and also had some brake rub issues. My problem was that I was tightening the bolts too quickly. After centering the caliper by depressing the brake lever, I would torque one caliper bolt. Problem is that I was tightening it down so hard it would angle the caliper ever so slightly so the whole body was crooked and the pads would rub.

    The solution is to tighten down the mounting bolts just 1/8-1/4 turn at a time. The caliper will stay parallel and the pads won't drag. Ever since I figured it out, I've had zero brake drag issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    I noticed some rubbing on the front when I made a tight turn in the parking lot. I don't really understand how that is possible with a hydraulic system. I guess it could be wheel flex, but I have a Stan's Flow rim, Hadley 20mm TA hub, and Fox 36 Talas fork on the front end.
    If you try holding the front wheel and rocking it from side to side can you see any play in the hub or the brake rotor moving at all?

    How tight did you fasten the Fox 20qr axle? It sounds like you may need to get the threaded thru axle fastened tighter before closing the two quick release levers on the fork if the brake rotor is twisting.

    Using the Quick-Release Lever

    It could also be something else like play in the hub bearings but the Fox 20qr is what I'd look at first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Okay, all you Shimano fan boys can go hold hands and sing "We are the World" in the "I love the new 2012 XT brakes" thread.

    It's funny how once some people buy a product, it has to be the best there is in order to validate their own self worth.
    It's also "funny" how you had problems with the cranks, chain and brakes. It tends to make us think there is a possibility that some amount of user error (also known as the learning curve) may be at play.

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    XT Brakes

    It took all these posts for someone to say the guy is not a mechanic?

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    When I had the previous XT brakes I had a similar problem, no matter how much I worked with them I couldn't stop them from rubbing. I would try to spin the wheel, hammer on the brakes, hold, turn each screw slightly until tight. After multiple attempts I pulled the pads and reset the pistons. Each time I'd do this and re-try setting them up I'd end up with the same problem. What I eventually found was that while I was re-setting the pistons I was leaving the bolts at the top and bottom of the caliper tight. This kept the caliper in the same alignment, although the pads were spread farther. Eventually I realized it would make sense to center the caliper over the rotor (by sight) AFTER re-installing the pads PRIOR to pulling the brake lever. This ensured the caliper was centered over the rotor and the pistons were being pushed out a similar distance on both sides. After I did this I never had another problem. I've had to do the same thing on different brakesets and had the same positive results.

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Okay, all you Shimano fan boys can go hold hands and sing "We are the World" in the "I love the new 2012 XT brakes" thread.

    It's funny how once some people buy a product, it has to be the best there is in order to validate their own self worth.
    What the heck are you talking about?

    I have bought, used and serviced Avid, Formula, Hope, and Shimano hydraulic brakes since I have went to disk brakes more then ten years ago. The fact that 2012 XT are the easiest to setup and to service among many models I have tried is just that - a simple observation of a fact. Just like the fact that Avid Ultimates that I have also bought are the worst.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiflow_21 View Post
    Eventually I realized it would make sense to center the caliper over the rotor (by sight) AFTER re-installing the pads PRIOR to pulling the brake lever. This ensured the caliper was centered over the rotor and the pistons were being pushed out a similar distance on both sides. After I did this I never had another problem. I've had to do the same thing on different brakesets and had the same positive results.
    Setting the caliper by sight, without pads, works very well for me with Shimano and Formula brakes. You just drop pads after centering, and it just works. This way if one piston was not retracted the same way, it just readjusts after I put the pads back in: good video from Hope: Hope Technology - Caliper/Pistons Centralise - YouTube

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