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  1. #1
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    Hope Bleed Kit for Tech Levers?


  2. #2
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    You don't need all that. Get a hose that fits over the bleed nipple tightly, torx screwdriver for the reservoir cap, 8mm (i think) wrench to open the bleed valve and that's it.


    The Hopes are very easy to bleed.

    And watch this: www.hopegb.com/page_mep_force_56.htm

  3. #3
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    U better ask the shop, CRC told me last month that all new bleed kits they will be receiving from Hope from now on will support Tech levers, but it won't harm to keep asking them until they add this info to the product description

  4. #4
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    There is absolutely no need for the Hope bleed kit, whatsoever. They are the easiest brakes to bleed and adding the bleed kit only takes time and adds a bit more complexity.

    I have posted a procedure somewhere in the past. It's short, and works. Basically, pull the lever, then slowly crack the bleed valve and pull the lever towards the bar, closing the valve before it bottoms out. Do this a few times while making sure the reservoir is full and you're done.

    I also sometimes remove the fluid from the reservoir and replace with new fluid to start, but it's not neccessary.

  5. #5
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    I agree with the others. Don't waste your money on the kit. Get an 8mm wrench for the bleed valve and buy a foot of the proper sized hosing. The bleed is as simple as it gets. My "bleed kit" cost $3.49 for the wrench and $.15 for the hosing.

  6. #6
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    Ok, I'll use the regular method in bleeding then. Just thought I might get more air out since air naturally rises and the bleed kit pushes the fluid up from the caliper.

  7. #7
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    just follow the published video at Hope...
    http://www.hopegb.com/page_mep_force_4.html

    it's really pretty easy ...

  8. #8
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    So, the question I've got is where to buy (in the USA) "the right size tubing" that everybody keeps mentioning. I've found clear vinyl tubing at home depot that fits on the nipple, but not very snug and leaks oil....and that was the absolute smallest they had, and was a little too hard and stiff to grip well. Tried the home brew shop, and they had latex tubing that was nice and stretchy & grippy, but nothing that small. Help me out guys...what the heck am I missing?

  9. #9
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    i pushed 1/8 aquarium tubing over the fat bleed nipple. works fine. use your muscles

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by doismellbacon
    So, the question I've got is where to buy (in the USA) "the right size tubing" that everybody keeps mentioning. I've found clear vinyl tubing at home depot that fits on the nipple, but not very snug and leaks oil....and that was the absolute smallest they had, and was a little too hard and stiff to grip well. Tried the home brew shop, and they had latex tubing that was nice and stretchy & grippy, but nothing that small. Help me out guys...what the heck am I missing?


    Home depot and the like cary lots of different poly tubing. Might also try a pet store for aquarium supplies. Thinner walled tube is the key, so it will stretch and form a better/tighter seal...but there is no back pressure on the hose so it does not really need a tight seal. If the bleeder is leaking thorugh the threads, open it less, or you can wrap the threads in teflon tape.

    Just remember, brake fluid is toxic and needs to be recycled (same place as you would recycle anti-freeze....as they are both glycol based).


    Worst case, you could use a spring type hose clamp if needed



    Lastly, IMO (and many years of running Hopes) I HIGHLY suggest making a slight change to the 'official' bleed precedure. Rather than opening the bleed nipple and then squeezing the lever, do the reverse....Squeeze the lever pretty hard, and then quickly in one motion, crack the bleeder. This provides MUCH higher fluid velocity and serves to flush micro-bubbles out of the system. Also, it can be fairly beneficial to physically jolt the parts of the system to further dislodge small adhered bubbles. I use a screwdriver handle to tap the calliper...then the hose working my way up to the lever. Then with the bleeder closed, pull the lever hard, and let it SNAP return. Do this a few times and I GUARANTEE you will get a bunch of small bubbles come to the surface of the lever reservior.
    Last edited by davep; 02-10-2010 at 06:45 PM.

  11. #11
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    AHA!! Aquarium tubing...brilliant. Thanks!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by davep

    Lastly, IMO (and many years of running Hopes) I HIGHLY suggest making a slight change to the 'official' bleed precedure. Rather than opening the bleed nipple and then squeezing the lever, do the reverse....Squeeze the lever pretty hard, and then quickly in one motion, crack the bleeder. This provides MUCH higher fluid velocity and serves to flush micro-bubbles out of the system. Also, it can be fairly beneficial to physically jolt the parts of the system to further dislodge small adhered bubbles. I use a screwdriver handle to tap the calliper...then the hose working my way up to the lever. Then with the bleeder closed, pull the lever hard, and let it SNAP return. Do this a few times and I GUARANTEE you will get a bunch of small bubbles come to the surface of the lever reservior.

    Quality. I tried this today and the quality of the bleed is slightly better. By slightly better I mean the lever is slightly firmer than after a normal bleed. I did have a few small bubbles come up in the reservoir when following the last step of the bleed. This must be it.
    "Three balls at once...who knew?" - Cotton McKnight

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by davep
    Lastly, IMO (and many years of running Hopes) I HIGHLY suggest making a slight change to the 'official' bleed precedure. Rather than opening the bleed nipple and then squeezing the lever, do the reverse....Squeeze the lever pretty hard, and then quickly in one motion, crack the bleeder. This provides MUCH higher fluid velocity and serves to flush micro-bubbles out of the system. Also, it can be fairly beneficial to physically jolt the parts of the system to further dislodge small adhered bubbles. I use a screwdriver handle to tap the calliper...then the hose working my way up to the lever. Then with the bleeder closed, pull the lever hard, and let it SNAP return. Do this a few times and I GUARANTEE you will get a bunch of small bubbles come to the surface of the lever reservior.
    Sweet.... good tips. Thanks guys. Love these brakes.

  14. #14
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    Lastly, IMO (and many years of running Hopes) I HIGHLY suggest making a slight change to the 'official' bleed precedure. Rather than opening the bleed nipple and then squeezing the lever, do the reverse....Squeeze the lever pretty hard, and then quickly in one motion, crack the bleeder. This provides MUCH higher fluid velocity and serves to flush micro-bubbles out of the system. Also, it can be fairly beneficial to physically jolt the parts of the system to further dislodge small adhered bubbles. I use a screwdriver handle to tap the calliper...then the hose working my way up to the lever. Then with the bleeder closed, pull the lever hard, and let it SNAP return. Do this a few times and I GUARANTEE you will get a bunch of small bubbles come to the surface of the lever reservior.
    Sounds advice, but it's important to add that you should either put something in between the pistons or check how far the pistons have moved after every pull of the lever. If the lever is pulled without the bleed nipple open, the pistons will start to extend; so if you don't keep a check on them there's a risk that one will pop out will you're bleeding. Also, if the pistons aren't pushed back flush with the caliper when the syystem is closed up again, it will be overfilled and unable to compensate for fluid expansion which may occur under repeated/prolonged braking.
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