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  1. #1
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    how many change lever-grip distance

    In regard to brakes like the El Camino and others that have adjustments for the lever distance to the grip... how many of you have a brake with this option, and use it regularly?

    I'm more of a set-and-forget type of guy, but wanted to hear experiences from those that couldn't do without the ability to move the lever close/farther during a ride. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Trail Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    In regard to brakes like the El Camino and others that have adjustments for the lever distance to the grip... how many of you have a brake with this option, and use it regularly?

    I'm more of a set-and-forget type of guy, but wanted to hear experiences from those that couldn't do without the ability to move the lever close/farther during a ride. Thanks.
    I'm the same as far as set it and forget it. I'm having trouble with one of my brakes and the adjustment seems to be easier than an allen wrench. I agree that after the initial adjustment, I tend to leave it that way. It is nice to have a tool free adjustment.

  3. #3
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    I ride the Juicy 7's and have just realized how swank the lever position adjustment is. Formerly, I rode Avid vees and levers and never had any interest in reducing the reach on my levers (like on my wife's bike) because I have large enough hands to reach them and I liked being able to run my pads far enough off the rim to miss light mud, yet still have power and modulation in reserve on the brakes.

    Now, it turns out the Juicy 7's are so powerful that I have power and modulation in spades, so I started paying attention to hand fatigue on long days with a lot of descending. Of course, it's true that our hands are stronger and get less fatigue when we don't extend out our fingers so far to grab the brakes, so I've used the combination of my reach adjust setting and my pad position dial ( the red one) to run the levers closer to my fingers and it's excellent. Less fatigue on long days and it's easier to reach and control the brakes accurately when I'm off the back of the saddle.

    The El Camino looks to have the same adjustments.

  4. #4
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    The juicy pad adjustment knob breaks off very easily (a freind has juicy's on his jamis xlt, and another on his sc blur). That's probably why the new ElCaminos have ss instead of plastic knobs.
    As for lever reach adjustment, all hydros that I know of have this adjustment- allen wrench on inner lever- Hayes, Hope, etc.
    I always set and forget in order to have consistent feel and power delivery that's the same every time I hop on my trusty steed.
    As for the pad adjustment feature- might be nice, but I feel no need for it. Won't make me brake better or increase feel/modulation. I will never trade in my Hope monos. I would like to try the El Caminos though, and I do like the Juicy's, but just another marketing scheme to me.
    Schralp it Heavy.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeSATORI
    As for the pad adjustment feature- might be nice, but I feel no need for it. Won't make me brake better or increase feel/modulation. I will never trade in my Hope monos. I would like to try the El Caminos though, and I do like the Juicy's, but just another marketing scheme to me.
    Well, these factors may not come into play on your bike(s), so you may not know, but:

    --if your front and rear brake lines are of different lengths, and have ANY air in them, the f/r brakes will engage at different lever points. On some brakes this happens even after a good bleed, with no air in the system. The pad adjustment feature on the Hayes and Avid allow the rider to dial the pads so that each brake engages evenly with the other..or any other way you want.

    --if you use the reach adjustment feature that's prevalent on so many good hydro brake systems, the effect is identical to keeping the brakes "squeezed" a little, so the pistons stay extended and ride the pads closer to the rotor. The pad adjustment feature on the Avid and Hayes allow the rider to adjust reach, then back the pads back out so that the brakes not only engage when the rider wants them to, but don't ride so close to the rotor that they squeal or drag easily. This also improves modulation feel at "skid point", because it reduces the on/off lightswitch effect that some brakes get if the pads are set too close to the rotor.

    It's a safe bet that Hayes won't be the last to copy Avid's excellent idea reagarding pad adjustments at the lever.

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