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  1. #1
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    Hayes Mag lever pull problem

    My levers are working there way farther to the bars, like the calipers are not resetting for pad wear. I had recently bleed both brakes in the spring and the levers were firm and worked well. After a couple days at the local ski resort the levers are getting too close to the bars. Brakes still work fine but I have to pull the levers in too far.

    Any thoughts or ideas?
    I can fix it............... my dad has an awesome set of tools

  2. #2
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    The reach adjuster just probably needs to be dialed back out. It's the 2mm (2.5mm on older models) allen on the knuckle.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    The reach adjuster just probably needs to be dialed back out. It's the 2mm (2.5mm on older models) allen on the knuckle.
    I have ruled that out, I should have mentioned that. One did work it's way out a little, but that's not the problem.

    I should have mentioned that both front and rear are doing the same thing. Thanks
    I can fix it............... my dad has an awesome set of tools

  4. #4
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    Bleed problem

    If there was air in the caliper from the spring bleed it moved to the MC when you started riding recently and is giving you the closer to the bar feel.

    Many shops don't really understand bleeding. It's not about just pushing a bunch of fluid through to get bubbles out. They'll need to created a vacuum to suck the bubbles back back from the caliper into the squeeze bottle. Pushing fluid through rarely works.

    R

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbsince1981
    If there was air in the caliper from the spring bleed it moved to the MC when you started riding recently and is giving you the closer to the bar feel.

    Many shops don't really understand bleeding. It's not about just pushing a bunch of fluid through to get bubbles out. They'll need to created a vacuum to suck the bubbles back back from the caliper into the squeeze bottle. Pushing fluid through rarely works.

    R
    I pushed fluid from the caliper to the lever bleed hole. Should I have used a different method?

    Edit: I looked betwen the calipers/pads to see the size gap that was there. It is noticably more than what I am used to seeing. I did notice while riding that there was no intermitant disc rub that I usally got.

    So I removed the calipers from the frame/fork and carefully squezzed the levers to close the pad gap. I did end up closing the one too far and had to remove the pads and push the piston back.

    Now the levers feel like they used to. I even measured the lever tips before (70mm) and after I squeeze the levers (40mm firm) and they are pretty much even front to rear.

    What would cause these pistons not to be self adjusting like they should? Is it air?

    Thanks
    Last edited by spacoli; 06-18-2007 at 06:17 PM.
    I can fix it............... my dad has an awesome set of tools

  6. #6
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    Pad wear...

    If the pads are worn past half, then they're will be more lever travel before the pads hit the rotor.

    During use the pads make brake dust. The dust collects on the outer diameter of the pistons, during normal usage the dust works it's way past the square seals in the caliper. This dries out the seal to piston interface reducing the retraction. Lubricating this interface is key to optimal brake performance.

    The way you evened out the lever travel is correct, on the wheel with more lever travel remove the wheel, squeeze the lever one squeeze to the bars, reinstall the wheel and check the two levers for even travel. Repeat as required. If the squeeze was too much, remove the pads, use a 13mm box wrench to push the pistons back, replace the pads and the wheel and squeeze the levers to pump the pistons back out. Check the lever travel and adjust as necessary.

    R

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbsince1981
    If the pads are worn past half, then they're will be more lever travel before the pads hit the rotor.

    During use the pads make brake dust. The dust collects on the outer diameter of the pistons, during normal usage the dust works it's way past the square seals in the caliper. This dries out the seal to piston interface reducing the retraction. Lubricating this interface is key to optimal brake performance.



    R
    How and what do you use to lube the seal?

    I know this bike had set for a while before I had bought it off eBay, so that may be the problem. Thanks
    I can fix it............... my dad has an awesome set of tools

  8. #8
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    DOT fluid or silicone spray to lube the seal.

    When you push fresh fluid through, it carries the bubbles out with it. Use a syringe to do it. The squeeze bottle is a joke.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    DOT fluid or silicone spray to lube the seal.

    When you push fresh fluid through, it carries the bubbles out with it. Use a syringe to do it. The squeeze bottle is a joke.
    Thanks, I do use a syringe. I will lube the pistons up.
    I can fix it............... my dad has an awesome set of tools

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