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  1. #1
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    home made avid bleed kits

    hi all
    has anyone made an home made bleed kit for they avid? or is it possible to make one.
    thwang

  2. #2
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    probably not because you need the special bleed fittings that screw into the bleed ports on the lever and caliper, then you would need the hose clamps that screw into the syringes,

    IMO it will be easier to buy the kit,it may be expensive, but it is worth it
    i was in the same position awhile back, wondering weather it would be worth dropping $60 AUD on the bleed kit

    After numerous bleeds on both mine and my mates brakes, the kit has already paid for itself, and im really glad i bought it

  3. #3
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    Since it is dot fluid and you don't want to get it all over I would advise against botching together a kit. Those nice brass bits to interface to the system is where most of the cost of the kit is. The rest of it is pennies (or whatever your currency is ) Check ebay. There is a seller who was pretty regular about putting up the kit for around $25, that's where I got mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  4. #4
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    You bet I made my own kit. In fact for the $15 Canadian I bought in parts, I've cranked out 3 kits now. My friends are very happy.

    I replicated the brass fittings with some M5 hex head bolts, hardness grade of 8.8. They were soft enough for me to cut them to a reasonable length, drill a 1/16" pilot hole through them, expand the hole to 5/64" and make a shallow countersink in the head of 5/32". A short length of 5/32" brass tubing was soldered into the countersink.

    Some small rubber o-rings, 1/8" ID plastic tubing, 30ml syringes, and the fattest needles the medical supply store had were used to round out the kits. I didn't bother with trying to replicate the hose clamps. They really are not needed at all. Brake fluid has more than enough surface tension to not run all over the place.

    I've used them to bleed Elixir CRs and Juicy 3's. Using Avid's bleed instructions, they work great. I might be able to put up some pictures later if anyone wants to see them.

    Chris.

  5. #5
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    MacGyver would be proud to wield such a bleed kit. Kudos for getting in there and doing it. At $15 per kit it is worth the extra $10 to buy the prefab kit. But if you can crank out a few for that price and not spend much time, then it is indeed a good savings. I am sure pictures would be appreciated by all. Your description is pretty good, but you lost me at the brazing and needles. Picture is worth a thousand words
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    Since it is dot fluid and you don't want to get it all over I would advise against botching together a kit. Those nice brass bits to interface to the system is where most of the cost of the kit is. The rest of it is pennies (or whatever your currency is ) Check ebay. There is a seller who was pretty regular about putting up the kit for around $25, that's where I got mine.
    Yeah I got mine from ebay, probably same guy, for $22.
    The 2009 kit is around $50, the 2008 is cheaper, around $35.

  7. #7
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    That would be $15 for THREE kits, or $5 per kit. Medical supply is surpisingly cheap ($3.10 for two syringes and needles). Bolts and o-rings are 20 cents each (though my local Canadian Tire gave me the o-rings for free when I asked for some!). Brass tubing was a few dollars for 12 inches and plastic hose was already lying around here.

    Concerning the needles themselves, I just cut off the metal tips near flush with the plastic fitting on the syringe end. You can see the metal just poking out in the pics.

    Here they are (sorry if some find the pics too big, but the detail may help):





    Chris.

  8. #8
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    Chris, (chrissa)

    I commend you on making your own bleed kit. Job well done!

    I find it all too often where people will rather spend a little extra and buy something that they could easily make. Some may not consider it "easy" but this is only because they have become conditioned and no longer have the "i can make that" attitude. I'm like you where I'd rather make something I know I can easily make....regardless of its retail cost factor.

    Unfortunately, this doesn't always yield the best (better) solution or a cheaper one for that matter. As an example, my wheel truing stand I made actually ended up costing me as much or more than what I could have bought I also must admit it isn't as nice as a store bought unit....but that how it works sometimes

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaveOn
    Unfortunately, this doesn't always yield the best (better) solution or a cheaper one for that matter. As an example, my wheel truing stand I made actually ended up costing me as much or more than what I could have bought I also must admit it isn't as nice as a store bought unit....but that how it works sometimes
    Yep, I try to anticipate those times. Not owning a soldering iron or a brazing torch, this is one of those times

    Chrissa, thanks for posting those up. I think you can skip the needle step depending on where the syringes come from. Most that I have bought come with a plastic cap that can be drilled out and then the tubing installed over that.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  10. #10
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    I am all for building stuff yourself: I saved many thousands (nearly 1/2 the cost) by building my own house, and several hundred building my own bike light.

    Investing even an hour to save $5 or$10 on a $30 bleed kit seems silly, especially when you only need one kit to share among a circle of friends and could split the cost.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaveOn
    Unfortunately, this doesn't always yield the best (better) solution or a cheaper one for that matter. As an example, my wheel truing stand I made actually ended up costing me as much or more than what I could have bought I also must admit it isn't as nice as a store bought unit....but that how it works sometimes
    Hahaha, I know what you mean. There are a few projects around here that have gone way off the rails like that. My only hope is that I learned something in the process that I might be able to reuse again. Though in the case of a wheel truing stand, I did the opposite of you. I did buy Park's high end stand, but now I rarely pull it out. I once had to replace a rim on the rear wheel of a Honda CR125. I used a cheap dial indicator and magnetic base to measure and true the run out. Now all my wheels pretty much are left on the bikes and get trued using that indicator. It's way easier to true when you can actually quantify the run out. The $250 truing stand is gathering more and more dust, and my $30 dial indicator/stand is still running strong.

    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    I think you can skip the needle step depending on where the syringes come from. Most that I have bought come with a plastic cap that can be drilled out and then the tubing installed over that.
    Yeah, I think you're right. You can get what's called an irrigation syringe which has a long pointy tip on it. I've seen both examples where the tip is molded right into the syringe or an irrigation tip that fits into where the needle would normally go. Unfortunately, the medical supply store I went to had no separate tips and the largest one piece irrigation syringe they had was 15ml.

    Chris.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDM
    I saved many thousands (nearly 1/2 the cost) by building my own house
    Remodeling...okay...but I don't think my heart could take building an entire house (foundation & up).

    Quote Originally Posted by JDM
    Investing even an hour to save $5 or$10 on a $30 bleed kit seems silly, especially when you only need one kit to share among a circle of friends and could split the cost.
    I can't speak for Chris but for me it has nothing to do with money.

    • Spend 30 minutes at work making $30.
    • Asking your friends for $10 each for a retail bleed kit.
    • Spend 30 minutes making something for you and 2 other friends....priceless.


    BTW: The parts chrissa pointed out for $5/ea is actually more like $1 for me because I already have the syringes from an inkjet refill kit. I only need a bolt, o-ring and dot 5.1 at a local auto/cycle store.

    Quote Originally Posted by chrissa
    I used a cheap dial indicator and magnetic base to measure and true the run out.
    Thats how I now do it. I use a dial-indicator kit I had for setting up ring & pinions (rear ends). The magnetic base doesn't work on carbon so I use pivot clamps.

  13. #13
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    This morning I made my own avid type bleed screw. I wasn't in a hurry but it only took me 15 minutes and was < $1.

    [SIZE="2"](I think I'll need to trim some of threads down)[/SIZE]
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
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    My hat is off to the great self-made tools!! Great ideas indeed!! Very nice work, congratulations!!
    But not everyone has a metal lathe, gas soldering tools OR the abilities.
    I've made a few tools of my own but that "MacGyverism" isn't in all of us.
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRONMAN1518
    My hat is off to the great self-made tools!! Great ideas indeed!! Very nice work, congratulations!!
    But not everyone has a metal lathe, gas soldering tools OR the abilities.
    I've made a few tools of my own but that "MacGyverism" isn't in all of us.
    Hand drill and a cheap high watt pen style soldering iron.

    EDIT: though on one fitting I did try my plumber's torch and I wasn't really happy with the results. It was way too aggressive for such a small amount of metal. I also have a really nice high end Weller soldering station. I cranked that up to 850 degrees F and it made super short work of the joint.

    A tip for soldering: I drilled a hole in a 2x4 that was snug enough for the screw threads to slip into. It held the screw steady enough to easily apply the solder and iron, and the wood does a great job at insulating against losing any heat unlike a pair of pliers or a metal vice.

    The initial 1/16" pilot hole should really be drilled with a cobalt drill bit. Use lots of cutting oil. Spin the drill bit very slowly and go slow.
    Last edited by chrissa; 06-12-2009 at 09:53 AM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaveOn
    This morning I made my own avid type bleed screw. I wasn't in a hurry but it only took me 15 minutes and was < $1.
    RaveOn, that looks great!

  17. #17
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    Anyone try to use JB Weld instead of brazing/soldering?
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRONMAN1518
    Anyone try to use JB Weld instead of brazing/soldering?
    Should work okay as long as you really rough up the metals.

    I have used PC7 & PC11 in the past on many marine applications. The stuff will join just about anything and you can find it in a good hardware store. The stuff works awsome and is an ideal product for any do it yourself type. For this application, certainly better than JB Weld.

    http://www.pcepoxy.com/pastepoxies/pastepc7.asp

    Home depot sells it

    BTW: I brazed my fittings together...the tube and bolt was S/S.

  19. #19
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    The clamps are not necessary, but they do help quite a bit in degassing the fluid. This makes for a more thorough bleed.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    The clamps are not necessary, but they do help quite a bit in degassing the fluid. This makes for a more thorough bleed.
    Your finger over the end of the fitting makes for de-gassing the fluid pretty easy too.

  21. #21
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    Cool DIYs, however the "real" kits cost $25 canadian and I live in Whistler; I imagine most people would get them for less than that (includes DOT4 I believe, maybe 5.1, not like it matters).

  22. #22
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    bleed kit

    *****en kit !

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    The clamps are not necessary, but they do help quite a bit in degassing the fluid. This makes for a more thorough bleed.
    While I do agree that degassing the fluid is a good idea, the first step in the bleed process is to them introduce bubbles from the caliper into the syringe Also, there is a double up on degassing since you are pulling vacuum on the caliper as well. So the additional degassing really does little if anything.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  24. #24
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    cool write-up guys. I thought I'd add a bit to try and make it easier.

    M5 female threads play well with 10/32 male threads so If you can find a 10/32 male thread to bard end fitting at the local hardware/plumbing supply store you can skip the soldering/brasing step altogether.

    just an FYI. the hose clamps can be found at any medical supply house too if you really want them.
    Last edited by avbcon12; 10-18-2009 at 06:29 PM.

  25. #25
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    Those are some great tips! I may have to go look for some of those barb fittings. That also lets you skip the drilling step which is the biggest pain!

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