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  1. #1
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    how do i run v-brakes on a disc-only frame?

    Hey, I have a 2004 Hardrock Pro and I wanna switch over to v-brakes cos the discs that are on it right now really suck **** and i have a set of carbon trispoke wheels that my uncle gave me and i wanna run on the bike, but it's not disc compatible. So the cheapest way to upgrade my braking performance is to throw on some highend v-brakes. Besides, this will be used for commuting mainly anyway. Any ideas? Are there any sort of "V-Brake Adaptors" similar to the "Disc Brake Adaptors" that are so common now? Please help. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Easy, you don't. The brake boss mounts are welded to the frame, the only way that I know of will be to take the frame to a builder/welder and have him weld be boss mounts. If you do that say goodbye to your warranty.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by synkronized23
    Hey, I have a 2004 Hardrock Pro and I wanna switch over to v-brakes cos the discs that are on it right now really suck **** and i have a set of carbon trispoke wheels that my uncle gave me and i wanna run on the bike, but it's not disc compatible. So the cheapest way to upgrade my braking performance is to throw on some highend v-brakes. Besides, this will be used for commuting mainly anyway. Any ideas? Are there any sort of "V-Brake Adaptors" similar to the "Disc Brake Adaptors" that are so common now? Please help. Thanks.
    Sell the bike and buy one with v-bosses.

    Or just upgrade your disc brakes (you can get f&r Avids for ~$175) and forget about the heavy, clunky trispoke wheels.
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  4. #4
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    You're going to commute on fancy carbon trispoke wheels? Please tell me you're not gonna be locking it up outside like that...

    Here's my philosophy on commuter bikes though, so you know why I think using those wheels is a bade idea. If you have the option of locking up indoors in a controlled area, this is all null and void. I'm thinking only of areas where you'r locking up outside, locking up in public areas and where the bike will see a lot of day to day usage that doesn't always call for high end stuff.

    IMHO, flashy paint, obviously high end components (like fancy carbon trispoke wheels,) big name brand stickers, etc, is thief bait. Highly priced lightweight components are things that will get beaten up on the bike rack by other people locking and unlocking their bikes. This is problematic sometimes for carbon fiber, since scratches and scoring, whether from punk teenagers of repetitive use of a bike lock, can weaken the fiber structure. And while wheels are generally built to be strong, carbon is carbon, and you want to keep it relatively safe from certain things if you want to use it for a long time.

    I'm with Shiggy. There are too many good disc brakes out there that work very well, particularly avids. The "cheapest way to upgrade your braking performance" woudl be to simply replace the brakes you have. It'll be a lot easier to simply swap brakes, I'd think, than to go through the process of swapping everything from one frame to the other. ANd uless you're doing the work yourself, it'll save you a lot on labor, too.

    If you're bound and determined to use at least one wheel, I suppose it's possible to switch the front to a V-brake, since I haven't seen too many disc only forks, and on the road, you should be using your front brake more anyway. But that just seems silly, somehow. It's a frankenstein half measure that doesn't really do justice to either the bike or the wheels.

    Honestly, I think if you really want to use those wheels, I dont' blame you if they're that nice. I've had wheelsets that have collected dust while I tried to find a place for them, because they were too nice, and I didn't want to get rid of them. But forget them on this frame, and work first with the bike you have. If it's already a good commuter bike, buy some servicable disc brakes first. Then research what sorts of bikes those carbon wheels are normally used for, and build a bike around them. It'll be a lot of fun, you'll learn a lot in the process, and you won't suffer the same crushing heartbreak if you come outside and find that some nitwit has run over one of them while it was locked up by the roadside.

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