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  1. #1
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    Hope Mono Mini Bleed Question?

    I am about to shorten the hoses on my Hope mini's and was curious on how difficult this might be. I've ordered the hope bleed kit and I assume it comes with directions but just wondering if there are any tried and true methods that might make the job easier?

    Any help is much appreciated!

  2. #2
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    A bleed is not necessary for this. That is the beauty of the Hopes. The book will tell you how to do it. All you're basically doing is unscrewing the hose from the lever assembly and taking the metal end/olive off the end of the hose. The pressure from the caliper will keep the oil in. One thing for sure...use a proper hose/housing cutter for this. Scissors will not cut it (hurr hurr). I've had plenty of luck using the book instructions along with the guides on here. Do a search and you're bound to find a useful thread on it.

    Keep the bleed kit around for future use, or if you happen to mess it up somehow.

    Cheers and good luck!
    If the rig made the rider, I'd be pro...

  3. #3
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    Just be sure to keep the end of the housing pointed up not down or the fluid will drain out. Which will require a bleed.

    The instructions are actually helpful and can be found on the Hope website if your set didn't come with any (mine didn't)

    I'm not sure what comes in a bleed kit but for 8 bucks at your local auto supply store, you can get a plastic cup with cap and hose that fits onto the bleed screw.

    good luck.
    But you were just a blood sucking demon, these guys are lawyers.

  4. #4
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    Shortening the hoses is possible without a bleed. Before you re-attach the hose to the master cylinder, pull the brake lever enough to give a small drop of fluid at the barb then push the hose on. Nine times out of ten you will not require a bleed with this method. If you do get a little air in the line it can usually be forced out by laying the bike on it's side with the master cylinder at the highest point. Squeeze the lever and hold the pressure as hard as you can while tapping the line with something, this helps the bubbles float to the top. Release pressure and try the brakes again, a couple of cycles of this may be needed to get the air out, but it is a lot easier, quicker and cleaner than a complete bleed.

    HTH

  5. #5
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    I would always bleed, no matter what. Open a hydraulic system to air, it must be bled. Removing and shortening any lines is not 100% lossless. It is possible to minimize the loss to where it doesn't completely affect performance and feel, but it's good practice to do this, as this is a safety device.

    Luckily, Hope brakes are incredibly easy to bleed and DOT fluid is very inexpensive. The bleeding procedure is as easy as a car.

    The Hope method, if you don't have a small hose and a capture syringe:

    1. Wrap a rag around the bleeder valve.
    2. Position a wrench (8mm, I believe) on the bleeder valve.
    3. Pull on lever until resistance is felt.
    4. Slowly open bleeder valve, allow lever to move towards bar slowly.
    5. Close bleeder valve before the lever bottoms out.
    6. Release lever, start at step 3 again.

    You have to open the reservoir and make sure it's pointed up and that it's filled at all times.

    Incredibly easy and more bike manufacturers should be doing this instead of the pressurized reservoirs.

  6. #6
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    I agree with Jerk_Chicken about always bleeding if you open the system. Check out this thread if you need a detailed instruction.
    .
    .


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by arc angel adventures
    I am about to shorten the hoses on my Hope mini's and was curious on how difficult this might be. I've ordered the hope bleed kit and I assume it comes with directions but just wondering if there are any tried and true methods that might make the job easier?

    Any help is much appreciated!
    I've done it at the lever and didn't need a bleed but i had some DOT on hand just in case i needed it. I just used Park cable cutters to cut the hose but a razor blade would do it or you could get the cheapie shimano hose cutter that shops always throw away in the trash.

    For bleeding i prefer to push fluid from the caliper up to the levers. Its the quickest and easiest way for me to do bleed brakes.

  8. #8
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    Thank you for the easy to bleed Hope system instructions. I have a set of Hope Mono Minis and I love them, even more now that I know how easy it is to bleed them, just like dirt bike discs.

    Wayne

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    I agree with Jerk_Chicken about always bleeding if you open the system. Check out this thread if you need a detailed instruction.
    Not trying to be a d**k, but is there a reason for recommending a complete bleed? I have 5 sets of Hopes and have helped install many others and have always used this method with great success so far. Just wondering why you feel the need for a complete bleed?

  10. #10
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    One could ask what the aversion you have is for bleeding the brakes and doing a job properly on a system made to be bled in only a few minutes.

