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  1. #1
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    Reputation: cnewsome69's Avatar
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    HELP!! Juicy 7 problem even after numerous bleeds

    I have a set of Juicy 7 carbons and the rear brake has started to give me trouble. During the past few rides the lever has started to get softer and softer eventually going all the way to the bar resulting in zero braking in the rear.

    I bled the brake (there was a lot of air in the line) and once again for a few rides it was fine but then repeated the pattern above resulting in zero braking once again.

    After removing the caliper from the frame and inspecting everything closely I could find no fluid leaking or anything else that would signal an obvious problem. I have no experience with disassembling calipers or replacing any internal parts on them but I am suspecting that something is wrong inside the caliper.... BTW--pads were replaced recently as well (have about 150 miles on them). It seems that air is making it's way into the system (caliper, hose, lever) somewhere along the line because after re-bleding the system each time I am removing lots of trapped air and then it seems fine but shortly thereafter goes right back to mush.....

    Any ideas of what to do next would be much appreciated. I was thinking about just taking the brake to the LBS and if there is an issue, maybe SRAM will warranty it as these are less than 2 yrs old with low miles on them.

    THANKS!!!
    '10 Santa Cruz BLTc
    2009 LOOK 585 Optimum

  2. #2
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    Yep, take it to a shop. You likely need a reseal, or at the least, new diaphragms for the levers. They tend not to last too long and weep, then leak.

  3. #3
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    You might be missing a step or not doing it right. I have bled a set a brakes over and over again and there was always air in it causing the same problems. I think a good bleed will fix this problem.
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  4. #4
    aka Willy Vanilly
    Reputation: will8250's Avatar
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    This may be obvious but could it be that the banjo bolt (I think that's the right name for it) is still a little loose? It's that hollow hex head bolt that the bleed screw threads into that allows you to adjust the angle of the hose coming off the caliper. I was tweaking the angle of the hose once and think that is where some air may have entered the system.
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  5. #5
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    I have checked the banjo bolt and its real tight. Regarding the other suggestion about missing something on the bleed process/not doing it right: I suppose that's a possibility but I have bled lots of Avid brakes before basically following this procedure and never had a problem (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mg6NbIjmOM).

    Which is why I am thinking there is something wrong internally (either lever or caliper).
    '10 Santa Cruz BLTc
    2009 LOOK 585 Optimum

  6. #6
    Praise Bob
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    You are not doing anything wrong

    If your brakes were originally firm and then developed air in the system then you are not doing anything wrong with the bleed. If air was in your system BEFORE you bled them then how does it follow the air was the result of a bad bleed job? I've noticed that everyone is so quick to blame the OP for a botched job or faulty brakepads. I dont care what kind of pads you have, they dont introduce air into your system.

    If you are continually getting air in your system then you have a failure at any number of areas. Typically it is the seal around the pistons in the caliper. The second is at the diaphragm in the reservoir and lastly at all the housing junctions. If air is getting in your system at a pretty rapid pace you should be able to detect fluid leaking at one of those areas. If this email confuses you, bring it to a shop.

  7. #7
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    Thanks Rex!!
    Your reply does not confuse me but only confirms what I was thinking. I will bring the brake into the LBS and see what they say....
    '10 Santa Cruz BLTc
    2009 LOOK 585 Optimum

  8. #8
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    THe banjo bolts on my brakes have o-rings. I over tightened them and cut one. this produced simular results to what you are seeing. I replaced the o-rings and didn't tighten the banjo as hard, re-bled, and they were find. I noticed this by a small leak under the banjo.

    I also thought I was doing a good job of bleeding. Turns out I wasn't. Plus the leak.
    Team MOJO Wheels.

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