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  1. #1
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    Reputation: JackRabbitSlims's Avatar
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    How Do I Shorten the Hydraulic Disc Hose??

    Full XT Brake setup - bought installed on the bike. Hose for both front and back brakes is too long and I would like to shorten.

    How do I go about this without making a huge mess? what tools and supplies do I need?

    Thanks in advance for any help or suggestions offered.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: oldskoolbiker's Avatar
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    Bare minimum if you know what you are doing (takes about 15 min per brake):
    New olive and barb-insert
    Something to cut the brake hose with (e.g., razor blade, cable cutters)
    Something to hold the brake hose tightly without crushing it to hammer in the new barb-insert (e.g., the yellow blocks with grooves that usually come with Shimano brakes)
    A Hammer
    Something to spread pads apart (e.g., a Screwdriver)
    Allen wrench to take caliper off
    Wrench to loosen retaining bolt (not sure about name of this)

    Here is the procedure (doesn't require bleeding)
    1) Remove the caliper from the bike, just let it hang to the side beside the wheel.
    2) Pump the lever until you make the brake pads touch together.
    3) Pull the rubber boot down on your lever to expose the retaining bolt
    4) completely loosen the retaining bolt and slide it down the hose
    5) Pull the hose out of the lever (it may be difficult to pull out)
    6) While watching out for dripping fluid out of the hose, figure out where you want to cut the hose
    7) Cut the hose with something that will give a clean square cut
    8) Put the new olive onto the hose
    9) Hammer the new insert into the hose
    10) Insert the hose into the lever, and slide up the retaining bolt.
    11) Tighten the retaining bolt (it should be pretty tight, but don't over do it)
    12) Slide the rubber boot back up
    13) Force the brake pads back apart and fully retract the pistons.
    13) Reattach the caliper, but don't fully tighten the bolts.
    14) Pump the lever until the pads get reset to proper position
    15) While holding the lever, tighten the caliper bolts.

    That should do it. If after this procedure the lever is mushy, then you'll need to give the brake a full bleed, which will require mineral oil, a rubber hose, and a catch bottle.

  3. #3
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    Wicked!

    You kind Sir are Freaken Awesome!

    Thanks so much for taking the time to write that out.....I really appreciate it.

    Cheers

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldskoolbiker
    Bare minimum if you know what you are doing (takes about 15 min per brake):
    New olive and barb-insert
    Something to cut the brake hose with (e.g., razor blade, cable cutters)
    Something to hold the brake hose tightly without crushing it to hammer in the new barb-insert (e.g., the yellow blocks with grooves that usually come with Shimano brakes)
    A Hammer
    Something to spread pads apart (e.g., a Screwdriver)
    Allen wrench to take caliper off
    Wrench to loosen retaining bolt (not sure about name of this)

    Here is the procedure (doesn't require bleeding)
    1) Remove the caliper from the bike, just let it hang to the side beside the wheel.
    2) Pump the lever until you make the brake pads touch together.
    3) Pull the rubber boot down on your lever to expose the retaining bolt
    4) completely loosen the retaining bolt and slide it down the hose
    5) Pull the hose out of the lever (it may be difficult to pull out)
    6) While watching out for dripping fluid out of the hose, figure out where you want to cut the hose
    7) Cut the hose with something that will give a clean square cut
    8) Put the new olive onto the hose
    9) Hammer the new insert into the hose
    10) Insert the hose into the lever, and slide up the retaining bolt.
    11) Tighten the retaining bolt (it should be pretty tight, but don't over do it)
    12) Slide the rubber boot back up
    13) Force the brake pads back apart and fully retract the pistons.
    13) Reattach the caliper, but don't fully tighten the bolts.
    14) Pump the lever until the pads get reset to proper position
    15) While holding the lever, tighten the caliper bolts.

    That should do it. If after this procedure the lever is mushy, then you'll need to give the brake a full bleed, which will require mineral oil, a rubber hose, and a catch bottle.
    This is very helpful, can you tell me what does step 2 do? I was told bleeding might not be necessary also.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorCyclist
    This is very helpful, can you tell me what does step 2 do? I was told bleeding might not be necessary also.
    When you put the hose back together and retract the pistons with the pads, it forces the air in the hose to go into the reservoir negating the need to bleed.

  6. #6
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    OK that make sense
    I was told never to squeeze the lever without the rotor in place
    I have the M486 not the XT just wondering if it will be OK.
    But it looks like as the pads wear the pistons would experience almost as much extension.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorCyclist
    ...
    I was told never to squeeze the lever without the rotor in place...
    That's only if you are not going to drain the system, then yes never pull on the lever without the disc (exceptions exist of course).

    Bryan D
    Just keep pedaling, don't stop pedaling.

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