    No matter what, if the system is opened anywhere between the endpoints, air will be drawn in, along with moisture. Fluid is hygroscopic, with even the LMA versions being less. No matter what you do, even adding fluid dropwise to the open ports, there will always be a small volume of air introduced or stuck to surfaces, such as the banjo fittings.

    For systems that use cheap fluid, such as DOT and have provisions for easy and quick bleeding, it doesn't make any sense whatsoever to not do a job right that you can take pride in and eliminate the possibility of poor performing brakes over time by simply spending another 5 minutes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    One could ask what the aversion you have is for bleeding the brakes and doing a job properly on a system made to be bled in only a few minutes.
    Like Hope themselves say, it isn't necessary.

    For someone who is familiar with bleeding car/motorcycle brakes, the Hopes are easy to bleed. Those people know when to open/close the bleed valve relative to the lever, the risks of spilled fluid, how to keep your pads/pistons from becoming stuck shut, and more. If you've never done it before, there is a good chance you are just going to fill the lines with air, make a mess, and have an unridable bike until you take it to a shop to be schooled.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    No matter what, if the system is opened anywhere between the endpoints, air will be drawn in, along with moisture. Fluid is hygroscopic, with even the LMA versions being less.
    In that case (moisture concern), the master cylinder cover should never be removed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    For systems that use cheap fluid, such as DOT and have provisions for easy and quick bleeding, it doesn't make any sense whatsoever to not do a job right that you can take pride in and eliminate the possibility of poor performing brakes over time by simply spending another 5 minutes.
    I'm a proponent of doing it right, and doing it yourself, so I think someone who owns Hopes should learn how to bleed them (especially considering all you need is a single piece of tubing to do it). HOWEVER, given Hope provides instructions for shortening the hoses without rebleeding them, taking that shortcut is absolutely reasonable.

  12. #12
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    I couldn't care less what Hope says. They know most consumers are idiots.

    What I say is brakes are safety equipment and Hope has made them to be easily bled for a reason. Anyone with the ability to turn a wrench can do it.

    What Hope says is wrong and I won't defend that. What aligns with logic and safety is doing the job right and recommending people do so, not doing it the wrong way. This is what is reasonable. I won't trust my safety or make a recommendation about someone else's simply because some idiot in Hope's offices said it was ok in an effort to get an ede on the competition or something.

    In that case (moisture concern), the master cylinder cover should never be removed.
    Zero sense is being made here, especially when referencing what you were responding to.

    I'm a proponent of doing it right, and doing it yourself,
    Apparently not, since you mention the paradox of how it should be done right, but you read the manual that says you can do it the wrong way, on top of knowing you're doing it wrong.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    I couldn't care less what Hope says. They know most consumers are idiots.

    What I say is brakes are safety equipment and Hope has made them to be easily bled for a reason. Anyone with the ability to turn a wrench can do it.

    What Hope says is wrong and I won't defend that. What aligns with logic and safety is doing the job right and recommending people do so, not doing it the wrong way. This is what is reasonable. I won't trust my safety or make a recommendation about someone else's simply because some idiot in Hope's offices said it was ok in an effort to get an ede on the competition or something.



    Zero sense is being made here, especially when referencing what you were responding to.



    Apparently not, since you mention the paradox of how it should be done right, but you read the manual that says you can do it the wrong way, on top of knowing you're doing it wrong.
    I think what JC is saying here - is that the only way to be sure that the job is done right, is to do it right! Half measures and hack jobs are just that.

    FWIW, my mono mini's didn't work properly after the hack job method - and were vastly improved once bleading them properly!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    I would always bleed, no matter what. Open a hydraulic system to air, it must be bled. Removing and shortening any lines is not 100% lossless. It is possible to minimize the loss to where it doesn't completely affect performance and feel, but it's good practice to do this, as this is a safety device.

    Luckily, Hope brakes are incredibly easy to bleed and DOT fluid is very inexpensive. The bleeding procedure is as easy as a car.

    The Hope method, if you don't have a small hose and a capture syringe:

    1. Wrap a rag around the bleeder valve.
    2. Position a wrench (8mm, I believe) on the bleeder valve.
    3. Pull on lever until resistance is felt.
    4. Slowly open bleeder valve, allow lever to move towards bar slowly.
    5. Close bleeder valve before the lever bottoms out.
    6. Release lever, start at step 3 again.

    You have to open the reservoir and make sure it's pointed up and that it's filled at all times.

