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  1. #1
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    Hosed off Bike, now Rear Brake Squeals and Vibrates

    I found out today that my bike was gratuitously hosed off with water to help me "clean" it...

    This had me concerned in many areas, but the most notable damage is the rear brake.

    The grab of the pads is diminished and it squeals extremely loudly. These are XTR brakes with XTR Resin pads... they were almost silent before.

    On top of the squealing, the rear vibrates now if I brake hard

    What can I do to fix this? I tried rubbing down the disc with alcohol but the problem seems to be greater than that

  2. #2
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    Try taking a fine grit sand paper and sanding off the pads.

  3. #3
    On wuss patrol
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    Uh, ride it for about five minutes, doing some hard stops and some easier stops to heat things up a little and they should be back to quieter. Almost all brakes make a little noise when wet and cold (kinda like my kids) and have to be brought to operating temp to tone it down.
    Last edited by Glide the Clyde; 12-27-2010 at 05:51 PM.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    Uh, ride it for about five minutes, doing some hard stops and some easier stops to heat things up a little and they should be back to quieter. Almost all brakes make a little noise when wet and cold (kinda like my kids) and have to be brought to operating temp to tone it down.
    +1^

  5. #5
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    Unfortunately the brake caliper, rotors and pads are completely ruined. When H2O comes into contact with mountain bike brakes it causes an irreversible chemical reaction that renders them inoperable. The results vary by manufacturer but in a nutshell your brakes are toast. That is why brake manufacturers recommend you only ride in fair weather. You might try to unload them on e-bay but make sure you mention they got wet or you might be held liable if the new owner gets hurt while using them. Good luck.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by osmarandsara
    Unfortunately the brake caliper, rotors and pads are completely ruined. When H2O comes into contact with mountain bike brakes it causes an irreversible chemical reaction that renders them inoperable. The results vary by manufacturer but in a nutshell your brakes are toast. That is why brake manufacturers recommend you only ride in fair weather. You might try to unload them on e-bay but make sure you mention they got wet or you might be held liable if the new owner gets hurt while using them. Good luck.

    No they are not "ruined" when a little water gets on them. I've ridden in the mud and rain with my Avid Juicy's and the braking hasn't been detrimentally affected even after weeks of sitting in the basement after a wet ride. Just have to worry about oily groundwater/mud but even then people have cleaned them with alcohol and scrubbing with sandpaper.

    If OP hosed down his pads and oily residue got on it, then it's a different matter.. Try going on a light ride and ride the brakes periodically to perhaps ground out and freshen up the pad/rotors.

    Mines make some sounds in the wet, but you can try dragging the brakes a sec or 2 earlier to scrape the crud from the surface.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by osmarandsara
    Unfortunately the brake caliper, rotors and pads are completely ruined. When H2O comes into contact with mountain bike brakes it causes an irreversible chemical reaction that renders them inoperable. The results vary by manufacturer but in a nutshell your brakes are toast. That is why brake manufacturers recommend you only ride in fair weather. You might try to unload them on e-bay but make sure you mention they got wet or you might be held liable if the new owner gets hurt while using them. Good luck.
    Let me guess. The OP probably should send you a PM so you can take those "ruined" XTR brakes off his hands.

    The brakes are in NO way ruined BTW.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  8. #8
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    For posts 6 and 7....
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  9. #9
    Bike Addiction
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    I ruin my brakes every weekend. Muddy, rinse... repeat! Fun fun fun
    Disclaimer: Always get a second opinion cause I'm just guessing

  10. #10
    Give it a crank
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    This is really funny, not just the sarcasm, but think about this: weight weenies are constantly looking for ways to go faster by reducing weight. And you just found the perfect solution for their needs: go faster by loosing the brakes entirely!

  11. #11
    sm4
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    for xhimano resin type pad after few hard stiff down hill overheated the pad compound already damage expecialy the rear one.swap the pad from the front to rear, to confirm before replace new pad,high mostly vibration and sounds come from
    brake pad.

