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  1. #1
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    how can i straighten out my rotor

    its off just enough to rub a little on my brake pads each time it goes around. you can hardly hear it, but when i brake, it pulsates and feels rough. the rotor looks and feels fine tho

    i already tried the zip tie (as a guide), adjustable wrench (to bend it back) trick, which helped a little, but i think thats about as close as i can get it

    im trying not to spend any $, but if i must, i must

    any other tricks, thoughts, etc. i dont have many tools lying around, not even a vise, but a buddy has some stuff

    thanks

    ps, the brakes are 6" Juicy 3s
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  2. #2
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    Hang in a stand and use a white rag or old t-shirt as a backdrop on the floor. Look at the brake down onto the rag and you'll be able to more accurately see where the rotor needs most work. Park does make a tool for this but as mentioned you can use a crescent wrench to make your adjustments.

    Sometimes the issue could be fixed by adjusting the caliper as it may have moved after a crash.

  3. #3
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    ill try the t shirt trick. thanks
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  4. #4
    Plays with tools
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    Your going about it in the right manor. And the white backdrop definitely makes it easier. Sometimes it's just a PITB

  5. #5
    SANCTUS
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    the Park rotor tool is really nice and fits the rotor very well to avoid damage, they really do not cost that much.

  6. #6
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    I've had the best luck using my hands to bend a rotor straight.
    Use gloves!

  7. #7
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    Tools and their uses

    Here is a nice referenceTools and Their Uses - Humor

  8. #8
    SANCTUS
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    This is what gloves are forPhotobucket

  9. #9
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    the whole Adjustable wrench thing works only about 50% of the time as the issue with the rotor is usually closer to the hub plate not out at the pads contact face. Quite often I've seen guys rotors that are "dished" or have "s" bends in the arms as they use the Adj wrench and it wont reach in far enough. They get it lined up but the area becomes weakened and it just warps again in no time. The Park tool works great! worth the 8 bucks. a straight metal ruler helps to find the exact spot the rotor is warped.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    the whole Adjustable wrench thing works only about 50% of the time as the issue with the rotor is usually closer to the hub plate not out at the pads contact face. Quite often I've seen guys rotors that are "dished" or have "s" bends in the arms as they use the Adj wrench and it wont reach in far enough. They get it lined up but the area becomes weakened and it just warps again in no time. The Park tool works great! worth the 8 bucks. a straight metal ruler helps to find the exact spot the rotor is warped.
    how does the Park Tool work... it looks nothing more than a guide

    yes, im completely new to all this

    thanks
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  11. #11
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    how does the Park Tool work... it looks nothing more than a guide

    yes, im completely new to all this

    thanks
    ya it works, it's really nothing more than a wrench like these guys are saying, just has longer fingers so it can reach down toward the hub more

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    ya it works, it's really nothing more than a wrench like these guys are saying, just has longer fingers so it can reach down toward the hub more
    alright, thanks
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  13. #13
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    bring them to a machine shop or brake shop and get them turned. you can try other methods on your own but that is the only way to get them true again.

  14. #14
    007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetta2010 View Post
    bring them to a machine shop or brake shop and get them turned. you can try other methods on your own but that is the only way to get them true again.
    I'm not sure if you are serious or not so I'll bite . . . bike rotors can't be turned. They are only 2mm thick to start with!

    I've finally come to perfect (in my opinion) truing a rotor. It takes TONS of patience and a really good ear. I do use a piece of white paper but only so I can tell which pad the rotor is rubbing against. I do not use the paper to sight where the rotor is bent. I figure out where based on listening as it passes through the caliper.

    I also use gloves and my fingers. A rotor bend creates 3 points of misalignment. 1) the starting point. 2) the midpoint of the arc, and 3) the stopping point. When I have found an out-of-true spot, I put my middle finger on the midpoint of the arc and my 1st and 3rd fingers on the end points. Thumb as close to the center of the rotors as possible and pull (or push) SLIGHTLY. It takes VERY little force to bend the rotor.

    Rinse and repeat until true. If you are doing it correctly, you will notice the arc of your bend getting smaller each time until its gone. It usually takes me anywhere from 2 to 10 minutes to true a rotor this way.

    Note: I NEVER use tools/wrenches of any kind as they can damage the brake track and apply to much force.
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  15. #15
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    so i got it more straight, its not rubbing, but you can hear that its not perfectly straight when you start to squeeze the lever. it goes chink, chink, chink, as the wheel goes around.

    i may play with it some more just to see how good i can get it.

    thanks for all the replays
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  16. #16
    007
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    Rarely ever will you get a rotor perfectly true. Before you go messing with it again, try giving it a REAL good run down a looooong hill if you can. In other words, try to get it good and hot and see if that helps. Sometimes it does (for example with my Hope 2-piece rotors, getting em good and hot can straighten out slight variations.)
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by OO7 View Post
    Rarely ever will you get a rotor perfectly true. Before you go messing with it again, try giving it a REAL good run down a looooong hill if you can. In other words, try to get it good and hot and see if that helps. Sometimes it does (for example with my Hope 2-piece rotors, getting em good and hot can straighten out slight variations.)
    good idea. i do have some huge long hills around here

    thanks
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

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