    Incredibly easy and more bike manufacturers should be doing this instead of the pressurized reservoirs.
    After using advise from this forum and Hope stating that this could be done without a bleed I tried it. The front brake felt like the factory setting when I finished. Rear- a totally different story. Mushy and lever went 1/2 way to bars before any braking power. Mind you I only had the bike in the work stand so I'm sure I would not have stopped at all if I had my weight on the bike.

    I have never bled a pair of brakes by myself so I was a little skeptical. Using the Hope bleed kit I bled the rear in about 30 minutes as I didn't know what I was doing at first. I don't know if all systems bleed as easy as this but the results were amazing. The rear brake is jam up better than it felt from the factory.

    had such great results I bled the front in about 10 min and dang it feels better than factory.

    Thanks for the input!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    One could ask what the aversion you have is for bleeding the brakes and doing a job properly on a system made to be bled in only a few minutes.

    No matter what, if the system is opened anywhere between the endpoints, air will be drawn in, along with moisture. Fluid is hygroscopic, with even the LMA versions being less. No matter what you do, even adding fluid dropwise to the open ports, there will always be a small volume of air introduced or stuck to surfaces, such as the banjo fittings.

    For systems that use cheap fluid, such as DOT and have provisions for easy and quick bleeding, it doesn't make any sense whatsoever to not do a job right that you can take pride in and eliminate the possibility of poor performing brakes over time by simply spending another 5 minutes.

    Actually I don't have an aversion to bleeding brakes, I have done it several times to the Hopes over the years along with several car and motorcycle sets.

    Most hose shortenings occur at the initial install, i.e. when the fluid is till perfectly serviceable. Why replace this? Brake fluid is a particularly nasty substance, I am betting that over 90% of it is not disposed of correctly and ends up in the water system.

    If you are lucky you will get no air present in the system so there is absolutely no need to bleed the brakes though. If you get a little air in there it is easily removed by squeezing the lever and tapping the line. In fact doing a full bleed will more than likely lead to greater water ingress due to the master cylinder cap being removed and the fluid exposed to the moist air that will ultimately be trapped in the reservoir.

    If the fluid is more than 6 months old or there is already air in lines I would consider doing a full bleed, if neither of these apply then don't bother.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by arc angel adventures
    After using advise from this forum and Hope stating that this could be done without a bleed I tried it. The front brake felt like the factory setting when I finished. Rear- a totally different story. Mushy and lever went 1/2 way to bars before any braking power. Mind you I only had the bike in the work stand so I'm sure I would not have stopped at all if I had my weight on the bike.

    I have never bled a pair of brakes by myself so I was a little skeptical. Using the Hope bleed kit I bled the rear in about 30 minutes as I didn't know what I was doing at first. I don't know if all systems bleed as easy as this but the results were amazing. The rear brake is jam up better than it felt from the factory.

    had such great results I bled the front in about 10 min and dang it feels better than factory.

    Thanks for the input!
    Arc Angel,

    I have requested a DIY section and if approved, I will put up procedures like this in great detail.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Furrner
    Actually I don't have an aversion to bleeding brakes, I have done it several times to the Hopes over the years along with several car and motorcycle sets.

    Most hose shortenings occur at the initial install, i.e. when the fluid is till perfectly serviceable. Why replace this? Brake fluid is a particularly nasty substance, I am betting that over 90% of it is not disposed of correctly and ends up in the water system.

    If you are lucky you will get no air present in the system so there is absolutely no need to bleed the brakes though. If you get a little air in there it is easily removed by squeezing the lever and tapping the line. In fact doing a full bleed will more than likely lead to greater water ingress due to the master cylinder cap being removed and the fluid exposed to the moist air that will ultimately be trapped in the reservoir.

    If the fluid is more than 6 months old or there is already air in lines I would consider doing a full bleed, if neither of these apply then don't bother.
    I still don't agree, as air contains moisture when hygroscopic fluid is exposed to air, it will absorb the water and some reactions can take place that cause an accelerated deterioration of the fluid and attack of components over time. I made my case, you made yours and it's up to the readers to pick their poison.

    Brake fluid is extraordinarily cheap, such as the valvoline synthetic, being $5/quart at Autozone. Spills are way overrated. Simply clean it up and it's done, should there be a spill. If you're careful, it's no trouble.

    When one does a job on a safety component, it should always be done right.

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