  12. #12
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    I run the same brakes and pads that you do and wash my rotors and pads with copious amounts of water after nearly each ride. I run the hose on the calipers while spinning the wheels to remove any grit from them. My brakes don't squeal, but I'm thinking it's because they dry out before my next ride. If I soak my brakes while riding thats a different story, they can squeal like crazy and lose tons of power. The only thing to do is use them hard and heat them up until they dry out.

    If on the other hand you got soap on your rotors while washing they will squeal bad. I washed my rotors ONCE (never again) with soap and they were ear splitting. Ended up using brake clean on the pads and rotors as well as sanding them both. Good luck.

    Cheers,
    Straw
    Ease & Flow Where Ever I Go

  13. #13
    It's about showing up.
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    Not just one thing

    I can't tell you how many problems I have run into on my machines which seemed to be "caused" by a specific event. It is easy to point to the washing, as a chemical effect, but that would be too easy.

    Other less episodic will factors may be at play. Temperatures have changed and the way that dirt and contaminants move around due to moisture on the trail has changed as well. What was once a liquid filled with dirt and mineral particles in has now dried and found its way into all sorts of places. Once dried, just like in the summertime, squeaking and creaking occurs. Further due to temperature changes some things may have loosened up. It sounds like it might be worth your while to pull things apart a bit.

    Remove your wheel and remove your disc brake pads from the caliper. Give everything a really good clean, sanding the paths a bit with really fine paper and reinstall them. Double check that your rotors have not become loosened or you have not fractured one of the attaching torx bolts. Check that your drops are clean and not bent and that your axle surfaces are clean. Clean your skewer and your centering springs and reinstall. This might do the trick. If not, this is something you need to do once in a while anyhow.

    Previous suggestions of running the bike hard with heavy braking are totally appropriate. I have a very long and very steep hill near the house that I use for bedding a new brake system. It works every time.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Berkeley Mike; 01-01-2011 at 03:08 PM.

  14. #14
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    light sandpaper to the pads, and rubbing alcohol or simple green on the rims to take any brake grime off of the rim surface.

    Also make sure your pads are 'toed in' properly.

  15. #15
    Biking Like Crazy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solitude
    light sandpaper to the pads, and rubbing alcohol or simple green on the rims to take any brake grime off of the rim surface.

    Also make sure your pads are 'toed in' properly.

    I think the OP has disc brakes...not V brakes!

  16. #16
    Weird huh?
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman
    I think the OP has disc brakes...not V brakes!
    I run Avid BB7's and have always used the optional toe in clip between each pad and piston...seems to make far less noise when the front of the pads contact the rotor first...
    Poaching Demo...that's why we can't have nice things...

  17. #17
    Biking Like Crazy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmdrpiffle
    I run Avid BB7's and have always used the optional toe in clip between each pad and piston...seems to make far less noise when the front of the pads contact the rotor first...
    I don't think that "optional clip" is really a tow in clip, but more of a "manditory" pads seperater to keeps the pads from rubbing when not in use!.
    What I was referring to was Solitudes comment about cleaning the RIM!

  18. #18
    Weird huh?
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman
    I don't think that "optional clip" is really a tow in clip, but more of a "manditory" pads seperater to keeps the pads from rubbing when not in use!.
    What I was referring to was Solitudes comment about cleaning the RIM!
    just wow
    Poaching Demo...that's why we can't have nice things...

  19. #19
    Biking Like Crazy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmdrpiffle
    just wow
    Please watch that language! LOL
    I could be wrong about the usage of the clip I admit, BUT my main point was
    Solitude DID mention cleaning the RIM!.
    WOW! WOW! WOW!

    edit... excuse my language. I re-read you post and you did say clip btwn piston and pad. You are right if they have such a clip.
    I was thought you were meaning the pad seperater clip.
    Honest mistake!

  20. #20
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    I cut the brakes off my bmx bike. It's good for when you want to man up, you can't hit the breaks to slow down before you a hit a big set, that way you won't puss out. Prob would help some mtbrs to lose their brakes too!! Plus think how easy u could climb if u lost 1lb, that's like taking a big dump before you ride, the benefits are infinite.

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