Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Green Wrencher
    Reputation: RDTigger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    245

    How much trouble are Avid Elixir 3's?

    About to buy my first bike and these are likely to be on it. I hear Hydro's are the best, I'd be happy with a bike to ride, lol.

    • Buying a bike from BDirect, how hard should these be to setup initially?
    • After setup will I need to bleed them initially?
    • Is there a way to bleed the brakes without buying a $30 kit from Avid?
    • How hard will it be to maintain them?
    • Just how good are they? Thought I would be working with Avid BB7's...

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GrapeNutsRobot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by RDTigger
    About to buy my first bike and these are likely to be on it. I hear Hydro's are the best, I'd be happy with a bike to ride, lol.

    • Buying a bike from BDirect, how hard should these be to setup initially?
    • After setup will I need to bleed them initially?
    • Is there a way to bleed the brakes without buying a $30 kit from Avid?
    • How hard will it be to maintain them?
    • Just how good are they? Thought I would be working with Avid BB7's...
    My wifes bike has Elixir 3s with approximately 200 miles on them. Answers to questions are below.
    Not hard, they come set up ready to be bolted to the bike.
    No
    Don't know have not had a need to yet.
    Have not had a need to maintain them yet
    Good enough, may not be the lightest but I haven't seen any issues with them compared to my 755 XTs or my 775 XTs.
    The Good Times are Killing me

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    235
    The only part of the bleed kit that is really necessary is the bleed fitting, you might be able to find that on EBay for about $5. The other parts syringe, tubing, and DOT fluid are easy to find cheap locally. But you may not need to bleed them at all for some time, some people go years without bleeding and their brakes still work like new. With a decent set of brakes and a little luck the only maintenance you'll need to do is replacing the pads which is very easy.

    Comparing hydros to BB7s is apple and oranges. The advantage of BB7s is that cables and housing can be replaced easier than hydro lines can be cut and bled. Also since the pads are individually adjustable it is a little simpler to eliminate drag. No cable brake can equal the light action of hydros and DOT fluid can last a lot longer than a cable.

  4. #4
    Green Wrencher
    Reputation: RDTigger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    245
    Thanks guys... I feel safer looking at hydros after reading the posts and doing some timely research!

    So many options and pros/cons to different techs in components... especially brakes, forks and such.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •